Arts On Line Education Update May 30, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

 

In anticipation of the full Senate chamber vote at the end of June, the Senate Finance Committee released its final hearing schedule for the state’s FY 18-19 budget bill, HB49. The budget must be finalized by Friday, June 30.

 

  • Subcommittee reports: Tuesday, May 30 (2:30 p.m.)

 

  • Public Testimony:
    • Wednesday, May 31 (2:30 p.m.)
    • Thursday, June 1 (11:00 a.m.)
    • Tuesday, June 6 (11:00 a.m.)
    • Wednesday, June 7 (11:00 a.m.)

 

Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing. Oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education

On the subcommittee’s last day of testimony for HB49 David Meuse, representing Ohio Citizens for the Arts, was one of many interested parties who testified.  Meuse, the past chairman of the board for The Columbus Foundation and the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA,) discussed how arts funding generates economic benefits and how the arts strengthen education.  He shared that “We know this from a recent research study conducted by the Center for Regional Development at Bowling Green State University, which shows that the creative industries support nearly 231,000 jobs and contribute almost $32 billion to the state’s economy.”

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

The subcommittee heard testimony from nearly 60 different interested parties regarding HB49 over a two day period.  Among those testifying was a group of teachers voicing their support of language to eliminate the Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) program. The teachers said that while the program was well-meaning, it took too much time away from their students and required excessive paperwork and preparation.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Headed to the Governor for Signature

SB9: This legislation establishes a tax holiday for August 4 – 6.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio lawmakers approve 2017 August sales tax holiday

“Ohio consumers will again get a back-to-school sales tax break on clothing, school supplies and instructional materials in August.”

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB181:– Sponsor testimony from Reps. Ron Hood (R-Ashville) and Thomas E. Brinkman Jr. (R-Mt. Lookout).  This bill would eliminate Ohio learning standards and related tests as well as teacher and principal evaluations.

HB37: The committee accepted a substitute version.  The Legislative Services Commission (LSC) analysis can be viewed here.  This legislation would require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

HB170: Proponent testimony and a substitute bill was accepted. This bill calls for developing optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science. It also would address educator qualifications for computer science and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.  The LSC analysis on the change can be viewed here.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation

 

HB225: Education Plan (Gavarone, T.)
Regarding procedures for approval or disapproval of the state education plan for the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.
HB242: Retirement Benefits (Carfagna, R.)
Regarding School Employees Retirement System annual cost-of-living adjustments.
HB246: Classroom Facilities (Boccieri, J., Rezabek, J.)
To require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to provide funding to certain county boards of developmental disabilities to assist in the acquisition of classroom facilities.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Wednesday, May 31

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB203 Barnes, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Increase access to youth summer job opportunities

 

HB217 Brenner, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Prohibit college applications asking about disciplinary actions

 

1:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 4th Hearing, All Testimony

Address Computer Science Curriculum

 

HB176 Thompson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Address school assessments and curricula and teacher evaluations

 

HB200 Koehler, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB154 Smith/Manning, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid Program

 

HB220 Leland, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Regards use of funds by community and non-public schools

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 

ODE: Spread the word: Kids eat free this summer!

“Again this summer, the Summer Food Service Program is providing children with free, healthy meals, and we need your help spreading the word to families and students. It’s easy to participate and no sign up is required. Simply call (866) 3-HUNGRY, visit education.ohio.gov/KidsEat or download the free Ohio Department of Education mobile app for iPhone and Android and check back regularly to find meal times and locations.”

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio schools might regain paper option for standardized tests

“After one year of requiring students to take their state standardized tests on a computer, Ohio’s legislators could give the state’s schools the choice to go back to paper and pencil.  The version of the state budget that the House passed on May 2 says that schools may administer the tests on paper, online or by using a combination of the two. The budget still must go through the Senate and to Gov. John Kasich for approval by June 30.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: State auditor urges steep cuts in Delaware schools

“The state auditor has sent a troubling forecast to the Delaware school district, urging it to cut jobs and extracurricular programs and overhaul its health-care benefits.  And even after that, the district would face more than a $1 million deficit without new revenue.  The district could cut nearly $4.6 million from its $54 million budget, based on a performance audit released Thursday by Auditor Dave Yost.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Don’t penalize us for failing schools, charter overseers say, if management is good

“Failing grades at charter schools shouldn’t bring automatic penalties, Ohio’s charter oversight organizations say, so long as schools have good oversight otherwise.  Leaders of Ohio’s nationally-ridiculed charter school community continued a campaign to limit repercussions for the lagging academic performance of charters before a state Senate sub-committee last week.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: Budget cuts bleed schools

“Twenty years after the Ohio Supreme Court found that Ohio’s school funding was inadequate — violating the state constitutional mandate to provide a “thorough and efficient” education — lawmakers might make things even worse.  There is fear of the Senate chopping or even zeroing out an anticipated increase in the so-called “funding cap.” That’s an arbitrary limit the state sets on how much a district’s total state funding can grow, regardless of how many additional students it is serving.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: Open the shades on charter spending

“No function of state government is more important than its constitutional obligation to “secure a thorough and efficient system of common schools throughout the state.” Education is the bedrock of democracy. That is why the Ohio Constitution, since 1851, has obligated the state to provide an education to each of its citizens.  How thoroughly and how efficiently the state fulfills this mandate should concern every Ohioan, every year, every generation.”

 

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

President Trump released his full budget last week for FY2018.  While the final version will likely look much different once it makes its way through Congress, Trump’s proposal calls for an increase in spending for school choice and school vouchers with a reduction in funds for special education grants and teacher development.  Overall, the budget outlines a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education.

 

Time Magazine: Donald Trump’s 2018 Budget Slashes Education Department Funding by 13.5%

“Education advocates say President Donald Trump’s budget contradicts his campaign pledge to make college more affordable with its proposed elimination of subsidized student loans and cuts in other programs that help students pay tuition.  The 2018 budget, unveiled Tuesday, slashes funding for the Education Department by 13.5 percent.”

 

Washington Post: DeVos Promises ‘the Most Ambitious Expansion of Education Choice in Our Nation’s History’ – But Offers No Details

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos promised Monday evening that President Trump would propose “the most ambitious expansion of education choice in our nation’s history,” but she offered no details about the administration’s plans.  Speaking in Indianapolis before a friendly audience of school voucher proponents, she instead laid out a moral case to dramatically transform American education — and improve young people’s prospects — by expanding school choice.”

 

CNN: Trump’s budget by the numbers: What gets cut and why

“President Donald Trump’s team released its first full budget proposal on Tuesday, and while lawmakers are likely to dismiss most of it — as they traditionally do with most White House wish lists — the document provides fresh insight into the administration’s priorities.  While the overall proposed spending is about on par with last year, at $4.1 trillion for 2018, the budget is notable for the knife it takes to domestic programs focused on science and research, the arts and, most notably, social welfare programs.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: New Trump budget zeroes out Great Lakes Restoration: See what it means for Ohio

“From eliminating the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to cutting food stamps, the budget proposal that President Donald Trump unveiled on Tuesday contains something to upset nearly everyone.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

 

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Arts On Line Education Update May 22, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

 

Passed by the Senate

SB8 passed the Senate unanimously last week.  This bill requires the School Facilities Commission to create a program to assist districts in purchasing technology, including improvements in security measures. The day before, the Senate Education committee adopted a substitute bill for SB8 to ensure joint vocational school districts would have access to assistance in purchasing technology, as well expand the scope of the program to allow a broader range of school projects to be considered.

 

Passed by the House

The House passed HB124 by a vote of 89-2.  The legislation provides a fix for the Delaware Area Career Center levy that was placed on the ballot in only one of the counties in which the district has territory.  The joint vocational school district may now submit the question of a tax levy renewal to voters in the other counties who did not have an opportunity to vote on the levy in November of 2015.

 

House Government & Accountability Oversight Committee

The committee heard proponent testimony on HB87 which calls for funds from community schools to be returned to the state as a result of an audit finding against the community school.  Mark H. Curtis, president of the Twinsburg City Schools Board of Education testified that “Our district only receives $1,280.95 in foundation funding per student. However, approximately $6,583.97 is deducted for each student attending a charter school. This disparity places our district in a position of having to raise additional tax dollars to make up for those lost to charter schools.”

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB170 – Proponent testimony on HB170. This bill calls for developing optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science. It also would address educator qualifications for computer science and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.

 

HB176 – Sponsor testimony from Rep. Andy Thompson (R-Marietta).  This legislation would make changes to school assessments and curricula as well as teacher evaluations.

 

HB200 – Sponsor testimony from Rep. J. Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield). This legislation is identical to SB85, and eliminates the EdChoice Scholarship Program and the Cleveland Scholarship Program to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

House State and Local Government Committee

HB134 – Passed out of committee.   The bill was amended to narrow the focus to only Medina County and allows the school district to spend county improvement board grant funds on permanent improvements outside of the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

 

 

Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee

The committee heard sponsor testimony on SB3 from Sen. Bill Beagle.   The legislation would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system, programs that may be offered by primary and secondary schools, certificates of qualification for employment, and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week.

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

The subcommittee continued to hear testimony from concerned districts and on the potential negative impact the state’s budget bill, HB49, may have on their schools.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation:

HB233 FIREARMS (Rep. Becker) To enact the “Decriminalization Effort For Ending Notorious Deaths (DEFEND)” to provide an opportunity for a concealed handgun licensee or qualified military member to avoid guilt for carrying a concealed handgun into a prohibited place if the person leaves upon request, and to penalize as disorderly conduct failing to leave upon request or returning with a firearm. 

  • Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio bill would decriminalize carrying concealed handguns in schools, other gun-free zones “Concealed handgun permit holders caught carrying on school grounds and other gun-free sites would no longer be subject to prison time under a bill introduced in the Ohio House.  Rep. John Becker, a Clermont County Republican, sponsored a bill decriminalizing the violation. Under House Bill 233, a concealed handgun license holder, with a concealed firearm, discovered in a gun-free zone must leave upon request.”

 

HB217 COLLEGE APPLICATIONS-DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS (Rep. Andrew Brenner) To prohibit institutions of higher education from requiring students to disclose disciplinary actions on their applications for admission

 

HB220 NONPUBLIC SCHOOL FUNDS (Rep. David Leland) With regard to the use of funds by community schools and nonpublic schools

 

HB224 RE-SERVING SCHOOL LUNCH ITEMS (Rep. Catherine Ingram) To permit districts and schools to re-serve time- and temperature-controlled food items to students if items are unused and returned unopened, undamaged, and in the original packaging

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, May 23

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB37 Arndt, Improve school safety and technology infrastructure

2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, Address academic content standards and assessments

1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

 

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, Address computer science curriculum

3rd Hearing, All Testimony

 

Wednesday, May 24

2:30 p.m. (or after session), North Hearing Room

Finance -Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, Chair: Hite

HB49 Smith, R., Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

8th Hearing, All Testimony

 

Thursday, May 25

10:00 a.m., North Hearing Room

Finance -Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, Chair: Hite

HB49 Smith, R., Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

9th Hearing, All Testimony

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 

ODE: Seeking districts to participate in truancy pilot program

“As part of House Bill 410, the Ohio Family and Children First Cabinet Council is seeking districts who are interested in taking part in a pilot program addressing truancy. Each school district will develop a multidisciplinary truancy team for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 school years that addresses attendance barriers for each child referred to the team.”

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: The Daily Briefing: Senate looking beyond $800 million budget hole

“Senate President Larry Obhof said his chamber has the $800 million hole in mind as it crafts the new two-year budget, but members are anticipating that figure could go higher when new, official tax revenue estimates come in June.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Akron to create arts-focused high school programs with KSU

“Kent State University and the Akron Public Schools will create a College and Career Academy in the district’s 10 high schools that focuses on fashion, arts, architecture and design.  The partnership was announced Tuesday at a ceremony naming the district as a Ford Next Generation Learning community.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Nonprofit exposes middle-schoolers to music making process

“No sooner had Columbus-area musician Nick D’Andrea asked five middle-schoolers to jot down better descriptions and metaphors for feeling hurt than Saba Bekuretsion and Hannah Moody penned these lyrics.  The words were exactly what D’Andrea was looking for from the students at Berwick Alternative K-8 School in Columbus City Schools.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Chronic absenteeism a growing concern in Ohio schools

“If your child misses school for a doctor’s appointment, it’s no big deal, right?  Miss another when family visits from out of town? It happens.  Just have a crazy morning and miss the bus? No big deal. She’ll make it tomorrow.  But it all adds up more than parents realize.”

 

Youngstown Vindicator: ODOT plow gets eye-popping paint, thanks to students

“When Mahoning County drivers are battling snowstorms next winter, the plow on one particular Ohio Department of Transportation truck may pop out at them.  A group of Canfield art students spent the last two weeks decorating a plow with a painting inspired by renowned pop artist Roy Lichtenstein.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos Announces All Spring State ESSA Plan Submissions Complete, Ready for Peer Review

“Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced that all state plans submitted for the spring deadline by 16 states and the District of Columbia under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) were found to be complete and ready for peer review.”

 

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

 

OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017

The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO: The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

 

 

Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education – November 7

Save the date November 7 for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education’s Professional Development Day.  More details will be released in a couple months, for additional information please email info@cincyartsalliance.org.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update May 15, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

Arts On Line Research Consultant, Joan Platz, has written a thorough summary of HB49 as passed by the House of Representatives May 2, 2017.  This analysis covers the bill in its entirety and shows how education and the arts fit into the picture.  The summary can be reviewed here.

 

With the budget bill now in the hands of the Senate, the Higher Education Subcommittee heard testimony from several agencies on the impact of the proposed funding levels.  Ohio Arts Council (OAC) Executive Director Donna Collins was one of many testifying on behalf of their organization last week.  Ms. Collins stressed the success OAC has had with their educational art programs as well as with administering grants to various organizations throughout the state.  With only 16 on staff, the OAC costs the state a modest amount which as Ms. Collins reported “totals less than 0.04% of the state’s total GRF appropriations, but produces a big return on investment.”  She continued to say, “In the last grant cycle, every OAC dollar was matched with local and private funds at a tremendous ratio of 56:1.”

 

The Senate Finance Committee on Primary and Secondary Education heard from concerned school districts that felt more change was needed to the school funding formula, particularly districts losing Tangible Personal Property tax dollars.  Although the House softened the blow with their final version of HB49, districts who rely heavily on property taxes say they will never be able to make up that loss of funds when the TPP is finally phased out.  Members of the Coalition for Fiscal Fairness for Ohio presented a plan that would help districts in this situation by ensuring they receive the same funding as in Fiscal Year 2015.

 

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

May 8 & 9

 

ESSA STATUS UPDATE

During last week’s State Board meeting, the Board’s standing committees each reviewed their assigned portion of Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan.  The committees will review the remainder of ESSA plan at the June meeting with the intent of the full Board approving the plan at the July meeting.  The plan would then be sent to Governor Kasich by August 18 to give him a full 30 days of review before the final Ohio ESSA plan would be officially submitted by the September 18 deadline.

 

The State Board Committees have been assigned the following sections for their review:

 

Accountability & Continuous Improvement Committee

May Meeting: 21st Century (section G) & Homeless Children (I)

June Meeting: Accountability/Improvement (A4) & Appendix A

 

Achievement & Graduation Requirements Committee

May Meeting: School Conditions (A6) / School Transitions (A7) / English Language Learners (E)

June Meeting: Eighth Grade Math Exception (A2) / Native Language Assessments (A3) / Rural and Low Income Schools (H)

 

Educators & Student Options Committee

May Meeting: Access to Educators (A5)

June Meeting: Effective Instruction (D)

 

Executive Committee

May Meeting: Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk (C)

June Meeting: Migratory Children (B) / Student Support/Enrichment Grants (F)

 

MODEL TRUANCY POLICY

The Board’s Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee voted to adopt a model policy on student truancy and absenteeism as required by House Bill 410.  HB410 was passed in December 2016 to encourage and support a preventative approach to excessive absences and truancy.  The model policy, as well as the release form to allow school officials to access data protected under the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), are set to be voted on by the entire Board during the June meeting.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

 

Newly Introduced Legislation:

HB203 SUMMER JOBS (Barnes, J.)

To require the Director of Development Services to establish a youth summer jobs pledging initiative to increase access to summer employment opportunities for high school and college youth.

 

HB200 SCHOOL CHOICE (Koehler, K.)

To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

Proponent testimony was given on HB47, the bill to ensure students serving in uniformed services are able to participate in extracurricular school activities.  The committee also heard HB170 sponsor testimony from Reps. Rick Carfagna (R-Genoa Township) and Mike Duffey (R-Worthington) as well as proponent testimony.  This bill addresses academic content standards and curriculum requirements for computer science as well as revises educator qualifications for computer science.

 

House State and Local Government Committee

The committee heard testimony on HB134, the bill to allow a school district to use community improvements board grants for permanent improvements outside the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

 

OHIO STATEHOUSE

Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC)

JEOC Executive Director, Lauren Monowar-Jones, presented the JEOC research agenda to the committee on Thursday, May 11.  One area of the research is commercially used assessments administered in Ohio schools.  Monowar-Jones hopes to determine which assessments each school district is using, the duration of the testing and if it is more than the law requires, as well as the sense of usage for the assessment.  The JEOC also plans to study the access students have to career technical education.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, May 16

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development, Chair: Duffey

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Revise workforce development laws

 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness  Chair: Brenner  

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Address computer science curriculum

 

HB200 Koehler, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB176 Thompson, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Address school assessments and curricula and teacher evaluations

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

 

StateImpact Ohio: Charter School Loophole Will Be Fixed in State Senate

“Dayton area Republican State Senator Peggy Lehner, says she’s ready to fix a provision allowing a failing school to continue operating by changing sponsors, who wouldn’t be punished for the schools performance. Because the state’s Legislative Services Committee drafted the amendment, the problem is fixable, Lehner says.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Supreme Court rules search that found bullets was constitutional

“The search of a high school student’s backpack that authorities say led to the discovery of bullets and later a gun was constitutional, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled Thursday.  At issue before the high court was whether the search of the backpack following an initial search violated the student’s privacy rights, which are generally weaker inside school walls.”


Columbus Dispatch: Officer rules ECOT owes $60 million

“A state hearing officer ruled against ECOT on Wednesday, determining the online school owes $60 million for enrollment that cannot be justified.  The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow could not justify most of its enrollment, and thus was overpaid by $64 million last school year, hearing officer Lawrence Pratt wrote in his recommendation, which now goes to the state Board of Education. He said the board should collect $60 million of that overpayment or deduct it from the school’s future payments.”

 

Akron Beacon Journal: Proposals would ban schools from challenging property taxes or make them pay opponent’s attorneys when they lose

“School districts and businesses are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on lawyers to fight over property taxes.  Schools want to collect more, and businesses try to pay less.  It’s a quiet and expensive game of cat-and-mouse that plays out each year in Columbus or county offices where property values are adjusted, challenged and readjusted. Each tweak impacts tax bills.”

 

TWC News: In Focus: Preparing Students for the Future

“State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria discusses the new graduation requirements and the different paths.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: School leads effort to develop non-grade high school transcript

“More than 100 independent schools, including Hawken and Laurel, have collaborated to invent a high school transcript that shows accomplishments instead of grades.”

 

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

 

OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017

The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO: The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

 

Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education

Save the date November 7 for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education’s Professional Development Day.  More details will be released in a couple months, for additional information please email info@cincyartsalliance.org.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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Arts On Line Education Update May 8, 2017

Happy National PTA Teacher Appreciation Week Ohio teachers!

 

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB 49)

The state’s budget bill, Sub.HB49, is now in the hands of the Ohio Senate.  The House passed on May 2 the FY18-19 budget, which includes $63.7 billion for the General Revenue Fund, and modifies significantly the original executive budget proposed by Governor Kasich.   Although K-12 saw an increase in funding for each year as well as a per pupil rate increase of $20, the increase did not grow with the rate of inflation and still leaves some concerned.

The Senate Finance Primary & Secondary Education Subcommittee delved into the school funding formula on May 4 with testimony from three school administrator groups.   The Ohio Association of School Business Officials, Ohio School Boards Association and Buckeye Association of School Administrators testified together on the issues they still see with the current funding formula. Howard Fleeter, economist and consultant for the Ohio Education Policy Institute, discussed the history of funding formulas as well as suggested adjustments the Senate could make. The state operating budget (HB49) must be signed into law by July 1, 2017.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: $63.7 billion state budget bill clears Ohio House

“The Ohio House on Tuesday passed a $63.7 billion, two-year state budget with additional money to fight Ohio’s opioid crisis.  The bill passed 58-37, mostly along party lines, and now heads to the Senate, which will make its own revisions over the coming weeks. Both chambers must agree to a bill before the new fiscal year begins July 1.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio House passes massive budget plan: Ohio Politics Roundup 

Toledo Blade: Ohio House OKs 2-year budget with few tax cuts

“For the first time since Gov. John Kasich took office, the Ohio House of Representatives on Tuesday approved a proposed two-year state budget that provides for no broad tax cuts.  State tax collections have trailed expectations for a year and the spending plan that now crosses the Capitol Rotunda to the Senate falls short of the deal Mr. Kasich reached with Republican Party leaders in recent weeks to cut $800 million from his original proposal.”

Columbus Dispatch: Funding cap hits central OH hard, costs $890 million statewide

“When the House rolled out its state budget changes last week, it included a $20 per pupil increase for charter schools and $6 more for private schools, compared to Gov. John Kasich’s initial plan.  But for Olentangy Schools, which is adding students faster than any district in the state, the House changes meant only $5.50 more per pupil by 2019.”

Dayton Daily News: Ohio House OKs $133B state budget, guts Kasich’s tax reform plans

“The Ohio House voted 58-37 Tuesday in favor of a 4,500-page state budget bill that jettisons Gov. John Kasich’s tax reform plans and carves out $170 million in additional money to fight the opiate addiction crisis gripping Ohio.”

Columbus Dispatch: Lawmaker says mystery charter school amendment appeared without warning

“A mystery amendment tucked into the House-passed state budget would let some online charter schools avoid having their poor academic scores drive down a sponsor’s performance rating.  But even the representative who sponsored the amendment says he doesn’t know how or why controversial language was added to the proposal — one that appeared to be trying to benefit Ohio e-schools, including, potentially, ECOT. ”

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

 

Bill Approved by the Ohio House

HB80 (LaTourette, K. Smith) School Food-Summer Intervention:  Requires school districts to allow approved summer food service program sponsors to use school facilities to provide food service for summer intervention services under certain conditions.  The bill has now been assigned to the Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee.

Bills Approved by the Ohio Senate

SB3 (Beagle, Balderson) Workforce Development:  Revises the laws governing the state’s workforce development system, programs that may be offered by primary and secondary schools, certificates of qualification for employment, and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, and designates the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week.

SB9 (Bacon) August Tax Holiday:  Provides for a three-day sales tax “holiday” in August 2017 during which sales of clothing and school supplies are exempt from sales and use taxes.  The bill has been approved by the Ohio Senate, and has been reported out of the House Ways & Means Committee.

SB10 (LaRose) Primary Election Requirements:  Expands the circumstances under which a board of elections or the secretary of state is not required to hold a primary election.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, May 8

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, May 9

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

4:00 p.m., Room 121

House Education and Career Readiness (Chair: Brenner)

HB154 Smith, R./Manning, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid Program

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 1st Hearing, Sponsor/Proponent Testimony

Address Computer Science Curriculum

HB47 Boccieri, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Enact Students to Soldiers Support Act

Wednesday, May 10

2:30 p.m. Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance – Primary and Secondary Ed. Sub., (Chair: Hite)

HB49 Smith, 2nd Hearing – Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

 

Columbus Dispatch: Roundup of local school issues

Check out the results of school levies from around the state.

Akron Beacon Journal: Ohio House plan gives charter school sponsors rated ‘effective’ today a perpetual pass on new and failing e-schools

“Amendments in the state budget bill would prevent the Ohio Department of Education from forcing academically failing charter schools to close — particularly online schools that have some of worst test scores in the nation and the most influential donors and lobbyists in Ohio. The House passed the $63.7 billion budget bill on Tuesday. It is now being considered by the Senate.” 

Columbus Dispatch: More than 1,000 rally at Statehouse for school choice

“More than 1,000 students, teachers and school officials rallied outside the Statehouse today to thank lawmakers for helping parents have a choice about where their children attend school.  There was much to celebrate. Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled General Assembly is preparing to pass new state budget that increases per-pupil funding for charter schools and private schools. In addition, lawmakers are considering a bill to expand statewide a program offering tax-funded vouchers for private school tuition.”

Charter Schools Focus of Kucinich’s Meetings

Former U.S. House Representative, Ohio State Senator, and Cleveland mayor, Dennis Kucinich, gave speeches last week in Parma, Elyria, Centerville, and Columbus, outlining his concerns about Ohio’s charter schools and privatization of public institutions in general.

At a press conference held on April 24, 2017 at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Mr. Kucinich said that state policies drain billions of dollars from public schools and transfer tax dollars to privately operated schools charter schools with “…little transparency, accountability, or government oversight.”

The former mayor cited his experience protecting Cleveland’s municipal electric plant from privatization efforts back in 1977 as why he is so concerned about the impact of charter schools on Ohio’s public education system.

He urged Ohioans to demand that public education receive adequate funding and that state and local resources be used to “rebuild education in the public interest.”

While answering questions from the audience, Mr. Kucinich said that he is consulting with a team of attorneys to explore taking legal action against charter schools, and will publish in January 2018 a report about charter schools and school privatization efforts in Ohio.

Dennis Kucinich brings his attack on charter schools to Parma, Elyria,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, April 26, 2017.

Real Choice Ohio to Meet

The first annual conference of Real Choice Ohio (RCO) is scheduled for May 12, 2017 from 9:00 – 3:00 p.m. at the Ohio School Board Association, 8050 N. High Street, Columbus, OH 43235.

Real Choice Ohio includes superintendents, school district leaders, and public school advocates, who are joining together to promote successful marketing practices to recruit and retain students to public schools.

To register for the meeting contact realchoiceohio1@gmail.com.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Social and emotional learning is focus of national commission visiting Cleveland schools

“A committee of high level educators and state officials studying “social and emotional learning” in schools nationwide are visiting the Cleveland school district this week to gather information and spark public discussion of the topic.  The visit will include two panels open to the public Tuesday morning at the Cleveland Public Library to highlight the importance of helping students with resolving conflicts, managing their emotions and seeing issues through the eyes of others.”


Columbus Business First: Here are the Central Ohio schools that spend the most (and least) on their students

“The public school district in Central Ohio that spends the most on its students is one of the smaller ones in the region – and consistently is an all-star academic performer.  The $15,818 it spends per student is 77.1 percent above the state-level expenditure average of $8,931.  We’ve ranked 30 local districts based on how much they spend per student, using data from the Ohio Department of Education.”

Associated Press: Ohio wants 4,700 educators back in fingerprint-check system

“About 4,700 Ohio-licensed educators are missing from Ohio’s fingerprint-tracking system that helps notify their employers about any new criminal charges against them, so they’re being asked to voluntarily be fingerprinted again and get background checks while officials seek to fix a loophole that led to the problem.  At least 1,200 of those educators currently work in Ohio public schools, according to the state Department of Education.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Last week’s federal spending bill maintained funding for three cultural agencies set to be eliminated by President Trump’s FY18 budget.  Not only did the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting endowments continue with funding, they received a slight increase as well.  The continuing resolution was passed in an effort to fund the federal government through September 2017.  Negotiations continue on the eleven appropriations measures for fiscal year 2018, which begins October 1, 2017.

Washington Post: Federal budget deal would spare arts agencies

“The new federal spending bill would spare — and even slightly increase — funding for three arts-related agencies that President Donald Trump has proposed eliminating: the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities.”

LA Times: Spending bill includes $2 million increase for NEA after Trump proposed eliminating funds

“Congressional leaders rejected the Trump administration’s proposal to eliminate money for federal arts programs, providing a small increase as part of a bipartisan spending deal.  The spending bill that Congress is expected to vote on this week includes $150 million for the National Endowment for the Arts and an identical sum for the Humanities endowment. In both cases, that’s a $2-million increase over last fiscal year.”

 

Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools

Several national education and civil rights organizations have formed the Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools (AROS) to oppose the Trump administration’s education and social policies, including the wall along the Mexican border, immigration policies, and using tax funds to pay for vouchers and charter schools.

AROS joined May Day Marches in several cities on May 1, 2017, including in Chicago, where the Chicago Teachers Union marched to defend public schools, civil rights, and saving communities.

AROS is a coalition of 10 national organizations of teachers, parents, and students, including the Alliance for Educational Justice, the American Federation of Teachers, the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, the Center for Popular Democracy, the National Education Association, the Schott Foundation for Public Education, and more.

AROS supports the following platform:

  • Fix school funding formulas to ensure equity and make investments to make schools and communities strong.
  • Invest in qualified teachers, relevant curriculum, and 10,000 sustainable community schools to provide social and health care services.
  • Support a free public education system rather than charter schools.
  • Embrace and invest in positive discipline practices and restorative justice as critical components for building a culture of mutual respect and commitment to educate young people.
  • End high stakes testing to rank and punish students, teachers, and schools, and make time for teaching and learning.
  • Include parents, communities, and educators in the decision-making process.

See www.reclaimourschools.org

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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Arts On Line Education Update May 1, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

The House Finance Committee accepted a substitute version of HB49 late last week, considerably altering Governor Kasich’s original executive budget.  The committee is scheduled to meet this week and will consider an omnibus amendment and report the bill out of committee. The substitute bill will then be sent to the full House for a vote, and if approved, moved on to the Senate.  The state operating budget (HB49) must be signed into law by July 1, 2017.

Visit OAAE’s website for a full review of changes pertaining to arts education in Substitute HB49.

News Clips on the State Budget:

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio House makes 325 changes to Kasich’s budget bill: See what’s in and out

“Boozy ice cream, drug prevention taught in driver’s ed and a new mileage reimbursement for state lawmakers were among the additions made Tuesday to Ohio’s next two-year operating budget.”

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio House plan funnels more cash to schools

“In addition to more money to battle the drug epidemic and fund schools, Ohio House Republicans are proposing hundreds of amendments to the budget proposed by Gov. John Kasich, including ones that would expand racino gambling, lower property-tax bills for farmers and soften charter-sponsor evaluations.  As is traditional, the two-year state budget bill also is crammed full of various law changes designed to fix problems, reward friends and alter spending.”

 

Marion Star: Ohio teachers won’t have to job shadow at businesses

“Ohio teachers won’t face a requirement to job shadow with businesses in order to renew their teacher’s licenses.  Ohio House Republicans on Tuesday axed Gov. John Kasich’s proposal to require the “externships” – essentially, a high-level job shadow – as part of the state’s two-year spending plan. With opposition to the idea strong among both parties in the Legislature, the proposal almost certainly will not reappear.”

 

Cincinnati Enquirer: See if your school would lose money under GOP plan

“Nearly half of all Ohio schools still would lose money next year under a plan proposed Tuesday by House Republicans, who decided to sign onto Gov. John Kasich’s plan to send less money to schools with shrinking populations.  House Republicans tweaked Kasich’s plan so that fewer schools would see declines in money from the state. Nevertheless, their decision to cut state money to some Ohio schools is remarkable, given their reluctance in recent years to send less money to any district. But with a slow-growing economy, state income tax revenue is tight, so lawmakers had less to spend.”

 

 

OHIO STATEHOUSE

Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Peggy Lehner, heard testimony on two education-related bills on Tuesday, April 25.

SB34 (Manning, G.): Requires the school year for public and charter schools to start after Labor Day

Proponents for SB34 included several tourism-driven businesses.  The common theme of their testimony was that a delay in starting school is beneficial to Ohio’s economy.   Lee Alexakos, vice president of community relations for Cedar Fair, also indicated that there are benefits to students as well.  “This legislation would allow for more real life work experience to better prepare our Ohio workforce. Studies show that students who work during high school summer months later in life have higher hourly wages, better annually earnings, and are more consistently employed,” she said.

SB85 (Huffman, M.): Creates one income-based voucher program

Testimony of proponents continued with Chad Aldis, Vice President for Ohio Policy and Advocacy at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.  Mr. Aldis feels that SB85 would make a number of changes that should significantly improve Ohio’s private school choice efforts.  “ If this legislation were to be adopted, Ohio would have simpler, easier to use system, serving students most in need, and funded in a more straightforward manner that would minimize its impact on communities around the state,” he said.  However his testimony, along with the others, was met with skepticism from members of the committee, including Lehner.  The Chair raised concerns on the funding source for the bill as well as if it could be implemented fairly to all students.

NEWLY INTRODUCED LEGISLATION

SB133: STUDENT BEHAVIOR (LaRose, F.)

Summary: To require the Education Management Information System to include information regarding persons at whom a student’s violent behavior that resulted in discipline was directed and to require the Department of Education to submit a one-time report to the General Assembly regarding that information.

SB140: WORKFORCE PROGRAMS (Schiavoni, J.)

Summary: To create the Public-Private Partnership Grant Program for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 to develop, enhance, and promote educational programs to address regional workforce needs; to create the Sector Partnership Grant Program for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 to identify and provide grants to industry partnerships; to support programs that improve access to workforce training opportunities for students; to support economic development and revitalization programs; and to make an appropriation.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, May 2

4:30 p.m., Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Committee (Chr. Brenner, A.)

HB47: EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES (Boccieri, J.)

Summary: To enact the “Students to Soldiers Support Act (S3A)” regarding the participation of students who are serving in the uniformed services in extracurricular activities at public and nonpublic schools and public and private colleges.

–2nd Hearing-Sponsor

HB154: COMMERCIAL DRIVER STUDENTS (Smith, R., Manning, N.)

Summary: To establish the Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid program and to make an appropriation.

–1st Hearing-Sponsor

HB170: COMPUTER SCIENCE (Carfagna, R., Duffey, M.)

Summary: With regard to academic content standards and curriculum requirements for computer science

–1st Hearing-Sponsor & proponent (Pending referral)

 

Wednesday, May 3

11:00 a.m. Room 115

House Higher Education & Workforce Development (Chr. Duffey, M)

HB58: CURSIVE HANDWRITING (Brenner, A., Slaby, M.)

Summary: To require instruction in cursive handwriting

–3rd Hearing-All testimony

HB66: TENURED FACULTY (Young, R.)

Summary: To require permanently tenured state university or college faculty members to teach at least three credit hours of undergraduate courses per semester

–First Hearing-Sponsor-Possible substitute

HB110: APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS (Hagan, C., Dean, B.)

Summary: To create a subprogram of the College Credit Plus Program that permits students to participate in certified apprenticeship programs.

–Ist Hearing-Sponsor

Thursday, May 4

10:00 a.m., Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance: Primary & Secondary Education Sub. (Chr. Hite, C.,)

Budget: Invited budget testimony from Legislative Service Commission, Buckeye Association of School Administrators, Ohio Association of School Business Officials and Ohio School Boards Association

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO


Cleveland Plain Dealer: No high school graduation fix comes from Ohio House

“Any fixes to the state’s high school graduation requirements probably won’t come out of the Ohio House, after none made it into in the mass of changes to the state’s budget bill today.  A special panel and the state school board had called on the legislature earlier this month to create new ways for the class of 2018, this year’s high school juniors, to graduate that do not rely on scores on state tests.”

Dayton Daily News: Ohio launches ‘Purple Star’ to recognize military-friendly schools

“The state has launched a Purple Star Award to recognize military-friendly schools in Ohio, school and military leaders say.  In an announcement Tuesday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, officials pointed to the challenges children in military families face as many transfer to multiple schools during a parent’s career in uniform and deal with fitting in to a new culture or a parent deployed to a war zone.  “I think what we’re seeing is that military students have specific needs, different needs than other students,” said Paolo DeMaria, state superintendent of public instruction.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: ECOT case stalls recovery of millions paid to other online schools

“Ohio’s attempts to recover about $20 million in state tax funding from eight online charter schools has stalled for more than six months while a much larger battle over more than $60 million from e-school giant ECOT lingers in appeals court.  The year-long fight between the Ohio Department of Education and ECOT, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, has also delayed the state legislature from sorting out how to avoid e-school funding controversies in the future.”

Associated Press: Ohio auditor begins 1st school district efficiency review

“Ohio Auditor Dave Yost says his office is conducting its first review of a school district’s potential to save money by sharing services.  The Republican auditor said recently that Bellaire Local School District in Belmont County will kick off a series of voluntary shared services feasibility studies around the state.

The reviews were made available under government efficiency bill passed last year. The legislation also set up a grant fund to cover the costs of the audits.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

On April 26 President Trump issued an Executive Order for an evaluation of all federal education statutes to ensure the government is not interfering in with states’ and local districts’ control of education.

Presidential Executive Order on Enforcing Statutory Prohibitions on Federal Control of Education  

New York Times: Trump Orders Review of Education Policies to Strengthen Local Control

“President Trump issued a sweeping review of federal education policies on an executive order to pinpoint areas where the government may be overstepping in shaping operations of local school systems.”

Associated Press: Trump Order Seeks to Limit Federal Role in K-12 Education

“Trump is giving Education Secretary Betsy DeVos just short of a year – 300 days – to identify areas where Washington has overstepped its legal authority in education, and modify and repeal regulations and guidance from her department, if necessary. A report will be returned to the White House and eventually made public, officials said.”

Other national news:

Huffington Post: U.S. Students Are Struggling In The Arts. Donald Trump’s Budget Would Make The Problem Worse.

“American teenagers are not excelling in the arts, and President Donald Trump’s proposed budget cuts will likely make matters worse, experts say.  The most recent results of a wide-ranging national educational assessment known as the Nation’s Report Card left significant room for improvement in the visual arts and music, the National Center for Education Statistics reported Tuesday.  Students scored an average 147 in music and 149 in visual arts on a scale of 300, dipping very slightly from 2008, when the test was last administered.”

 

NPR: Nation’s Report Card Finds Mixed Grades For U.S. Students In Visual Arts, Music

“For only the third time ever, the government released today a national report card examining the knowledge, understanding and abilities of U.S. eighth-graders in visual arts and music.  And in many ways, the numbers aren’t great, with little progress shown in most categories since the last time the assessment was given in 2008. One bright spot: The achievement gap between Hispanic students and their white peers has narrowed. But Hispanics and African-Americans still lag far behind white and Asian eighth-graders.”

New York Times: US Students Need More Exposure to Arts and Music, Test Shows

“When it comes to music and visual arts, American teenagers could use some help.  The National Center for Education Statistics reported Tuesday that in 2016, American eighth graders scored an average 147 in music and 149 in visual arts on a scale of 300. Some 8,800 eighth graders from public and private schools across the country took part in the test, which was part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, often called the Nation’s Report Card.”

Education Week: In MN and U.S., Teacher-Powered Schools Take Root

“At Impact Academy, one of a growing number of teacher-powered schools across the country, teachers’ fingerprints are all over the purple walls, even though they can’t really be seen. That’s because the school’s layout, its mission, the style of learning—everything is decided by the teachers themselves.  For longtime teacher Julene Oxton, the fingerprint analogy may even be literal: With family members, she tore down a classroom wall to make way for a different kind of learning environment.”

Artsy: ProjectArt Revives Childhood Art Education, with Help from Some Famous Names

“It’s a little-known scientific fact: Before they were famous, 100% of artists were kids. And, like most kids, they doodled, sculpted, finger-painted, and followed their wildest impulses without shame, second-guessing, or self-consciousness. Of course, they soon grew up and started taking artmaking more seriously—perhaps even referring to it by the rarified euphemism of ‘a practice.'”

 

Congress set to approve $2 million increase for the NEA
Congress has reached an agreement on FY17 funding that includes $150 million for the NEA, a $2 million increase over FY16. The omnibus agreement covers federal funding through the end of the fiscal year (September 30, 2017). The House and Senate are anticipated to pass the bill this week.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017

The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO: The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

Image Credit:

Chuck Richards, “Garden Hose” from “Jungle Gym Gitters”,  2004, colored pencil, courtesy of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Collection

Judy Schachner, “Dewey Bob” from “Dewey Bob”, 2016, mixed media, courtesy of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Collection

Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education – November 7

Save November 7, 2017 for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education’s Professional Development Day.  More details will be released in a couple months. For additional information email info@cincyartsalliance.org.

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Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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Arts on Line Education Update April 24, 2017

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Springfield News-Sun: State Superintendent visits Dome, Springfield High School

“The Ohio state superintendent toured The Dome and Springfield High School on Tuesday and said the local school district is doing a good job giving students an opportunity to learn in a unique environment.

‘Wonderful things are happening here,’ State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria said of The Dome. “We just spent some time talking to kids and you can tell they are excited and are engaged and they feel like it is making a difference.”  DeMaria, the leader of the Ohio Department of Education, came to Springfield because of a conversation between Springfield City Superintendent Bob Hill and State School Board President Tess Elshoff at a meeting in Columbus.”


Dayton Daily News: 5 things to know about how teachers are paid

“Dozens of local school districts are currently negotiating new contracts with their teachers unions, bringing discussions of teacher pay back to the forefront.  Each school district negotiates separately with its teachers to decide on a salary chart based on teachers’ education level and years of experience. That means two similar teachers can make dramatically different amounts of money depending on where they work.”


Youngstown Vindicator: CEO bringing back neighborhood schools concept

“Neighborhood schools are returning to Youngstown.  Youngstown City Schools CEO Krish Mohip is set to unveil his long-anticipated school reconfiguration plan today. He said a goal of bringing back neighborhood schools is to increase parental involvement.   ‘When we complain about parents not showing up and parental involvement, we have to consider that it’s really hard for them transportation wise when their kids’ schools are on the other side of the city,” Mohip said. “This is about getting the kids as close as possible to their schools.'”

 

Dayton Daily News: Retired Ohio teachers to lose cost of living increase

“Trustees for the State Teachers Retirement System of Ohio voted 10-1 on Thursday to indefinitely suspend the cost of living allowance given to retired teachers.  Retirees will no longer get a 2 percent COLA bump on their pensions for the foreseeable future.  The fix, though, may not be enough to shore up the finances of the $72-billion fund. ‘Even if we take this action, it’s only a 50-50 shot that it works,’ said STRS trustee James McGreevy, who argued for broader, deeper changes. McGreevy was the only no vote.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Impact of poor grades for big online schools could be cut in charter school oversight ratings

“State Rep. Andrew Brenner wants to ease the blow to charter school overseers made by the poor grades of giant online schools.  Brenner, chairman of the House Education Committee, plans to propose amendments to the state budget bill next week adjusting how the state rewards and penalizes the organizations that start and oversee charter schools.  The biggest change: He wants to do away with a requirement that the academic performance of the multiple charter schools in each overseer’s portfolio of schools be weighted by the number of students in each school.” 

 


 

OHIO STATEHOUSE

Ohio Legislators return from their two week spring break on Monday, April 24.

 


 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, April 25

10:00 a.m., Room 122

House State & Local Government Committee

HB134: SCHOOL GRANTS  (Hambley, S., Kick, D.)

Summary: To allow community improvements board grants to a school district to be spent for permanent improvements outside the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

1st Hearing – Sponsor

10:45 a.m., Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance: Primary & Secondary Education Subcommittee

Informal hearing on budget bill (HB49)

 

4:00 p.m., South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee

SB8: SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY & SAFETY (Gardner, R., Terhar, L.)

3rd Hearing – Opponent & interested party

 

SB82: SCHOOL ABSENCES (Williams, S., Lehner, P.)

3rd Hearing – All testimony

 

SB 4: ACADEMIC YEAR (Manning, G.)

3rd Hearing – All testimony

 

SB85: SCHOOL CHOICE (Huffman, M.)

2nd Hearing – Proponent

 

Thursday, April 27

10:00 a.m., Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance: Primary & Secondary Education Subcommittee

Informal hearing on budget bill (HB49)

 


 

NATIONAL NEWS

US Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos visited Van Wert City Schools Thursday, April 20, 2017.  Her support of private and charter schools has made DeVos a controversial pick for Education Secretary by the Trump administration.

 

Associated Press: Education secy, teachers union chief meet on school tour

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and the head of a national teachers union sought to find common ground as they toured public schools in Ohio, but differences remained.  The school visit came just months after American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten fiercely opposed the nomination of DeVos, a longtime advocate of charter and private schools. In the past Weingarten has accused DeVos of feeling ‘antipathy for public schools.'”

 

Toledo Blade: DeVos, union chief amicable on visit to northwest Ohio

“Barely a hint of the biting rhetoric lobbed at U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos by teachers’ unions and other public school advocates surfaced Thursday as she toured Van Wert City Schools alongside an ardent critic.  President Trump’s cabinet pick, controversial among many public school educators for her charter school support, spent several amicable hours in this rural northwest Ohio district with Randi Weingarten, president of the 1.6 million-member American Federation of Teachers.”

 

Washington Post: Teachers union hosts DeVos on visit to public schools in rural Ohio

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos visited an Ohio school district Thursday at the invitation of one of her chief critics, Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, who used the occasion to make a case for investment in public schools.  The two combatants in the nation’s education battles met for several hours, touring classrooms and hearing from teachers and students in Van Wert, a rural community of about 11,000 in northwestern Ohio. ”

 

More national news:

Washington Post: DeVos announces Education Department hires

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday announced the names of personnel who will serve in key leadership positions at the Education Department, a move that comes after she spent the first two months of her tenure operating with a skeletal beachhead team.  Serving as chief of staff is Josh Venable, who worked on former Florida governor Jeb Bush’s 2016 presidential campaign and for Bush’s Foundation for Excellence in Education. DeVos served on the board of the foundation, which sought to export the Florida model of education restructuring to other parts of the country.”

 


 

EDUCATION RESEARCH

Ohio State University: When it comes to reading, kindergarten is the new first grade

“A new nationwide study has found that children entering first grade in 2013 had significantly better reading skills than similar students had just 12 years earlier.  Researchers say this means that in general, children are better readers at a younger age, but the study also revealed where gaps remain – especially in more advanced reading skills.  The good news was that even low-achieving students saw gains in basic reading skills over this time period and actually narrowed the achievement gap with other young readers.”

 

University of Maryland: Arts Education and Positive Youth Development

“A new study from the University of Maryland indicates that adults who participated in music education in school in grades K-12 were more likely to attend a musical performance and play an instrument in later life. Education in other artistic disciplines, including theater, was also associated with participation in those disciplines later on in life.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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Arts On Line Education Update April 17, 2017

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING
April 10 & 11 

Graduation Requirements for class of 2018-2019

The State Board of Education voted to approve two additional graduation requirement options to assist the class of 2018-2019 in earning a high school diploma.  The two options were the product of the Graduation Requirements Workgroup, a special committee convened to address concerns that many in the 2018-2019 class would not meet the criteria needed to graduate under Ohio’s new requirements.  The Board approved recommendations now head to the General Assembly and can be viewed in their entirety here.

Recommendation 1

  • Complete all required high school courses
  • Take all required end-of-course exams; retake any ELA or Math test for which student scored a “1”
  • Meet two of the following eight conditions:
    • 93% attendance rate during senior year
    • 5 senior year GPA (min. 4 full yr. courses)
    • Capstone senior project defined by district
    • 120 hours senior year work experience/ community service
    • College Credit Plus course – 3 or more credits earned
    • IB/AP course and exam score earning college credit
    • 9 pts on WorkKeys exam (min. 3 pts. on each of three components
    • Earn State Board approved in-demand credential (3 pts or higher) 

Recommendation 2

  • Complete all required high school courses
  • Take all required end-of-course exams
  • Complete an Ohio Department of Education approved career-technical training program that includes 4 or more Vocational Technical (VT) courses
  • Complete one of the following:
    • Proficient or better on the total test score based on the average performance across career-tech program end-of-course exams or test modules (WebXams)
    • Earn State Board approved credential or group of credentials (12 pts. or higher)
    • Workplace participation: 250 hours; evidence of positive evaluations

The Associated Press:  Board wants more flexibility in Ohio graduation requirements

“The State Board of Education wants to give current high school juniors more flexibility in how they can earn a diploma amid educators’ warnings that too many of those students are at risk of not graduating next school year under Ohio’s new graduation requirements.  Because the Board’s authority is limited, it voted Tuesday to seek the Legislature’s permission to move ahead with such alternatives.”

Columbus Dispatch: State school board looks to recommend easing graduation requirements

“Hoping to prevent thousands of students from being denied a high-school diploma next year, the State Board of Education is urging lawmakers to mitigate new graduation requirements.  The board voted 16-3 Tuesday to ask legislators to sign off on a one-year bailout giving this year’s juniors who fall short on end-of-course exams other ways to earn a diploma.  The Class of 2018 is the first subject to the tough new benchmarks approved by the General Assembly in 2014 to ensure students are prepared for college or a job.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Students could graduate regardless of test scores under plan backed by state school board

“The state school board has lined up behind a proposal to avoid a graduation crisis for the class of 2018 by allowing students to earn diplomas regardless of their scores on state tests.  The plan backed by board members, with some limits, would create a one-year emergency exemption from the state’s new requirements that students score well on new state high school tests, in addition to passing the required classes, in order to earn a diploma.  It would let this year’s high school juniors, the first class affected by the new requirements, graduate by instead reaching some career training goals or by doing things like having strong attendance or classroom grades their senior year.”

 

Teacher Evaluation

The Board approved revisions to the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) Framework that would decrease the impact of student growth measures on teachers’ assessments, among other changes.  The six recommendations were developed by the Ohio Educator Standards Board. The Ohio Department of Education plans to present the recommendations to the General Assembly for approval and vote into law.

The six recommendations included:

  1. Update the OTES rubric.
  2. Embed the current student growth measures as sources of evidence within the rubric indicators in five of the ten specific domains in the OTES rubric: Knowledge of students, Differentiation, Assessment of student learning, Assessment data, and Professional responsibility.
  3. Remove shared attribution as it does not accurately measure individual teacher performance or student growth because the measure uses assessments for a cohort of students that the educator does not teach.
  4. Embed the Alternative Framework Components as sources of evidence in the revised OTES rubric by integrating alternate measures (like student surveys and portfolios) into the regular scoring rubric.
  5. Tailor the structure and timing of observations to meet the needs of teachers in order to focus on improvement and growth.
  6. Provide a professional growth process for teachers rated ‘Accomplished’ and ‘Skilled’ to include a teacher-directed professional growth plan for the ‘Accomplished’ teacher and a professional growth plan (PGP) for the ‘Skilled’ teacher.

The full report can be read here.

Dayton Daily News: Ohio looks to change teacher evaluation system

“Changes to the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System, moving away from mandatory grading of student growth on tests, are on track to be introduced in 2018-19 after the state school board approved a resolution Tuesday by a 15-4 vote.  The state’s Educator Standards Board worked for months on revisions to the OTES model, including language that ‘the evaluation system would no longer include student growth as a separate, weighted component rating.'”

 

Addressing Chronic Absenteeism  

The Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee continued their discussion on the development of a model policy for school districts to use in an effort to address chronic absenteeism.  With the passage of HB410 last December, schools cannot suspend or expel students for missing too much school beginning with the 2017-2018 school year.  Instead, districts must amend or adopt policies that outline their interventions and plans for students who miss too much school.   The School Board’s model policy for districts is due July 5 and guidance and training materials developed by the Ohio Department of Education must be completed by October 3.

Recommendations for addressing chronic absenteeism to date are as follows:

  • Generate and act on absenteeism data
  • Create and deploy positive messages and measures
  • Use a tiered system to target interventions and support
  • Focus communities on addressing chronic absenteeism
  • Ensure shared accountability throughout the whole community
  • Engage parents and families

 


ESSA STATUS UPDATE

During last week’s State Board of Education meeting, State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria outlined the timeline for Ohio’s plan to comply with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) September submission deadline.  Over the next two meetings, the State Board committees will review the ESSA plan along with the previous feedback from interested parties with the intent of the full Board approving the plan at the July meeting.  The plan would then be sent to Governor Kasich by August 18 to give him a full 30 days of review before the final Ohio ESSA plan would be officially submitted by the September 18 deadline.

(Earlier this year OAAE submitted specific recommendations to the State Board of Education on how Ohio’s ESSA Plan can be amended to support a well-rounded education, including the arts. Read OAAE’s recommendations here.)

The State Board Committees have been assigned the following sections for their review during the May and June State Board meetings:

Accountability & Continuous Improvement Committee

May Meeting:  21st Century (section G) & Homeless Children (I)

June Meeting:  Accountability/Improvement (A4) & Appendix A

Achievement & Graduation Requirements Committee

May Meeting:   School Conditions (A6) / School Transitions (A7) / English Language Learners (E)

June Meeting:  Eighth Grade Math Exception (A2) / Native Language Assessments (A3) / Rural and Low Income Schools (H)

Educators & Student Options Committee

May Meeting:   Access to Educators (A5)

June Meeting:  Effective Instruction (D)

Executive Committee

May Meeting:   Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk (C)

June Meeting:  Migratory Children (B) / Student Support/Enrichment Grants (F)

 


NEWS AROUND OHIO 

Plain Dealer: Lakewood City Schools earn national music education designation: A Place in the Sun

“Lakewood City Schools are among 4 percent of districts nationwide to receive the Best Communities for Music Education designation from The NAMM Foundation for its commitment to music education. School officials said the district’s and community’s commitment to music education is reflected in the new Performing Arts wing that will open in August at Lakewood High School. The new wing includes a band room, choir room, eight practice rooms, uniform and equipment storage rooms a keyboard lab and music library room.”

Columbus Dispatch: Will Ohio’s new high-school graduation exams doom poor kids to failure?

“It sounded like a good idea three years ago when state government leaders instituted new graduation exams to make sure kids were prepared for college or a job.  That is, until last fall, when state officials began to look at the sobering number of kids who could be denied a high-school diploma next year when the new requirements are to take effect.  Some districts and charter schools could see graduation rates plunge by as much as 70 percent, particularly those serving poor minority students. Some charters might not graduate a single student, according to projections compiled by the Ohio Department of Education in response to a superintendents’ march at the Statehouse.”

Lima News: DeVos to make scheduled visit to Van Wert schools

“Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos will make a visit to the Van Wert City School District on April 20.  ‘I look forward to visiting the students, parents and educators of Van Wert,’ DeVos said in a statement. ‘Every parent should be able to send their children to a school that meets their unique needs, and for many parents, that is a public school. I support and celebrate all great schools. I appreciate the district and American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten extending the invitation.'”

Columbus Dispatch: Database: New graduation standards

“Statewide, 66 percent of high school juniors have met, or are on track to meet, new graduation requirements. More are likely to qualify by next year as the class of 2018 is the first to face the higher benchmark for earning a diploma.  This database shows where Ohio districts stood in December.”

 

 


STATE BUDGET UPDATE

Columbus Dispatch: Kasich, lawmakers cutting $400 million a year from proposed state budget

“Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Republican legislative leaders are huddling to identify $400 million in annual cuts to the proposed two-year state budget amid still-sluggish economic growth.  ‘We’re going to look at all the options,” the governor said today. “Everything has to be under the microscope.’  Asked if any areas, such as schools, were immune from reductions in proposed funding in the $71 billion-a-year state budget, Kasich said: ‘The message is we’re not going to take anything off the table.'”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio legislators must trim $800 million from proposed biennial budget

“Ohio lawmakers will have to cut $800 million from the two-year budget they’re pounding out.  Gov. John Kasich, flanked by GOP legislative leaders and budget director Tim Keen, said Thursday that slow economic growth nationally and in Ohio are responsible for tax revenues lagging behind estimates.  As of the end of March, yearly tax revenue collections were $615 million below estimates, which were already revised downward in June.  At a Thursday news conference, Kasich, House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and Senate President Larry Obhof said nothing is off the table when considering what to cut. But they said state efforts to combat the state’s opioid abuse and overdose epidemic will not likely be affected.”

Toledo Blade: Kasich, GOP agree to cut budget $800M

“Gov. John Kasich and Republican legislative leaders on Thursday agreed to reduce Ohio’s spending by $800 million in the next two-year budget, making an already tight plan even tighter.  Mr. Kasich’s hope to include a fourth consecutive net tax cut is in danger.”

 


NATIONAL NEWS

WOSU: States want more career and technical training, but struggle to find teachers

“Two-thirds of states are currently reporting a shortage of CTE teachers in at least one specialty, according to a Stateline analysis of federal data.  Many Minnesota employers say they can’t find skilled workers with the right career training. Meanwhile, high schools are cutting career and technical education courses because they can’t find qualified teachers.” 

Washington Post: DeVos Praises This Voucher-Like Program. Here’s What It Means for School Reform

“Florida has channeled billions of taxpayer dollars into scholarships for poor children to attend private schools over the past 15 years, using tax credits to build a laboratory for school choice that the Trump administration holds up as a model for the nation.”

The Hill – Opinion: Why we need to continue funding the arts

“As a professional artist, curator and college art professor, I’ve witnessed firsthand the importance of the arts and the humanities. They play a vital role in modeling our perspectives and enriching our lives. The arts and humanities are not just a tool for personal expression or a way to mark celebrations, but they challenge our perceptions of society.  The arts and humanities inspire, challenge, and expand our minds.  They encourage us to think critically and allow us to experience the world through someone else’s reality.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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