Arts On Line Education Update 03.31.2014

Ohio News

130th Ohio General Assembly: The Ohio House and Senate will hold hearings and sessions this week. The Senate is scheduled to vote on HB497 (Amstutz) Capital Appropriations for the biennium ending June 30, 2016, and the House will continue hearings on the Mid Biennial Review bills (MBR).

Senate President Keith Faber announced last week that two “if needed” weeks will be added to the Senate’s session schedule. The Senate was to recess on May 21, 2014, but the additional weeks mean that the Senate could be meeting in June to complete work on the MBRs, which are making their way through House committees.

May Primary Election: The May 6th Primary Election is just weeks away. Voters will be selecting candidates to run in November 2014 for statewide executive offices, including Governor/Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Auditor, Secretary of State, Treasurer; members of the Ohio General Assembly; representatives to the U.S. Congress; members of the State Board of Education; county offices; judicial offices; and members of political parties. Voters will also vote on 614 local issues, including 150 school issues, and vote on State Issue 1, a proposed constitutional amendment to fund public infrastructure capital improvements by permitting the issuance of general obligation bonds.

Boards of elections will be mailing absentee ballots for those who requested them this week, and in-person absentee voting begins on Tuesday, April 1, 2014. April 7, 2014 is the deadline to register to vote in the primary election.

See The Secretary of State’s web site.

Students Field Testing New Assessments: The Ohio Department of Education announced last week that students in several Ohio schools began field-testing assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Ohio is among several states participating in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), a consortium that is working with Pearson Inc. to develop assessments in English language arts and math aligned to the new standards. Ohio is also working with American Institutes for Research (AIR) to field-test assessments for science and social studies.

The computer-based assessments include performance-based sections, in which students must demonstrate how they would solve a problem, and multiple choice sections, which will be administered later this school year. Paper and pencil assessments are also available in some schools.

More information is available.

Legislative Update

Governor Signs Bills: Governor Kasich signed into law on March 26, 2014 HB107 (Baker) Career Exploration Internships-Tax Credits. The law authorizes a tax credit for businesses that employ high school students in career exploration internships.

He also signed into law HB416 (Burkley/Hill) Calamity Days. This law permits payment in fiscal year 2015 to school districts and STEM schools that exceed, by up to four days, the number of permitted “calamity” days in fiscal year 2014.

House Approves the Capital Bill: The Ohio House approved last week HB497 (Amstutz) Capital Appropriations for the biennium ending June 30, 2016. The $2.4 billion bill sailed through the House with only minor adjustments to some of the agencies administering the funds. The Senate is expected to pass the bill quickly this week, so that projects currently underway are not delayed.

House Education Committee Reports Bills: The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, met on March 29, 2014 and reported the following bills:

  • HB241 (Hagen) School Employees-Sexual Conduct, which would prohibit an employee of a public or nonpublic school or institution of higher education from engaging in sexual conduct with a minor who is enrolled in or attends that public or nonpublic school.
  • SB69 (Beagle) Course and Program Sharing Network, which would establish the Course and Program Sharing Network.
  • HB393 (Baker/Landis) Career Decision Guide Publication, which would require public high schools to publish annually a career decision guide in its newsletter or on its web site.

Substitute Bill Changes SB299: The House Education Committee also accepted a substitute bill for SB229 (Gardner) Teacher Performance Evaluations. SB299 was unanimously approved by the Ohio Senate on December 4, 2013, but has languished in the House Education Committee since then. As passed by the Senate the bill would have reduced the number of complete evaluations for accomplished teachers under Ohio’s Teacher Evaluation System (OTES), and decreased the student growth measure component used in the teacher evaluation metric from 50 to 35 percent, which is in line with other state teacher evaluation systems.

The substitute bill completely changes the focus of SB229 in the following ways:

  • Reverts to current law which requires student academic growth to account for 50 percent of a teacher’s evaluation, but permits boards of education to use an alternate teacher evaluation framework, which would include 40 percent for student academic growth measure; 40 percent for teacher performance measure; and 20 percent for student surveys. Allows boards of education to use the new framework that includes the student survey results, or a Teacher Evaluation Rating Table. The table includes five ranges for scoring the student academic growth measure and four scores ranging from one to four for the teacher performance levels, which are based on formal observations. Teachers could be rated accomplished, skilled, effective, developing, or ineffective, according to the table.
  • Permits student surveys to be part of teacher evaluations and requires the State Board to approve two surveys by March 31, 2015. The surveys must be empirically tested and validated.
  • Adds another performance level rating of “effective” between “skilled” and “developing,” “thus creating five educator performance levels.”
  • Requires at least one formal unannounced observation of a teacher by an evaluator.
  • Reverts to current law allowing a district or school to evaluate a teacher rated “accomplished” once every two years, but adds this condition: reduces the number of annual evaluations for a teacher who is rated “accomplished” or “skilled” if the teacher’s student academic growth measure is rated average or higher. The bill also requires that teachers who are not formally evaluated every year be observed and participate in a conference regarding the observation.
  • Allows a district or school to choose not to evaluate a teacher, if the teacher has been on leave from the school district for 70 percent or more of the school year, or has submitted a notice to retire.
  • Requires teachers rated effective, developing, or ineffective to prepare and implement an improvement plan.
  • Beginning July 1, 2015 prohibits a school district from assigning students to a teacher who has been rated ineffective for two consecutive school years. Also prohibits the assignment of a student teacher to a teacher who was rated developing or ineffective for the previous school year.
  • Requires that teachers who have at least 10 years experience, but receive a designation of either “least effective” or “below average growth” on the student academic growth portion of an educator evaluation, receive the “developing” rating only once.
  • Requires the ODE not later than July 1, 2015 to develop a standardized framework for assessing student academic growth for grade levels and subjects for which the value-added progress dimension does not apply.
  • Requires that boards of education administer an assessment to students in each of grades K-12 to determine a teacher’s student academic growth in English language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science beginning on July 1, 2016. The ODE must select the assessments, which may include diagnostic assessments and achievement assessments already required under law.
  • Requires teacher “evaluators” to meet certain criteria, and requires school administrators to complete an evaluator training program as part of their administrator certification/licensing requirements.
  • Requires the State Board to develop a framework to evaluate principals and assistant principals.
  • Requires all diagnostic assessments adopted by the State Board of Education to be based either on the value-added progress dimension or assessments of student growth measures developed by a vendor.
  • Specifies that the reading diagnostic assessments used to determine a student’s reading level for the third-grade reading guarantee be based either on the value-added progress dimension or assessments of student growth measures developed by a vendor, and be approved by the ODE.
  • Exempts all provisions regarding educator evaluations from collective bargaining.
  • States that the “value-added progress dimension rating for the 2014-2015 school year will not be used when making decisions regarding teacher dismissal, retention, tenure or compensation.”

This Week at the Statehouse

March 31, 2013

House Higher Education Subcommittee: The House Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Rosenberger, will meet on March 31, 2014 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 311. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB484 (Rosenberger) MBR Higher Education Reforms.

Senate Finance Committee: The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, will meet on March 31, 2014 at 1:30 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB497 (Amstutz) Capital Appropriations for the biennium ending June 30, 2016.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

House Higher Education Subcommittee: The House Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Rosenberger, will meet on April 1, 2014 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 311. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB484 (Rosenberger) MBR Higher Education Reforms.

Senate Finance Committee: The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, will meet on April 1, 2014 at 9:30 AM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB497 (Amstutz) Capital Appropriations for the biennium ending June 30, 2016.

House Finance and Appropriations: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet on April 1, 2014 at 1:30 PM in hearing room 313. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB483 (Amstutz) MBR – Changes in State Programs.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

House Education Committee: The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, will meet on April 2, 2014 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 017. The committee will receive testimony on HB447 (Lynch) Consolidated School District Loans and HB487 (Brenner) MBR-K-12 Education Programs.

House Finance and Appropriations: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet on April 2, 2014 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 313. The committee will receive testimony regarding HB483 (Amstutz) MBR-Changes in State Programs.

Senate Education Committee: The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on April 2, 2014 at 3:30 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will receive a presentation from the Ohio College Access Network, and receive testimony on SB241 (Sawyer) Straight A Program Governing Board, and HB171 (McClain/Patmon) Released Time Courses-Religious Instruction.

Thursday, April 3, 2014

House Education Committee: The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, will meet on April 3, 2014 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 313. The committee will receive testimony on HB460 (Brenner/Driehaus) School Restructuring and HB487 (Brenner) MBR-K-12 Education Programs.

National News

Leveraging Federal Funds for Technology: In a letter to colleagues dated February 4, 2014, Richard Culatta, the U.S. Department of Education’s director of the Office of Educational Technology, identified several ways for educators to leverage federal funds to support digital teaching and learning. For example, Dr. Culatta recommended that states, districts, and partnerships understand and better use their federal grant programs to support innovative technology-based strategies to personalize learning. These include ESEA Title I, II, III funds and IDEA funds. These funds can be used to improve personalized professional development for educators, increase access to high-quality content and resources for students, facilitate educator collaboration and communication, and provide devices for students to access digital learning resources.

More information is available.

Indiana Opts Out of the Common Core, or Does It?? The Indianapolis Star reported on March 24, 2014 that Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed into law last week SB91, a bill that removes references to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Indiana law, and requires the Indiana state board of education to adopt new standards aligned with national and international college and career readiness standards.

Indiana was one of 45 states and the District of Columbia to adopt the Common Core State Standards in 2010. The framework for the CCSS standards was developed by David Coleman, formerly of Achieve and now president of the College Board, with the assistance of Student Achievement Partners and through the leadership of the National Governor’s Association, the Council of Chief State School Officers, and Achieve. More information is available.

Anticipating this legislative action the Indiana Department of Education developed a process to involve educators, parents, and citizens in a review of the Common Core State Standards, and developed new academic content standards in English language arts and math. The Indiana State Board is scheduled to vote on the proposed Indiana academic standards in April 2014. The standards would go into effect on July 1, 2014.

According to the article, some experts believe that the new standards do not differ very much from the original Common Core State Standards, but officials in the Indiana department of education say that drafts of the proposed standards are being changed daily, and the final version of the standards will represent the knowledge and skills that the people of Indiana want students in grades K-12 to know and learn.

Here in Ohio State Representative Andy Thompson (R-Marietta) introduced HB237, which would prohibit the State Board of Education from adopting the Common Core State Standards and participating in the assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), the Smarter Balanced Assessments, or any other assessments related to the Common Core State Standards. The bill also outlines a process that the State Board would use to develop Ohio-based academic content standards. The bill had two hearings in the House Education Committee last fall, but no recent action has been taken on the bill.

See “Gov. Mike Pence ends Common Core, but not its influence” by Eric Weddle, Indy Star.

More Students Reported with Autism: The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention released on March 28, 2014 a report with information about the prevalence of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 8 year old children for 2010. The report was prepared by the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and included ASD data collected from eleven ADDM sites.

According to an abstract of the report “…the overall prevalence of ASD among the ADDM sites was 14.7 per 1,000 (one in 68) children aged 8 years. Overall ASD prevalence estimates varied among sites from 5.7 to 21.9 per 1,000 children aged 8 years. ASD prevalence estimates also varied by sex and racial/ethnic group. Approximately one in 42 boys and one in 189 girls living in the ADDM Network communities were identified as having ASD. Non-Hispanic white children were approximately 30% more likely to be identified with ASD than non-Hispanic black children and were almost 50% more likely to be identified with ASD than Hispanic children.”

The report also notes that the median age of earliest known ASD diagnosis was 53 months and did not differ significantly by sex or race/ethnicity.

The authors of the report warn that the prevalence estimates presented in the report cannot be generalized to all children aged 8, because the ADDM Network sites do not provide a representative sample of the entire United States.

Also, the authors note the “significant variations in ASD prevalence by geographic area, sex, race/ethnicity, and level of intellectual ability”, and offer that these variation might be “…attributable to diagnostic practices, under recognition of ASD symptoms in some racial/ethnic groups, socioeconomic disparities in access to services, and regional differences in clinical or school-based practices”.

The authors recommend that standardized measures to document ASD severity and functional limitations associated with ASD diagnosis be developed and used; those who diagnose ASD improve recognition and documentation of symptoms, particularly among both boys and girls, children without intellectual disability, and children in all racial/ethnic groups; and that the children be assessed for ASD at an earlier age. The earliest age for a diagnosis is two years.

See “Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 8 Years — Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 11 Sites, United States, 2010 Surveillance Summaries” by Jon Baio, corresponding author, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, March 28, 2014.

AEP Releases Summary of State Arts Policies: The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) recently released a policy brief entitled “A Snapshot of State Policies for Arts Education”. The brief summarizes the “…results of a 2014 analysis of current state policies for arts education. The brief provides the background for the study and reports the findings in several policy areas, including requirements for standards, instruction, assessment, accountability, and teacher certification.”

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) is a national coalition of more than 100 education, arts, business, cultural, government, and philanthropic organizations established in 1995 by the National Endowment for the Arts, the U.S. Department of Education, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA). The AEP is a noted source for objective and nonpartisan information about current and emerging arts education research, policies, issues, and activities.

According to the policy brief, there is “…a strong public policy consensus across states that the arts are an important curricular area that contribute to a quality K-12 education, but also that there’s considerable variation in how states address specific arts education policy areas.”

The brief identifies a “policy paradox” in which millions of students are denied instruction in the arts as part of their regular education (based on federal surveys), even though there is overall support for arts education programs in state laws and in state administrative codes.

The authors conclude, “The promise of an equitable and high quality education that includes the arts for every student depends upon the combination of strong policies at the state level, adequate resources and support to implement them at the local level, and mechanisms in place to hold all parties accountable for compliance.”

The following is a summary of some of the findings of the brief organized into several policy areas, and comments offered by this author about the status of arts education in Ohio’s traditional public schools.

The Arts as a Core Academic Subject: According to the brief 27 states define the arts as a core academic subject, but a majority of the 27 states do not define the term “arts”. Only Georgia lists the four arts disciplines of dance, drama/theatre, music, and visual art in its statutes. Currently federal law defines the arts as a core academic subject in The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (No Child Left Behind of 2001), but the law does not define the term “arts”.

Comment: Ohio law requires boards of education to provide for the study of the “fine arts including music”, and requires STEM schools to include the arts in their curriculum. Charter schools are not required to provide instruction in the arts.

“The arts” are not defined in Ohio law, and there is no specific requirement that the arts be taught at any grade level for any length of time. Required minutes of instruction in the arts at the elementary and middle school levels were in the 1983 Operating Standards for Ohio’s Schools, but were removed in the 2001 revision of the standards. Ohio law does include the arts in the list of “elective courses” that students can take to earn credits for graduation.

The July 2011 revision of operating standards, which are part of the Ohio Administrative Code, requires that boards of education adopt courses of study for each subject taught, and include in the courses of study learning objectives; sequential learning; sufficient opportunity for students to learn the course of study objectives; and assessment of student learning. Arts education advocates have used this language to promote sequential learning in the arts in grades K-12.

State Standards for Arts Education: According to the brief all but one state, Iowa, have adopted elementary and secondary standards for arts education. Most states have developed separate standards for each of the arts disciplines, but only three states, Minnesota, Nebraska, and South Carolina, have developed standards for media arts.

Most states (45) have also included the arts in their early learning standards for children birth to school age.

Comment: The Ohio State Board of Education adopted revised academic standards for the fine arts in 2012, but the standards do not include media arts as a separate discipline. Ohio’s early learning standards do not include the arts. Currently the State Board of Education is reviewing a new model curriculum for the arts aligned to the 2012 standards, and is scheduled to adopt the curriculum in June 2014.

Instructional Requirements for the Arts: According to the brief, forty-five states have instructional requirements for the arts at the elementary and middle school levels, and 42 states have them at the high school level. The instructional requirements are often part of a school’s state accreditation process.

Instructional requirements vary greatly among the states. Some states, for example Missouri, require that “Each elementary student will receive regular instruction in art, music, and physical education for a minimum of 50 minutes in each area each week.”

Arkansas law provides the strongest support for arts instruction at the elementary level. It states, “… every public elementary school in the state shall provide [weekly] instruction for no less than forty (40) minutes in visual art and no less than forty [40] minutes in music based on the state visual art and music frameworks.” Other states, including Ohio, are less specific.

Comment: As stated before, required minutes of instruction in the arts were removed from Operating Standards in 2001. Ohio’s public schools are chartered by the State Department of Education, but schools are no longer audited or inspected regularly to ensure that they comply with all laws and rules. However, Ohio Administrative Code Rule 3301-35-11 (C) states that, “Failure to comply with applicable rules in this chapter and rule 3301-56-01 of the Administrative Code shall be cause for initiating efforts to revoke the school district’s charter in accordance with section 3301.16 of the Revised Code and Chapter 119. of the Revised Code. The department of education may investigate allegations of noncompliance with the rules in this chapter, as it deems necessary.”

High School Graduation Requirements Pertaining to the Arts: The brief finds that twenty-six states mandate that high school students earn at least one credit in the arts as a requirement for graduation. Utah requires high school students to take “1.5 units of credit from any of the following areas: visual arts, music, dance [and] theater.” Another 18 states require students to earn “elective” credits, and include the arts among the elective subjects.

The brief also notes that some statewide institutions of higher education require arts credits for admission, including higher education systems in California, Arizona, Minnesota, South Carolina, and Connecticut.

Comment: With some exceptions, students in traditional public schools in Ohio are required to successfully complete two semesters or the equivalent in the arts in any grades 7-12 starting with the class of 2014. Students in charter schools, dropout prevention and recovery programs, and students in career technology programs are exempted from this requirement.

The arts are listed among a variety of electives that students can take to meet graduation requirements, and many Ohio colleges and universities require the arts as part of their admission standards.

Assessment and Accountability in the Arts: According to the brief 17 states have policies in statute or code that pertain to assessment of student learning in the arts. Most states have general requirements that local boards of education adopt policies to assess student progress in all subjects taught. Only Oklahoma and New Jersey specify in their arts assessment policies either reporting requirements or details of assessment. Oklahoma requires an assessment of student achievement in the arts in grades 3-8, and requires each school district to prepare an annual report outlining the fine arts assessment strategies used; when assessments were administered; and the results of the assessments.

New Jersey requires that boards of education report the “progress of all students” in developing the knowledge and skills in the visual and performing arts. New Jersey’s 2014 School Performance Reports included for the first time the percent of New Jersey students who were enrolled in courses in the arts.

The brief also notes that Connecticut, Maine, North Carolina, and Kentucky provide resources for the assessment of student learning in the arts.

Comment: Ohio law requires the assessment of student achievement in all courses taught, but Ohio does not have a statewide assessment in the arts. The Ohio Department of Education is required to report on the 2014 local report card the availability of fine arts courses for students. The ODE is currently working on how this will look.

Teacher Certification or Licensing Requirements: According to the brief 42 states have arts-specific language pertaining to certification or licensing requirements for arts teachers. Most of the 42 states refer to requirements for music and visual art educators. Certification/licensing requirements for theater teachers are identified in 32 states, and in 26 states for dance teachers. Several states also certify English teachers to teach theater, and physical education teachers to teach dance.

In addition, 34 states require non-arts teachers to take courses in the arts in teacher preparation programs, especially teachers at the elementary level. North Carolina includes references to arts integration in its teacher preparation requirements for general elementary level educators. Six states, Alaska, Arkansas, Hawaii, Mississippi, West Virginia, and Wyoming, do not mention the certification of educators in the arts in statute or code.

Comment: Ohio requires that courses in the arts be taught by teachers with the appropriate license, which includes a multi-age license in a specific arts discipline; a preK-3 license (which requires course work to teach the arts); a 4-9 license with an endorsement in an arts discipline; and an early childhood generalist license (for grades 4 & 5), which is a license that is added to the preK-3 license.

Overall the brief identifies Minnesota, New Hampshire, and New Jersey as states that define the arts as a core subject and have aligned arts education policies with other core curricular areas. According to the brief, “These three states include in statute or administrative code requirements for (1) elementary and secondary content standards; (2) instruction at elementary, middle, and high school levels; (3) course credits for high school graduation; and (4) assessment of student learning in the arts.”

State policies regarding K-12 arts education are available through ArtScan, a searchable database that provides information in 14 policy areas, and is available on the Arts Education Partnership website. ArtScan allows users to explore data in multiple ways by providing a state level profile for all policy areas, a comparison of selected state and policy areas, and state-level reports. A new feature of ArtScan is the descriptive indicators for each state compiled annually by the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.

See “A Snapshot of State Policies for Arts Education”.

Bills Introduced

HB502 (Foley/Hagen) Minimum Wage Increase: Increases the state minimum wage to ten dollars and ten cents an hour beginning January 1, 2015.

HB503 (Budish) Business Plan Development-Higher Education Students: Requires the Chancellor of the Board of Regents to establish a competition for the development of successful business plans for students enrolled at state institutions of higher education and makes an appropriation.

HB507 (Butler) Ohio Local Government Expenditure Database: Establishes the Ohio Local Government Expenditure Database.

FYI ARTS

Ohio Senator Earns Arts Leadership Award: Americans for the Arts in conjunction with The United States Conference of Mayors presented the 2014 National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership to Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Representative James P. Moran (D-VA). The award, which recognizes distinguished public service on behalf of the arts, was presented on March 25, 2014 at the Congressional Arts Kick Off during National Arts Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill.

Senator Brown was recognized for his support of local arts organizations in Ohio; his interest in how the arts impact economic and workforce development; his support for arts education as part of a well-rounded education; and his interest in the role of the arts in revitalizing communities and individual lives.

Representative Moran was recognized for his steadfast support for the National Endowment for the Arts in the U.S. House; his support for cultural and performing arts in and around the District; and for his support for research about the healing properties of arts therapy for wounded veterans.

The National Award for Congressional Arts Leadership is part of a series of Public Leadership in the Arts Awards which have been given annually since 1997 by Americans for the Arts and The United States Conference of Mayors.

More information is available.

All-Ohio State Fair Director Named: Ohio State Fair officials announced last week the selection of Dr. Jon C. Peterson of Canton in Stark County as director of the All-Ohio State Fair Youth Choir.

Dr. Peterson earned a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in Choral Conducting, with a minor in historical musicology from the University of Arizona. He currently serves as Director of Choral Activities and Assistant Professor of Music at Malone University in Canton, Ohio, where he conducts the Malone University Chorale, Chamber Choir and Chapel Choir. At Malone he also teaches courses in music education, conducting, and music ministry. Prior to coming to Malone last fall, Dr. Peterson served on the choral faculty at Bluffton University in Bluffton, Ohio, and as Artistic Director of The Magpie Consort, a Columbus-based chamber choir.

As director of the All-Ohio State Fair Youth Choir Dr. Peterson will recruit, select, prepare, and lead more than 200 high school vocalists in the All-Ohio State Fair Youth Choir. Members of The All-Ohio State Fair Youth Choir will arrive at the Ohio Expo Center on July 17, 2014 and perform six to eight times each day during the 12-day Fair.

More information is available.

NY City Teams with Amp Up NYC: Guest blogger Alyssa Morones writes for Education Week’s Curriculum Matters Blog that New York City Schools are expanding music education programs through the Amp Up NYC partnership. Working with Amp Up NYC are the New York Department of Education, Berklee College of Music, and Little Kids Rock. The purpose of the program is to train music teachers to teach modern band, such as hip hop, hard rock, and punk. The program will provide the curriculum and lesson plans, and participating teachers will receive credits to purchase instruments (guitars, drums, keyboards, etc.) for free provided by Amp Up. Berklee will provide sheet music, history, and the recordings of modern songs, while Little Kids Rock will provide materials for younger students. The three year pilot program is expected to reach more than 600 schools and 60,000 students.

See “New Partnership Brings Rock and Roll to N.Y.C. Schools” by Alyssa Morones Education Week’s Curriculum Matters Blog, March 27, 2014,

OAAE and Tip Top partner for Community Partner Day on April 28, 2014: The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education has been selected to partner with Tip Top on Monday, April 28th for Community Partner Day. On this day, Tip Top will donate 10% of their food sales from 11am to 2am to OAAE. Tip Top is a part of Columbus Food League (CFL), a family of six local, independent restaurants.

Please share this event with your friends and family in Columbus and join us to support the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education with lunch, dinner, or drinks. We hope to see you there! Event details can be found on the OAAE Facebook page.

 

This update is written weekly by Joan Platz, Research and Knowledge Director for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.  The purpose of the update is to keep arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.  The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, OhioDance, and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

Advertisements

About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
This entry was posted in Arts On Line. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s