Arts On Line Education Update May 14, 2018

OHIO ELECTION NEWS

Columbus Dispatch: Ohioans approved 68% of school levies in Tuesday’s election

“Statewide, voters approved 68 percent of the school levies on the primary ballot, passing 63 of 92 tax requests, according to unofficial results compiled by the Ohio School Boards Association.  The passage rate was on par with the average in primary elections over the past decade, but fewer issues were on ballots. Last year, there were 97. The number has been dropping since 2010, when 174 school levies were on ballots.”

OSBA’s database of school levy results is available here.

 

Associated Press: Ohio voters set governor matchup, OK map-making changes

“Ohio voters set up a matchup Tuesday between Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray in the fall governor’s race, picked a President Trump-backed U.S. Senate candidate and approved a ballot issue creating new rules for drawing congressional districts. The new rules, which will take effect with 2021 maps, were modeled after new map-making rules for Ohio legislative districts that Ohio voters strongly supported in 2016. Issue 1 won 75 percent of the statewide vote.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray turn the focus on each other in Ohio governor’s race

“The race to succeed term-limited Gov. John Kasich is the one most political observers predicted for months as Republican Attorney General Mike DeWine and Democratic former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray will face off in a rematch of the 2010 attorney general’s race.  Republicans are trying to maintain dominance in state government while Democrats are hungry to win a seat they’ve controlled for only four years since 1991. The race pits one of the longest-serving politicians in Ohio against a President Barack Obama appointee who many Democrats felt was their only hope at recapturing the governor’s office.”

 

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

OAAE’s current Legislative Update includes a review of federal FY18 appropriations and updates regarding  SB216 (the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act) and HB512 (Consolidate Career-Education Governance), which are both currently before the General Assembly.

OAAE has also produced a review of HB591 (Revise Report Card Rating System for Schools), proposes to change Ohio’s annual report card for school districts, school buildings, community schools, and STEM schools beginning in the 2018-19 school year.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation

HB630 (Galonski) GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

To extend the alternative graduation requirements established for the class of 2018 for two additional years

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, May 14

8:30 a.m. State Board of Education Meeting

Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus 

 

Tuesday, May 15

8:30 a.m. State Board of Education Meeting

Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

4:00 p.m. House Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

Ohio Statehouse Room 121

  • HB544 (Rogers, Perales) SCHOOL SAFETY STANDARDS 1st Hearing, Sponsor
  • SB216 (Huffman) SCHOOL REGULATIONS 1st Hearing, Sponsor 
  • HB517 (Schaffer, Leland) MONTH DESIGNATION 2nd Hearing, All testimony-Possible amendments & vote 
  • HB540 (Gavarone, Manning) TEACHER EVALUATIONS 3rd Hearing, All testimony-Possible amendments & vote 
  • HB591 (Duffey) SCHOOL REPORT CARDS 1st Hearing, Sponsor & proponent-Possible substitute-Pending referral

 

Wednesday, May 16

3:15 p.m. Senate Education Committee (Chair: Lehner)

Ohio Statehouse South Hearing Room

  • HB360 (Greenspan) BULLYING 1st Hearing, Sponsor
  • HB87 (Roegner) COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 2nd Hearing, Proponent
  • HB438 (Hambley, Kick) ESC BOARDS 2nd Hearing, All testimony-Possible amendments & vote
  • HB21 (Hambley) COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 5th Hearing, All testimony-Possible amendments & vote

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Bucyrus Telegraph: More mosaics: As Bucyrus students learn, their schools become more beautiful

“It all fits together. With help from Ohio Arts Council, a mosaic artist from Westerville is working with Bucyrus City Schools educators and students to create large-scale artworks to adorn walls at the district’s secondary and elementary buildings. Viki Murphy, who runs Vicki Murphy Mosaics, was hired to work at Bucyrus through the council’s Teach Arts Ohio program. She goes into Bucyrus schools every week to help teach students. “It’s been a great experience,” she said of working with the students.”

 

The Atlantic: One Ohio School’s Quest to Rethink Bad Behavior

“Many of Ohio Avenue’s children have brushed against violence and other traumatic experiences in their short lives—abuse and neglect, a household member addicted to drugs, homelessness, to name a few. At schools like this, a small dispute can easily turn into a scuffle that leads to an administrator or school-safety officer corralling the kids involved, if not suspending them. But Ohio Avenue is trying to find another way: Every adult in the building has received training on how children respond to trauma.”

 

US News & World Report: Best High Schools Rankings: Ohio High Schools

“Of the numerous Ohio schools ranked in 2018 among the U.S. News Best High Schools, 19 were awarded gold medals, 111 earned silver medals and 183 received bronze medals.”

The rankings are determined in part by consideration of the following:

  • Students exceeded expectations in their states.
  • Underserved students performed better than the state average.
  • Student graduation rates met a threshold.
  • Students were prepared for college-level coursework.

 

FYI ARTS

2018 AEP Annual Convening
stwebsite_1The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

okcc_1_orig.pngDestination Integration: ARTS Education 
Teacher Workshop, Grades 3-12 June 6 – 7, 2018 

Join teachers from around the state for fun, new and engaging instructional ideas taught by national John F. Kennedy Center teaching artists! The Ohio Kennedy Center Collaborative invites you to Wooster, Ohio for a 1 & 1/2 day conference on June 6-7.  Teachers will deepen their understanding and practice of arts integrated teaching to improve instruction and increase student learning through visual art and creative writing strategies. Enjoy the exploration of the creative process and the experience of the arts!

Dates: June 6-7, 2018
Cost: $65
Location: Wooster, OH
Graduate Credit is available through Ashland University

Download the printable flyer here.

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

 

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Arts On Line Education Update May 7, 2018

IT’S TEACHER APPRECIATION WEEK!

The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) invites all Ohioans to celebrate Teacher Appreciation Week and thank Ohio’s remarkable educators by sharing a story of a teacher or teacher team using  #OhioLovesTeachers on Twitter and Instagram.

Here is a rundown of the week’s daily themes from ODE:

  • Monday — Celebration Selfies: To kick-off the week of celebrating Ohio’s educators, let’s share some selfies! Using the shout-out banner, take a photo with an inspiring teacher and tell us what makes them great.
  • Tuesday — Wise Words: A lesson saved is a lesson learned! Recall a quote, saying or lesson from a favorite teacher. It may be witty, humorous, inspiring or all three. Share this wisdom on the shout-out banner, and then share with us!
  • Wednesday — Inspiration Flow Chart: Of course, teachers inspire us all. But, who inspires our teachers? Interview your favorite teacher and ask them to share their personal inspiration.
  • Thursday — Kindness Boomerang: Each day teachers inspire, create, motivate and heal. In the spirit of teachers’ never-ending kindness, perform a kind act for a teacher. Snap a photo of the moment, tag the teacher/school/district and share with us!
  • Friday — Lifelong Learning Journey: Teachers give us the maps on our lifelong learning journey. Tell us about a teacher from your K-12 years who gave you the directions to find success.

 

 

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

OAAE’s quarterly Legislative Update includes a review of federal FY18 appropriations and updates regarding SB216 (the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act) and HB512 (Consolidate Career-Education Governance), which are both currently before the General Assembly.

OAAE has also produced a review of HB591 (Revise Report Card Rating System for Schools), proposes to change Ohio’s annual report card for school districts, school buildings, community schools, and STEM schools beginning in the 2018-19 school year.

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

USDOE Seeking Literacy Grant Applications

The U.S. Department of Education expects to award more than $26 million in new literacy grants in September 2018. School districts interested in developing or improving library programs, offering early literacy services and providing quality books to low-income students to boost their reading performance can apply to the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) for a grant through the Innovative Approaches to Literacy program.

The agency started taking applications in April and will accept them through Friday, May 18. The Ohio Department of Education  is encouraging applicants to align their proposals with Ohio’s Plan to Raise Literacy Achievement.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Summer Food Service Program Sponsors and Sites Still Needed

“This year, the Ohio Department of Education wants to increase participation in summer meal programs. The Department is looking for local nonprofit agencies to serve as sponsors or sites to serve free meals to children. Summer food service sponsors and sites are especially needed in southern Ohio counties where families struggle with food insecurity, as well as in rural communities and areas where migrant families live. Sponsoring organizations receive reimbursements to cover the costs of nutritious meals and snacks to children in eligible areas.”

 

Opioids and Ohio Children: Tools for School Nurses

The Ohio Department of Health will host a conference on July 25 to give school nurses information and resources to support students with prenatal opioid exposure and trauma caused by family opioid abuse. Registration information is available here.

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Beacon Journal/Ohio.com editorial board: Standard behavior for Ohio

“The Akron Public Schools mobilized successfully to boost its high school graduation rate. District educators saw they had a problem at the start of the school year, just 54 percent of seniors on track to graduate. So they seized alternative pathways to a diploma defined by the state. On Monday, the district announced that it projects reaching a 93 percent graduation rate for the current school year.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

The 74: Analysis: Will Colorado Become the First State to Pass a School Transportation Law for Foster Kids Under ESSA

“A $2.9 million bill aimed at improving the educational success of foster youth could clear the Colorado House of Representatives as early as Tuesday and pass the state Senate later this week. If the bill is approved and signed by Gov. John Hickenlooper, Colorado will be the first state to legislate the implementation of a federal law that compels school systems to ensure that, among other things, foster kids have a ride to school. The Colorado Department of Human Services confirmed that the bill has the governor’s support.”

 

Brookings: Charter School Growth Puts Fiscal Pressure on Traditional Public Schools

“Policy debates about the net effects of charter schools on students and on the delivery of K-12 education are ongoing and remain highly contentious. In a recent paper, we contribute to the policy discussion by drawing attention to the fiscal externalities of charter schools, a finance topic that deserves more attention in the overall discussion. Fiscal externalities are the additional burden that charter schools place on the budgets of traditional school districts, and we find evidence that they are consequential in North Carolina.”

 

 

FYI ARTS

2018 AEP Annual Convening
stwebsite_1The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

okcc_1_orig.pngDestination Integration: ARTS Education 
Teacher Workshop, Grades 3-12 June 6 – 7, 2018 

Join teachers from around the state for fun, new and engaging instructional ideas taught by national John F. Kennedy Center teaching artists! The Ohio Kennedy Center Collaborative invites you to Wooster, Ohio for a 1 & 1/2 day conference on June 6-7.  Teachers will deepen their understanding and practice of arts integrated teaching to improve instruction and increase student learning through visual art and creative writing strategies. Enjoy the exploration of the creative process and the experience of the arts!

Dates: June 6-7, 2018
Cost: $65
Location: Wooster, OH
Graduate Credit is available through Ashland University

Download the printable flyer here.

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update April 30, 2018

2018 OHIO GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION

Candidates Share their Education Plans
The May 8 primaries are quickly approaching, and the Columbus Dispatch recently published the education policy positions of the Ohio gubernatorial candidates.  

Columbus Dispatch: Two GOP Candidates for Governor Take on Education Issues
“Attorney General Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor agree that Ohio schools must be held accountable for preparing children to succeed in a rapidly changing economy, and the state must provide the necessary resources for a quality education.”

Columbus Dispatch: Democratic Candidates for Governor Have Big Plans for Education
“Four Democrats are seeking their party’s nomination for governor, and all have ambitious plans for improving Ohio’s education system and preparing students for jobs of the future.”

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) STEM Committee recently approved the addition of 10 new STEM schools. The committee voted to approve the designation for the following schools for the next academic year:

  • Bishop Flaget School (Ross Country)
  • Boulevard Elementary School (Cleveland Heights-University Heights City Schools, Cuyahoga County)
  • Gesu Catholic School (Cuyahoga County)
  • Graham Elementary School (Graham Local Schools, Champaign County)
  • Graham Middle School (Graham Local Schools, Champaign County)
  • Lander Elementary School (Mayfield Local Schools, Cuyahoga County)
  • Orchard STEM School (Cleveland Metro Schools, Cuyahoga County)
  • Joseph School (Lorain County)
  • Southdale Elementary School (Kettering City Schools, Montgomery County)
  • STEAMM Academy @ Hartford Middle School (Canton City Schools, Stark County)
  • Tentative approval: I Promise School (Akron City Schools, Summit County)

Schools interested in the STEM designation for the 2018-2019 school year were required to submit proposals earlier in the school year that for included:

  • Evidence of a working partnership with both public and private entities, including higher education entities and business organizations; (If the proposal was for a STEAM school, this partnership must include arts organizations.)
  • Evidence that the school submitting the proposal will offer a rigorous, diverse, integrated and project-based curriculum to students that emphasizes the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. (If the proposal was for a STEAM school, schools must also specifically demonstrate how the curriculum will integrate arts and design.)

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Federal Government Releases Civil Rights Data
The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) released the 2015-16 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC). This data, which is self-reported by 17,300 public school districts and 96,400 public schools and educational programs, is collected and published biennially by OCR. The CRDC collects a variety of information including student enrollment and educational programs and services. For the first time, the 2015-16 CRDC report includes comprehensive data regarding incidents of criminal offenses in our nation’s public schools. It also includes several new categories of data on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) course taking.

 

 

 OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer: How much are teachers paid in Ohio? Search here for your district
“Ohio’s pay for teachers is in the middle of the pack nationally, ranking 21st out of the 50 states two years ago in a respected national roundup of school data. Statewide, the average teacher pay for the 2016-17 school year was $58,849 and the median was $56,117, according to the Ohio Department of Education. But teachers have very different pay in different districts.”

Columbus Dispatch: Special signing ceremonies enhance Olentangy district’s reputation as military-friendly
“Tuesday afternoon was Orange High School’s first military-signing ceremony, similar to the signing ceremonies that high schools hold for student-athletes to sign letters of intent for their chosen colleges. Olentangy Superintendent Mark Raiff got choked up at points as he read the U.S. Army Soldier’s Creed in the auditorium at Orange High School. ″… I will never quit. I will never leave a fallen comrade …” Raiff told the 13 Orange students sitting at a table next to him that he was honored to share the stage with them and that incredible opportunities await them.” 

Washington Post: Opioid deaths prompt Ohio to reimagine classroom lessons, starting with kindergarten
“Ohio, a state where 4,329 people died of drug overdoses in 2016, a death rate second only to neighboring West Virginia, is taking the fight against the opioid epidemic into the classroom with a new style of drug-abuse-prevention education. Ohio’s plan, controversial in a state that prizes local control over schools, features lessons that begin in kindergarten.”

 

 

FYI ARTS

2018 AEP Annual Convening
stwebsite_1The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

okcc_1_orig.pngDestination Integration: ARTS Education 
Teacher Workshop, Grades 3-12 June 6 – 7, 2018 

Join teachers from around the state for fun, new and engaging instructional ideas taught by national John F. Kennedy Center teaching artists! The Ohio Kennedy Center Collaborative invites you to Wooster, Ohio for a 1 & 1/2 day conference on June 6-7.  Teachers will deepen their understanding and practice of arts integrated teaching to improve instruction and increase student learning through visual art and creative writing strategies. Enjoy the exploration of the creative process and the experience of the arts!

Dates: June 6-7, 2018
Cost: $65
Location: Wooster, OH
Graduate Credit is available through Ashland University

Download the printable flyer here.

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Congratulations to our grantees!

2017 Weinland Park Sewing Circle (4)The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education’s Franklin County Neighborhood Arts program awards grants three times a year. Awards of up to $2,000 support community organizations in providing accessible arts experiences to county residents.

The following groups received grants in the most recent round of funding:

Canal Winchester Art Guild – $500
Give a Bird a Home at Walnut Creek
Final phase of a school-based study of ornithology, culminating in a public art installation.

Community Development for All People – $500
Community Mural for Fresh Market
Community mural for the CD4AP’s new Fresh Market on Parson’s Avenue.

Ohio Designer Craftsmen – $700
Crafting for Community
Hands-on community artmaking events creating functional items to benefit central Ohioans in need.

Second Sight Project Inc. – $900
Summer Video Screenings and Workshops
Creation of a short documentary reflecting on Second Sight’s “As Seen In Franklinton” project. In conjunction with this documentary, Second Sight will offer community workshops on video editing. All resulting videos will be screed at informal community events, paired with other children’s shorts.

 

The next deadline for the Franklin County Neighborhood Arts grant is May 31. Application materials are available online.

 

Photo credit: 2017 FCNA grantee Weinland Park Sewing Circle

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Arts On Line Education Update April 23, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Recently Introduced Legislation

HB609 STUDENT EXPULSIONS (Hughes) With respect to the expulsion of a student from a school district, community school, or STEM school for communicating a threat of violence to occur on school grounds.

HB611 SCHOOL PAYMENTS (Faber, Roegner) To condition payment from the Department of Education to an Internet or computer-based community school on the school’s use of automatically verifiable software that tracks attendance, class size, and participation.

HB606 TAX EXEMPTION (Patterson, LaTourette) To authorize a property tax exemption for land used for commercial maple sap extraction and to reimburse, up to $3 million per year, local governments for revenue lost from the exemption.

 

Joint Education Oversight Committee

The Joint Education Oversight Committee heard a presentation on measuring student growth from North Carolina-based analytics firm SAS Institute.  The SAS Institute is an education vendor contracted by the Ohio Department of Education to report student growth measures on school district report cards. John White, SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System senior director, said measuring growth is important and can paint a more accurate picture than measuring achievement. In many cases achievement measurement results are negatively correlated to the percentage of economically disadvantaged students in a district.

Rep. Duffey voiced concern with what he called a ‘proprietary formula’ used by SAS to determine the grades for student progress as well as concern with the difficulty districts encounter in understanding the results. White indicated that while practices used to determine student growth algorithm are complicated, they are indeed public. Recently, Duffey has proposed eliminating the state’s existing A-F report card system (HB591) and replacing it with what he refers to as a “dashboard” with key, easily comparable information.

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Should school districts get an A-F grade? State report card overhaul debated

“The state’s report cards are coming under fire on two fronts this spring, which could wipe out their A-F grades and force the state to rate schools and districts very differently. A state school board panel and a new bill in the Ohio House are both seeking to make major changes to the report cards, which were just redesigned in 2013 and are still being phased in. “Nobody likes the current Ohio school district report card,” State Rep. Mike Duffey told the House Education Committee last week, as he presented details of the bill, House Bill 591.”

 

Associated Press: Bug in online system puts school testing on pause

“Standardized testing has been placed on hold at some Ohio schools over login issues with the online system. A spokeswoman with the state Department of Education says officials learned Wednesday morning of an issue with American Institutes for Research, the vendor that distributes the tests. School district officials received emails around 9:30 a.m. saying there were problems for students logging in to take the tests and that students currently taking tests weren’t affected.”

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

stwebsite_1

2018 AEP Annual Convening: Call for Session Proposals 

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1. 

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Education Week: NAEP: Do the Data Show That ‘Education Reform’ Has Worked—Or That It Hasn’t?

“The April 1st Washington Post carried an op-ed by Arne Duncan, President Obama’s Secretary of Education titled, “People are saying education reform hasn’t worked. Don’t believe them.” On April 10, Education Week announced the most recent results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress with the following headline: “Achievement Flattens as Gaps Widen Between High and Low Performers.”

 

News from Tennessee: Haslam announces $1 million music and arts education initiative

“Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today announced a partnership with the Country Music Association (CMA) Foundation to launch a $1 million competitive grant opportunity focused on expanding students’ access to high-quality music and arts education.  Tennessee: State of the Arts is a first of its kind public-private partnership to ensure more students across the state of Tennessee will have access to a quality arts and music education. School districts in Tennessee will have the opportunity to apply for funding to improve or develop their music education programs. The statewide initiative will kick-off with the 2018-19 school year.”

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

okcc_1_orig.pngDestination Integration: ARTS Education 
Teacher Workshop, Grades 3-12 June 6 – 7, 2018 

Join teachers from around the state for fun, new and engaging instructional ideas taught by national John F. Kennedy Center teaching artists! The Ohio Kennedy Center Collaborative invites you to Wooster, Ohio for a 1 & 1/2 day conference on June 6-7.  Teachers will deepen their understanding and practice of arts integrated teaching to improve instruction and increase student learning through visual art and creative writing strategies. Enjoy the exploration of the creative process and the experience of the arts!

Dates: June 6-7, 2018
Cost: $65
Location: Wooster, OH
Graduate Credit is available through Ashland University

Download the printable flyer here.

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update April 16, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Education and Career Readiness Committee (Chair: Brenner)

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week: 

Proponent testimony on HB540 TEACHER EVALUATIONS (Gavarone, Manning) With regard to teacher evaluations.

Several proponents testified last week in favor of the teacher evaluation changes in HB 540.  Supporters included Melissa Cropper, president of the Ohio Federation of Teachers, and Jonathan Juravich, an elementary school art teacher who is also the Department of Education’s 2018 Ohio Teacher of the year.

“Ohio teachers are currently working under an evaluation system that uses testing data in an inappropriate and ineffective way to evaluate teachers by counting test results as a percentage of a teacher’s evaluation,” Cropper said.

The legislation consists of recommendations provided by the Educator Standards Board after reviewing the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System.

The proposal would include the following changes:

  1. Update OTES Rubric to embed student growth indicators, clarify descriptors to decrease redundancy, and improve clarity in the distinctions between performance levels.
  1. Student growth data will be linked with improving instruction, as opposed to an isolated evaluation factor linked to an arbitrary percentage.
  1. Shared attribution would be removed as it does not accurately measure teacher performance or student growth because of the use of assessments for a group of students that the educator does not teach.
  1. Alternative framework components like student portfolios, student surveys, peer review, self-evaluation, and district-determined measures, will remain as optional sources of evidence of teacher effectiveness.
  1. For teachers on a full evaluation cycle, the two required formal observations and optional number of walkthroughs will be maintained, along with a required end of annual cycle conference with the evaluator.
  1. The off-year evaluation schedule for teachers rated skilled or accomplished will be maintained but adds the requirement of a conference in off-years for skilled and accomplished teachers to discuss professional growth and progress toward goals. There would also be a requirement for teachers who are rated as skilled to submit professional growth plans developed with their evaluations in off years.

“HB540 would make the OTES process more coherent,” said Mr. Juravich. “By using student growth measures as a source of evidence in the conversations between educator and evaluator, we are emphasizing the importance of our impact on our students.”

 

Sponsor testimony on HB549 SCHOOL YEAR (Arndt) To generally require public and chartered nonpublic schools to open for instruction after Labor Day.

Bill sponsor Rep. Steven Arndt (R-Port Clinton) said the measure to require schools to begin after Labor Day would give students a boost by allowing school-age children opportunities to pursue work experiences and address the state’s “workforce shortage and skills gap.” He also noted that a later starting date would keep students out of school during the hottest days of the year.

Arndt acknowledge the concern of passing another state mandate down to schools, but said he added a provision that would allow local control. School Boards can opt out of the mandate if they conduct one local hearing at least one month before the start date to allow the public to voice their concern.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB591 SCHOOL REPORT CARDS (Duffey) To revise the state report card rating system for school districts and public schools.

Representative Mike Duffey laid out a plan for an Ohio School Report Card reform last week. Duffey testified that the current report card system left districts frustrated, damaged teacher morale, and confused parents and the community. His proposal outlined the principles the new report card would include to make it more effective than the current one:

  • Dashboard approach: precise information presented in an intuitive format for natural response
  • Understandable: use the simplest methodologies that still get the job done/illustrate the metric
  • Transparent: educators/public can do the math themselves if they want, which leads to trust
  • Parent-centric: present the data to parents so they see how their children are likely to do, as opposed to looking at all children generally

Duffey indicated his work in developing HB591 has included discussions with many partners including the Joint Education Oversight Committee, State Board of Education members, the Ohio Department of Education, various school associations and parents.  The full presentation on the proposed changes can be reviewed here.

 

Passed by the House:

  • HB318 (LaTourette, Patterson) It establishes qualifications and training for school resource offices and includes a $10 million school safety training grant.
  • HB360 (Greenspan) The bill sets a standard framework for schools to use an even-handed approach to address bullying.

  

Senate Education Committee (Chair: Lehner)

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

All testimony on HB21 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS (Hambley) Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

The committee heard several proposed amendments from witnesses. Among them was Michael Uhrin, president of Grove City-based K12 School Consultants, who asked for amendments that would allow local school districts to join in the verification process.  “Charter schools may not have the necessary staff to review court and other legal documents,” he said. “Many public schools have legal staff to review these documents.”

HB21 takes the onus of verifying residency of community school students from public schools and would instead require charter schools to keep track of the home districts in which their students reside. HB21 changes the obligation from the public schools to community schools on the foundation that each school should only be responsible for verifying the residency of the students they serve.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB87 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS (Roegner) Regarding public moneys returned to the state as a result of a finding for recovery issued pursuant to an audit of a community school.

Rep. Kristina Roegner told the committee that HB87 provides the Department of Education with specific guidance on distributing funds returned to the state from a community school as the result of a finding for recovery from the Auditor of State.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB438: ESC BOARDS (Hambley, Kick) To permit the addition of appointed members to educational service center boards and to permit a local school district to sever its territory from one educational service center and annex that territory to an adjacent service center under specified conditions.

Co-sponsors Rep. Steve Hambley and Rep. Darrell Kick both testified and explained the three provisions of the bill. HB438 passed the House with a unanimous vote last month.

 

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

April 9 & 10 Meeting Recap

In-School Health Care Initiative

Superintendent Paolo DeMaria discussed an initiative intended to give support to school districts who want to establish in-house health care. DeMaria said ODE has been working with the Ohio Departments of Health and Jobs & Family Services as well as other health care organizations to develop the School-Based Health Care Support Toolkit. The draft tool kit will be available in May with the goal of having services ready to support schools by September.

“Let’s work together to help improve the health status of students in the interest of helping them become better learners,” DeMaria said Monday. “We know a lot about the interdependency between student health and academic performance. Whether it’s asthma, diabetes, a tooth ache, not having corrective eyewear — these have huge impacts on their readiness and ability to participate.” The program will focus on patient management, care coordination and mental health.

 

Chronic Absenteeism on Ohio School Report Cards

The Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee voted in favor of adding chronic absenteeism improvement as an indicator on the schools’ state report cards. The new measurement is part of Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan and will look at absentee rates with a focus on measuring improvement in the reduction of students missing regularly. Chronic Absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the school year for any reason, which is approximately 18 days of school. Currently Ohio’s rate is 16.9 percent.

Schools can meet the new indicator in one of two pathways ways. The first is by reaching a target goal set by the state. This goal would start at an absentee rate of 13.6 percent and drop each year to the final goal of 5 percent for the 2025-2026 school year. The second pathway would be for schools to see incremental improvement based on their current absentee rate, or Baseline Chronic Absenteeism Improvement Standard. For schools with a 36.7 percent or higher chronic absenteeism rate, they would need to see a 1.1 percent decrease. For schools with an absenteeism rate of 36.7 percent  or lower, they would need to improve by 3 percent.

The chronic absenteeism indicator will be up for full board approval in May and inclusion on the next round of state report cards in the upcoming 2018-2019 school year.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE Seeks Public Comment on Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education

The last chance to submit comment on the recently released draft of the state’s five-year strategic plan is this week. The final regional community conversation to discuss the plan directly with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Ohio Department of Education staff is scheduled for Tuesday, April 17 in Hamilton County.

The Ohio Department of Education and State Board of Education’s plan is a tool to inform policy development at the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools. More than 150 preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, and philanthropic organizations worked collaboratively over the last six months to develop the plan.

For more information and to register for the last regional community comment session, click on the following link: Hamilton County: April 17, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

 

Dayton Daily News: State considers new 5-year education plan that shifts away from tests

“The Ohio Department of Education is constructing a new five-year strategic plan — dubbed Each Child = Our Future — aimed at building a more effective state education system to help position students for success upon graduation. A draft version of the plan earned praise from some for moving away from emphasizing test results.”

Lima News: Meeting held in Wapak to discuss Ohio’s education plan

“The future of Ohio’s education is being discussed across the state as the State Board of Education holds stakeholder meetings on a new strategic plan. A meeting held Wednesday at Wapakoneta High School gave people a chance to weigh in on a draft strategic plan that is being considered.”

 

 

OHIO NEWS

The National Assessment of Educational Progress’s (NAEP) latest National Report Card was recently released and has Ohio at the same level as the past couple years. The NAEP is the largest continuing and nationally representative assessment of what our nation’s students know and can do in subjects such as mathematics, reading, science, and writing. Standard administration practices are implemented to provide a common measure of student achievement.

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio and Cleveland gain little on “Nation’s Report Card,” as national scores stay flat

“Ohio and other states gained little to nothing on the national test last year that serves as the “Nation’s Report Card,” showing no significant improvements in reading or math, even as states continue pressing education reform efforts like more aggressive teacher evaluations and the shift to new Common Core-based standards.”


Columbus Dispatch: Ohio reading, math scores unchanged on national test

“U.S. eighth-graders in 2017 were slightly better readers than the eighth-graders of 2015. But other than that bright spot, national test scores on reading and math haven’t budged in a few years. Likewise, Ohio’s scores didn’t really move in the two years since fourth- and eighth-graders last took the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the results of which were released early Tuesday. This after results had dipped a little in 2015.”

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

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2018 AEP Annual Convening: Call for Session Proposals 

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1. 

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Portrait of an Arts Advocate: David Bell

David Bell 14 (002)David Bell
Co-Chair, Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education
Instructor, Miami University 
Retired, Public School High School Choir Teacher

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: I grew up as a “PK” or “Preacher’s Kid.” My father was a minister and my mother was a Kindergarten teacher. As a child, I spent countless hours hanging around the church waiting for my parents to finish up meetings. Music was the part of that environment that first grabbed my attention as an overly-energetic, primary student. My mother had basic piano skills and we would often play duets together. My father also had music skills and, prior to my birth, played percussion in the West Point Marching Band during WWII.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: The moment that comes to mind was the first opportunity my high school students had to perform with Maestro Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops. We were on the program to perform and record the “Dedication and Wind Song,” from the Disney movie, “Mighty Joe Young,”  (Mega Movies, Telarc Digital, 2000).  As these students, many of whom had never before had the opportunity to visit Cincinnati’s Music Hall, stood on the stage preparing to rehearse with Maestro Kunzel, I realized that for the rest of their lives they would return to that special place, not as “guests,” but rather as “owners” of an irreplaceable musical memory and an intimate connection with a world-class orchestra. I realize now how brilliant Erich Kunzel, and his successor, John Morris Russell, are, to bring these students to the stage first as active participants, rather than passive audience members.

Q. How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A:  Since retiring from 35 years of public school teaching, I have been working with student teachers for the past four years at Miami University, Oxford, and teaching a class designed to improve student literacy through the musical and visual arts. I am also currently serving as Co-Chair for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education. The GCAAE is an organization of the arts education administrators for Cincinnati area arts organizations, such as the Cincinnati Symphony, Ballet, Art Museum, Shakespeare Theatre, etc., formed to “advocate for the arts in people’s lives.” GCAAE is a pilot member of the Local Arts Education Network of the Americans for the Arts.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: I have always been intrigued by the power of sensory engagement, particularly in video games. Video games trigger neurological chemical responses that help to raise the level of engagement in processes that are often like learning processes that occur in the classroom. Recently, I have been investigating ways that we can capitalize upon neuro-sensory immersion to promote student engagement in the classroom. This is, undoubtedly, one of the great strengths of arts infusion in education and lesson planning.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: The choir director at our church, Rev. Paul Waters, was a talented organist who had graduated from Northwestern University and built an enormous choir program at the church where my father was assigned. The holidays were memorable times when all the singers would join together in one massed choir with brass, organ, hand bells, and percussion. Dr. Waters would conduct the combined forces of over 350 people by simply nodding his head while playing at the organ keyboard. It was a pivotal time when I learned the ability of music to overpower the spoken word and speak directly to the heart.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: One of the best tips I learned about advocacy was from a former Winton Woods City Schools Superintendent. Dr. Thomas Richey. As he was helping me to prepare to testify for the Ohio State School Board, he shared that his most effective approach was to figure out “who influences the influencers?” He taught me not to worry so much about directly influencing a legislator or elected official, but think about who influences them–it may be their spouse, their family, their staff, their funders, etc. Build a relationship with the person who influences the influencer and help them to see the value of strong arts education through your personalized lens.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you’d like to submit your information, or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

 

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