Arts on Line Education Update May 9, 2016

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
May 9, 2016
Joan Platz

 

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

131st General Assembly: The House and Senate will hold voting sessions and committee meetings this week.

 

The House Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education, chaired by Representative Duffey, will meet on May 10, 2016 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 311 to receive testimony on HB474 (Brown) Higher Education Mid Biennium Review (MBR).  The bill amends laws pertaining to higher education to increase accessibility and reduce costs.

 

The House Finance Committee, chaired by Representative Ryan Smith, will meet on May 10, 2016 at 1:00 PM in hearing room 313.  The committee will receive testimony on HB547 (Smith) Office of Budget and Management MBR. The bill deals with state finances, and includes budget corrections and programmatic changes.

 

The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Brenner, will meet on May 10, 2016 at 1:30 PM in hearing room 018.  The committee will receive testimony on the following bills:

-HB487 (LaTourette, Roegner) State Seal-Bi-literacy:  Requires the State Board of Education to establish the state Seal of Bi-literacy to be attached or affixed to the high school transcripts of qualifying students.

-HB459 (Schuring) Educational Service Center-Audit:  Authorizes the Auditor of State to conduct a performance audit of an educational service center, and requires a comprehensive performance audit of all educational service centers.

-HB146 (Grossman, Brenner) Requires instruction in cursive handwriting.

 

The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, will meet on May 10, 2016 at 3:00 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room.  The committee will receive testimony on a number of bills, including SB298 (Schiavoni) Charter Schools-Contracts, which would change the requirements for operating Internet- and computer-based community schools; SB247 (Brown-Lehner) School District-Summer Meals; and SB274 (Seitz) SmartOhio Financial Literacy Pilot Program.

 

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on May 10, 2016 at 4:00 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will receive testimony on the following bills:

-HB113 (Grossman, Manning) CPR-Graduation Requirement:  Requires instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the use of an automated external defibrillator.

-SB234 (Cafaro) Student Enrollment-Children Services:  Requires specified public and nonpublic school officials to search the Uniform Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System.

-SB297 (Hughes) Student-Violent Threat: Creates a process to address a situation in which a student threatens violence on school grounds.

 

The Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission will meet on May 12, 2016 at 1:30 PM in hearing room 313.  The Education, Public Institutions, and Local Government Committee is not scheduled to meet.

 

LAST WEEK AT THE STATEHOUSE

The Ohio House approved the following bills of interest last week:

-SB310 (Oelslager) Capital Appropriations:  The bill now goes to the governor to sign into law.  It includes $2.62 billion to support capital improvements and other initiatives in the following areas:

-Institutions of higher education ($537 million)

-K-12 buildings, through the Ohio School Facilities Commission ($650 million)

-Local infrastructure through the Public Works Commission ($500 million), including $100 million for Clean Ohio projects

-Improvements to dams, state parks and forests under the Department of Natural Resources allotment ($323 million)

-Community projects ($160 million), including projects in the arts

-The Department of Rehabilitation and Correction ($150.8 million)

-Health and human services and Youth Services facilities ($100 million)

-Transportation projects ($100 million)

-The Department of Administrative Services ($68.5 million)

-HB410 (Rezabek, Hayes) Truancy: Revises Ohio’s laws about truancy to keep students in school and facilitate schools and parents working together to support students.  The bill provides a more holistic approach for students who are habitually absent from school by creating an absence intervention team for each student, eliminating suspensions and expulsions for students with unexcused absences, and delaying court interaction. If passed, the law would go into effect for the 2017-18 school year.

The House also concurred with amendments to HB299 (Blessing III-Rezabek) Custodian-Autism Scholarship.

 

The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Brenner, reported out on May 3, 2016 HB481 (Thompson-Koehler), Student Enrollment.  The bill permits students who receive a “choice scholarship,” but do not take state assessments as required in the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, to still be eligible for the scholarship/voucher.

The bill was amended to require the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to take into account school report card grades for the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 school years when determining student eligibility for the Educational Choice Scholarship Program.

Currently, safe harbor laws protect schools and teachers from consequences attached to report card scores between 2015-17.

The committee continued to hear testimony about HB524 (Cupp, Smith), a place-holder bill to review the value-added progress dimension measure used on the state report card to determine school and district ratings, and used in the evaluations of some teachers.

 

The House Finance Committee, chaired by Representative Smith received on May 3, 2016 testimony on HB547 (Smith) OBM-Mid Biennium Review from Tim Keen, director of the Office of Budget and Management. The bill includes a number of fiscally related provisions that address appropriations, taxes, and makes corrections in law.

See http://www.obm.ohio.gov/Budget/mid-biennium/doc/2016/OBM_MBR_House_Finance_Testimony_2016-05-03.pdf

 

The House Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education, chaired by Representative Duffey, met on May 5, 2016 to receive testimony on HB474 Higher Education MBR (Brown).  The bill amends laws pertaining to higher education to increase accessibility and reduce costs. According to the chair, the bill will be amended this week to include workforce development and some K-12 provisions.

See https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/download?key=4505&format=pdf

 

The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, continued to hear testimony on SB298 (Schiavoni) about charter school attendance.

Testifying on May 3, 2016 were Darold Johnson of the Ohio Federation of Teachers; Thomas Ash of the Buckeye Association of School Administrators, Barbara Shaner of the Ohio Association of School Business Officials (OASBO), and Damon Asbury of the Ohio School Boards Association (OSBA); Tony Dunn, the superintendent of Belpre City Schools; Becky Higgins of the Ohio Education Association; Bill Mullane of the Southside Academy, a Youngstown charter school; Brianne Kramer, a former high school adviser at the Ohio Virtual Academy; and Elizabeth Olden Stillgess, a mother who had enrolled her two children at ECOT, an online charter school.

The testimony supported provisions that would require e-charter schools to better monitor student engagement with lessons, and track student attendance.

The testimony is available at http://ohiosenate.gov/committee/finance#.

 

Bills Introduced:  

-HB549 (Patterson) STEM Degree Loan Repayment:  Creates the STEM Degree Loan Repayment Program and makes an appropriation.

-HB550 (Arndt) School Facilities-Technology Purchasing:  Requires the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

-HB542 (McColley) Polling Place-Extended Hours:  Specifies the conditions under which a court may order that a polling place be kept open for extended hours on the day of an election, and requires a person who votes pursuant to such an order to cast a provisional ballot.

-HB543 (Ramos) In-Person Absent Voting:  Specifies the conditions under which a board of county commissioners may establish one or more branch offices of the board of elections for in-person absent voting.

-HB544 (Koehler, Landis) High School Civics Assessment:  Permits high school students to take a civics assessment instead of the American government end of-course examination.

-HB547 (Smith) Ohio Budget and Management – MBR:  Provides authorization and sets the conditions for the operation of state programs and makes an appropriation.

-SB326 (Gardner) School District Technology Improvement:  Requires the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

-SB321 (Faber) Public Records:  Creates a procedure within the Court of Claims to hear complaints alleging a denial of access to public records, and modifies the circumstances under which a person who files a mandamus action seeking the release of public records may be awarded court costs and attorney’s fees.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Investing in Education Accepting Applications:  The U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) is accepting applications for a final round of the Investing in Innovation (i3) grants.  This competitive grant program was designed to “…expand the implementation of, and investment in, innovative practices that are demonstrated to have an impact on improving student achievement or student growth, closing achievement gaps, decreasing dropout rates, increasing high school graduation rates, or increasing college enrollment and completion rates.” The grant program is open to local educational agencies (LEAs), nonprofits in partnerships with LEAs, and school consortia.  The deadline to apply is May 24, 2016.

Investing in Education was replaced by a new Education Innovation Research (EIR) program in the Every Student Succeeds Act.

See http://innovation.ed.gov/what-we-do/innovation/investing-in-innovation-i3/

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

The State Board of Education, Tom Gunlock president, will extend their monthly meeting to three days this week, May 9-11, 2016, to provide time for members to interview candidates for the position of Superintendent of Public Instruction. The meetings will be held at the Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front Street in Columbus.

On Monday, May 9, 2016 former Ohio Governor Nancy Hollister will take the oath of office to become the newest member of the State Board of Education.  Governor Kasich appointed former Governor Hollister to the State Board of Education on May 3, 3016 to represent the 8th District, which is an elected office.  She replaces Robert McDonald, Jr. who resigned only a month or so after being appointed.  He replaced former Representative Bob Hagen, who resigned in June 2015.

Governor Hollister will need to be elected to the seat in November 2016 to complete the term, which ends December 31, 2018. Governor Hollister has served in several state and local offices, including mayor of Marietta, the director of the Governor’s Office of Appalachia, and lieutenant governor.

The State Board has scheduled interviews on May 9 and 10 with the candidates who are seeking the position of Superintendent of Public Instruction.  Thomas Jandris, a senior administrator at Concordia University Chicago, was to be interviewed, but dropped out of the running on May 6, 2016.  The following candidates remain:

– David Estrop, CEO of Estrop Consulting

– Paolo DeMaria, a principal of consulting firm Education First and former state budget director, associate superintendent and executive vice chancellor.

– Shonda Hardman, former chief of schools for Houston Independent School District in Texas

– Thomas Lasley, executive director of Learn to Earn Dayton

– Michael Sentance, an education consultant and former adviser to Massachusetts Govs. William Weld and Paul Cellucci

– Robert Sommers, the first director of Gov. John Kasich’s Office of 21st Century Education

– Tina Thomas-Manning, Reynoldsburg City Schools superintendent and a former top deputy to Ross

On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 the State Board meeting will begin at 8:00 AM with a meeting of the Standards and Graduation Requirements Committee, followed by the Capacity and Achievement committees, followed by the Accountability and Urban & Rural Renewal committees.

The State Board will then convene its business meeting, which includes public participation on agenda and non-agenda items, and voting on the Report and Recommendations of the Interim Superintendent of Public Instruction.  (See details below.)

The State Board has set aside some time during the business meeting to discuss and consider the candidates for superintendent, and could make a decision at that time.

The State Board will then consider Old Business and New Business.  A meeting of the Executive Committee is also scheduled before adjournment.

 

Report and Recommendations of the Interim Superintendent of Public Instruction:

#5 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Rescind and Adopt Rules 3301-103-02 and -05 of the Administrative Code and to Amend Rules 3301-103-01,-02,-04, and -06 through -07 of the Administrative code Regarding the Autism Scholarship Program.

#6 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Consider the Proposed Transfer of School District Territory from the Benjamin Logan Local School District, Logan County, to the Triad Local School District, Champaign County, Pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#7 Approve a Resolution to File As No Change rule 3301-16-01 of the Administrative Code Entitled GPA Calculation Chart for Alternative Pathway to Graduation.

#8 Approve a Resolution to File As No Change Rule 3301-33-01 of the Administrative Code Entitled Rule for Phonics.

#9 Approve a Resolution to File As No Change Rule 3301-49-01 of the Administrative Code Entitled Rule Relating to Guarantee of Competency of Certain High School Graduates.

#15  Approve a Resolution to Confirm the Northridge Local School District Board of Education’s Determination of Impractical to Transport Certain Students Attending Granville Christian Academy, Licking County, Ohio.

#16 Approve a Resolution to Confirm the Northridge Local School District Board of Education’s Determination of Impractical to Transport Certain Students Attending St. Francis De Sales, Licking County, Ohio.

 

OHIO NEWS

Schools Selected for Recognition:  The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) recognized on May 4, 2016 twenty-two Schools of Promise, fourteen High Performing Schools of Honor, and four High Progress Schools of Honor from around the state. Ten of the 29 schools received more than one award.

To qualify as a School of Promise, a school must meet these criteria:

-Serve at least 40 percent economically disadvantaged students.

-Achieve eighty percent or more proficiency in grades that took the 2014-2015 PARCC and Ohio Graduation Tests in reading and math for all subgroups of students, which includes economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient, students with disabilities and all racial/ethnic groups.

-Score an Ohio School Report Card grade of A or B on its Annual Measurable Objective, to narrow performance gaps between student groups.

-Receive an A or B on student learning progress through the school year and a grade of A or B on high school graduation rate, if it is a high school.

The High Performing Schools of Honor initiative builds on the Schools of Promise program, recognizing schools that exceed Schools of Promise criteria.

To be a High Performing School of Honor, a school must meet these criteria:

-Designated as Title I or eligible school and serve 40 percent or more economically disadvantaged students.

-Achieve ninety percent or more proficiency in grades that took the 2014-2015 PARCC and Ohio Graduation Tests in reading and math for all subgroups of students, which includes economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient, students with disabilities and all racial/ethnic groups over the last five years.

-Achieve eighty percent proficiency in all subgroups, which includes economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient, students with disabilities and all racial/ethnic groups.

-Score an Ohio School Report Card grade of A, B or C on its Annual Measurable Objective, to narrow performance gaps between student groups.

-Receive an A or B on student learning progress through the school year and a combined five-year graduation rate of 93 percent or higher, if it is a high school.

High Progress Schools of Honor are schools that have made the greatest five-year gains, although they may still have work to do to achieve at the level of High Performing Schools of Honor.

To be a High Progress School of Honor, a school must meet the following criteria:

-Designated as Title I or eligible school, and serve 40 percent or more economically disadvantaged students.

-Achieve gains in its combined reading and math proficiency over the past five years that are in the top 10 percent of all statewide gains in proficiency.

-Achieve gains in its legacy graduation rate over the past five years that are in the top 10 percent of all statewide gains in graduation.

-Score an Ohio School Report Card grade of A, B or C on its Annual Measurable Objective, to narrow performance gaps between student groups.

-Received an A or B on student learning progress for the three most recent school years.

The following is a list of the schools recognized this year:

Schools of Promise, High Performing Schools, and High Progress Schools

-Columbus Preparatory Academy

Schools of Promise and High Performing Schools

-Cleveland Early College High, Cleveland Municipal

-Cleveland School of Architecture & Design, -Cleveland Municipal

-Cleveland School of Science & Medicine, Cleveland Municipal

-Arts & College Preparatory Academy

-Toledo Early College High School, Toledo City

-West Boulevard Elementary School, Boardman Local

-Youngstown Early College, Youngstown City Schools

-Akron Early College High School, Akron City

-Maplewood Elementary School, Maplewood Local

Schools of Promise

-Mapleton High School, Mapletown Local

-Reid Elementary School, Clark-Shawnee Local

-Blanchester High School, Blanchester Local

-West Point Elementary School, Beaver Local

-MC^2 STEM High School, Cleveland Municipal

-Westfall High School, Westfall Local

-National Trail High School, National Tail Local

-Mansfield Spanish Immersion School, Mansfield City

-Plymouth High School, Plymouth-Shiloh Local

-Avondale Elementary School, Plain Local

-Akron STEM High School, Akron City

-Rittman High School, Rittman Exempted Village

High Performing Schools

-Hocking Hills Elementary School, Logan-Hocking Local

-Pugliese Elementary West, Steubenville City

-Robinwood Lane Elementary School, Boardman Local

-Girard Sr High School, Girard City School District

High Progress Schools

-Canterbury Elementary School, Cleveland -Heights0University Heights

-Rimer Community Learning Center, Akron City

-Ritzman Community Learning Center, Akron City

 

Ohio Revenues Down in April: Tim Keen, director of the Office of Budget and Management, reported to the House Finance Committee on May 5, 2016 that the fiscal condition of the state is strong, and the budget is structurally balanced, with about $2 billion in the Budget Stabilization Fund — Rainy Day Fund.  The estimated GRF ending balance for FY16 is $469.7 million, which is $296 million above the 0.5 percent statutory target.

But he also reported that state revenue in April 2016 was below estimates by $126.4 million or 6.5 percent.  The drop was a result of lower than expected revenue collected from the income tax, combined sales tax, Commercial Activity Tax, and Kilowatt Hour Tax.  The state is now below estimates by almost $117.2 million, collecting a total of $17.8 billion through April 2016.

The drop in revenue is not a problem, because there has also been a drop in state spending as well, but going into FY17, the OBM will make more conservative revenue projections.

See http://www.obm.ohio.gov/Budget/mid-biennium/doc/2016/OBM_MBR_House_Finance_Testimony_2016-05-03.pdf

 

Court Clarifies the Meaning of Meetings:  The Ohio Supreme Court issued on May 3, 2016 a decision in a lawsuit about alleged violations of the Open Meetings Act.

The lawsuit, White v. King et al, was filed by Adam White in March 2013 against four members of the Olentangy Local School board.  These four members had decided to take an action, publish a response to a newspaper editorial, through exchanging emails, rather than during a public meeting, and had excluded one of the board members, Adam White, in that decision.

The court was asked to decide if exchanging emails constituted a public meeting.

According to the decision, written by Justice Terrence O’Donnell, the Ohio Revised code does not require that a ‘meeting’ occur face to face.  He writes, “To the contrary, it provides that any prearranged discussion can qualify as a meeting. Accordingly, R.C. 121.22 prohibits any private prearranged discussion of public business by a majority of the members of a public body regardless of whether the discussion occurs face to face, telephonically, by video conference, or electronically by email, text, tweet or other form of communication.”

The case was on appeal from the Delaware County Court of Common Pleas 5th Appellate District.  The decision now allows Mr. White to pursue the lawsuit against the four board members.

See http://www.courtnewsohio.gov/cases/2016/SCO/0503/141796.asp#.Vy0LwGNzsw1

 

Ohio Schools Lose Lawsuit: The Ohio Supreme Court issued a decision in the lawsuit Toledo City School District board of Education v. State Board of Education on May 4, 2016.  The 5 to 2 decision affirmed the Ohio General Assembly’s authority to adjust state school funding for school districts for past errors.

The Toledo, Cleveland, and Dayton school districts filed in 2011 a lawsuit challenging the practice of the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to deduct funds from school district accounts to adjust for past enrollment discrepancies. The school districts lost millions of dollars in recalculations of their 2005 state aid amounts.

The General Assembly approved a law in 2009 which permitted the ODE to make adjustments in school district state aid funding retroactively, and also gave the ODE immunity from legal action retroactively.

The school districts argued that the Ohio Constitution (Article II, Section 28 Retroactively Clause) prohibited the ODE from applying a law retroactively.

The justices decided that the Constitutional clause applies only to individuals and private corporations, not to political subdivisions, such as school districts, that carry out the state’s business.  The decision reversed an appeals court decision.  The lawsuit is not over, however, and now returns to a Franklin County Court for further proceedings.

See http://www.courtnewsohio.gov/cases/2016/SCO/0504/141769.asp#.Vy0NMmNzsw0

 

FYI ARTS

Schools Can Use Title I Funds for the Arts: The California Alliance for Arts Education has worked for the past four years on an initiative to inform educators, school leaders, and arts organizations about how Title I funds can be used to support arts education programs.

Dr. Laura Smyth, a lead consultant with the California Alliance for Arts Education, recently posted on the Americans for the Arts ArtsBlog some timely information for arts education advocates to know about Title I funding, as states, including Ohio, develop their plans to implement the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Title I – Improving Basic Programs Operated by State and Local Education Agencies, part of the Every Student Succeeds Act, is a major source of federal funding for Ohio’s schools with high numbers or high percentages of children from low income families.  Title I funding is allocated through four statutory formulas that are based on census poverty estimates and the cost of education in each state.  In the 2015-16 school year Ohio schools received $558.4 million for Title I Part A and $18 million for School Improvement.  A list of Ohio school districts and their Title I allocations is available at http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Topics/School-Improvement/Federal-Programs/FY15-Allocations-for-website.pdf.aspx

Local education agencies (LEAs) must target Title I funds to schools with the highest percentages of children from low-income families, and focus Title I services on children who are failing, or at risk of failing.

Schools in which children from low-income families make up at least 40 percent of enrollment are eligible to use Title I funds for schoolwide programs that serve all students in the school.  Under schoolwide programs LEAs can also consolidate Title I funds with other federal, state, and local funds. States can approve waivers for LEAs with less than a 40 percent poverty rate to operate a schoolwide program. In addition, schools can use Title 1 funds for preschool programs or dual/concurrent enrollment programs.

Under ESSA, State Education Agencies (SEAs) must develop new program plans, including Title I, in order to receive FY2017 funds.  The plans must be developed in consultation with stakeholders, including the governor, members of the state legislature, the state board of education, local education agencies, teachers, principals, and parents, among others.  A state may develop an individual program plan or a consolidated plan, but all plans must be submitted to the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE).

Also under ESSA, states must assure that an LEA’s Title I plan describes “…how the local educational agency will monitor students’ progress in meeting the challenging State academic standards by (A) developing and implementing a well-rounded program of instruction to meet the academic needs of all students.”

A well-rounded education is defined in ESSA Title VIII 8001 (52) as “…activities and programming in subjects such as English, reading or language arts, writing, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, geography, computer science, music, career and technical education, health, physical education, and any other subject, as determined by the State or local educational agency, with the purpose of providing all students access to an enriched curriculum and educational experience.”

According to the ArtsBlog by Laura Smyth, one of the major reasons school districts don’t use Title I funds for arts education programs is “…a fear of reprisal—the potential revocation of funding.”  To overcome this barrier in California, the California Alliance for Arts Education met with school and community leaders around the state to create an online resource, title1arts.org, to assist arts educators navigate Title I requirements.  For example, the website draws from the Arts Education Partnership’s ArtsEdSearch to access over 200 vetted research studies that align with the four Title I goals — Student Achievement, Student Engagement, School Climate and Culture, and Parent Involvement.  Schools/districts can use the website’s search feature to select an arts-based, research-based strategy to meet the needs of students to comply with Title I requirements.

In 2014 the San Diego Unified School District committed $3 million in Title I funds to support arts integration in 22 schools, and is now working with the California Alliance for Arts Education to share their experiences, and encourage other schools around the state to add the arts to their Title I plan.

In addition, the California Alliance formed a partnership with Arizona, and has developed an Arizona-based version of the title1arts.org website.

See “Title I and the Arts — Yes, you can!”, by Laura Smyth, Americans for the Arts ArtsBlog, April 5, 2016 at http://blog.americansforthearts.org/2016/04/05/title-i-and-the-arts-%E2%80%94-yes-you-can#sthash.oeKfCmTq.dpuf

See the California Alliance for Arts Education’s Title I website at http://www.title1arts.org/#!home/c1e0u

See http://www2.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/index.html for information about Title 1.

See “In ESSA, Arts Are Part of ‘Well-Rounded Education” by Jackie Zubrzycki, Education Week, December 15, 2015 at

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2015/12/esea_rewrite_retains_support_f.html


This update is written weekly by Joan Platz, Research and Knowledge Director for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

The purpose of the update is to keep arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association(www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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