Arts On Line Education Update October 16, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee (Chair: Brenner)

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Proponent and opponent testimony on HB200 This bill would eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.  The proposed scholarship program would make vouchers available to all students with family incomes at or below 400% of the federal poverty level. 

The League of Women voters along with several school management organizations including the Ohio School Boards Association, the Buckeye Association of School Administrators and the Ohio Association of School Business Officials testified in opposition to the bill.  “Voucher programs lack the academic accountability of public schools,”  Jennifer Hogue, director of legislative services for the Ohio School Boards Association, told the Committee.  “Further, voucher programs drain scarce resources that could be best utilized by Ohio’s public schools where the vast majority of Ohio’s students are educated. At a time when Ohio is experiencing scarce resources, further diversion of public funds to private education institutions is highly objectionable.”

Proponent Josh Brown from Citizens for Community Values defended HB200 saying “Ohio will take a significant step forward in offering all families something that only wealthy families currently have access to: a chance to go to the school of their own choosing.”  Nearly 15 other proponent testimonies were heard by the Committee, most of which were parents currently using Ohio’s voucher system.

Sponsor testimony on HB318 John Patterson (D-Jefferson) and Sarah LaTourette (R-Chesterland) testified on their bill designed to define certain qualifications and responsibilities for school resource officers.  Patterson told the committee “Should HB318 become law, SROs must complete a training program approved by the Ohio Peace Officer’s Training Commission as well as an additional 40 hours of training that includes instruction regarding skills, tactics, and strategies.”

Sponsor testimony on HB338 Timothy E. Ginter (R-Salem) testified that this bill would amend current law to include licensed chiropractors as medical professionals who are qualified to perform an annual physical exam for school bus drivers under Ohio Revised Code Section 3327.

Reported out of Committee: HB98 This bill addresses establishing minimum access standards for the presentation of career information to students in grades 9 through 12.

 

Senate Education Committee (Chair: Lehner)

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Sponsor testimony on SB196 Bill sponsor Sen. Sandra Williams (D-Cleveland) testified that this legislation would require a tiered disciplinary procedure for harassment, intimidation or bullying in school.  Williams outlined the approach in her written testimony:

The several steps to address bullying are as follows:

  1. Warning
  2. Peer Mediation
  3. Parent Meeting
  4. In school suspension
  5. Out of school suspension
  6. Third-degree Misdemeanor

The bill also would require annual student instruction about bullying prevention.  “While the threat of harsher penalties will not in itself deter people from bullying others; our hope is that the offender will weigh the costs and benefits of their behavior and will ultimately act in a way that maximizes acceptable behavior while minimizing emotional and physical pain against others,” Sen Williams told the Committee. “The goal of this legislation idea is prevention not punishment.”

Proponent testimony on HB170 Under the bill, the State Board of Education would create academic content standards and a model curriculum for computer science. The legislation adds computer science instruction as an option in lieu of certain elective, science and math subjects, including Algebra II as well as addresses educator qualifications for teaching computer science.

 

House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee

Sponsor testimony on HB342 This bill would permit local tax-related proposals to appear only on general and primary election ballots and not on an August special election ballot and also modifies the information conveyed in election notices and ballot language for property tax levies. 

 

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee

The committee amended Substitute SB3 to be identical to Substitute HB166.  The bills designate the first full week in May as ‘In-Demand Jobs Week’ and specifies that the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation will organize activities to raise awareness among educators, students and parents of jobs that are in demand.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation: SB216 – Bill Summary

Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima) introduced the Public School Deregulation Act (SB216), which would make changes to testing, teacher evaluations, staffing policies, reporting requirements and more.  This bill, which was put together with the help of superintendents in Huffman’s district, would also allow teachers to teach outside of their licensed certification in particular cases and remove the 30 hour annual professional development requirement for teaching gifted children.

Dayton Daily News: School leaders, lawmaker seek to reduce state mandates

“School leaders in the area are pushing for more flexibility to reduce costly and cumbersome state mandates.  They cover everything from testing to truancy.  The drive to make changes is starting now with the help of a state lawmaker.  “What we’re trying to do is returning the management of the schools to the local level,” said State Sen. Matt Huffman, R-Lima, whose district includes Champaign, Mercer and Shelby counties and parts of Auglaize, Darke and Logan counties.” 

 

Speaker’s Task Force on Education and Poverty

The task force heard presentations from educational leaders on the work being done to positively impact the students in the state’s dropout recovery and intervention schools.  Former state Rep. Jim Buchy, senior advisor at the Batchelder Co.; Todd Whiteman, superintendent of the dropout recovery Foxfire Schools; and Cris Gulacy-Worrel, vice president of national expansion for the Learn4Life dropout recovery schools all testified.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, October 16

8:30 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Tuesday, October 17

8:30 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Wednesday, October 18

3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

SB216 Huffman, 1st Hearing (pending referral)

Enact Public School Deregulation Act-primary/secondary ed-testing

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Bullying prevention – what can teachers and principals do?

“We all know that bullying among students can cause distractions and roadblocks to learning. Since October is Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, now is a great time for classroom teachers and principals to look at year-round strategies for preventing negative behaviors and enhancing the school environment. Check out this new webpage at education.ohio.gov, which highlights toolkits for related schoolwide activities and classroom lessons.”

Sandy Hook Promise to hold Say Something Week, Oct. 16-20

“Sandy Hook Promise, a national violence prevention program, is sponsoring its third annual ‘Say Something Week’, Oct. 16-20. The Say Something program teaches students in grades 6-12 how to look for warning signals and threats — especially in social media — from individuals who may want to hurt themselves or others. The program encourages children to say something to a trusted adult to get help.”

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s 100 top high schools ranked for 2017

“Which high school is the best in Ohio? That’s a complicated question in which a number of factors would have to be considered. But when it comes to pure test results released as part of the 2017 state school report cards, a high school outside of Dayton comes out No. 1 for the state’s Performance Index.  The Performance Index reported for public schools by the Ohio Department of Education is a measure of how highly students score on a series of tests.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Performance grades for career-tech uncertain over ‘compilation error’

“Career-technical schools might be performing better or worse than the grades the state issued for them in mid-September.  Students were accidentally excluded from some calculations that made up the state report card, the Ohio Department of Education informed the schools in late September.  The impact should be minimal on most schools, said spokeswoman Brittany Halpin in an emailed statement.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

AP / US News & World Report: DeVos Touts School Choice, STEM for $4 Billion in Grants

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has put forth a new set of priorities for states, schools and universities competing for federal grant money.  The priorities include school choice, science and technology, special education and school safety.  The Education Department awards approximately $4 billion per year in new and continuation competitive grants across some 80 programs, the agency said Thursday. Education secretaries have historically used these competitions to push their priorities.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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