Arts On Line Education Update 06.03.2013

If not for Dr. MacGregor …

If not for Dr. Nancy MacGregor, president of the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education in 1981 and 1982, our efforts to work in close partnership with the Ohio Legislature and School Administrators may have taken many more years, and our efforts to impact policy and local decisions would not be as engrained in our daily work as it is today.

During Dr. MacGregor’s tenure as president, the State Board of Education and Board of Regents issued an “Articulation Report” and the OAAE worked dutifully to make sure the arts were included. While they were not successful, the process and the relationships that were built allowed us to lean into people’s personal and professional lives regarding the need for and value of the arts to a complete education.  OAAE made specific recommendations to the State Board of Education regarding the academic content standards and made some headway into that endeavor. Dr. MacGregor, then and now, is a persuasive lady who does not back down when pursuing what’s good for kids. She moves forward with such style and class, that people don’t know what hit them!

Under Dr. MacGregor’s leadership the Information Exchange, a statewide conference on arts education, debuted. Bringing teachers, administrators, parents, and policy makers together to celebrate arts education and to learn together. A promotional brochure was created and distributed statewide, and during this time a slide tape presentation titled “Make it Happen With the Arts” was also designed. Some of you reading this article might not even know what a ‘slide tape’ presentation is, but it was cutting edge at the time.

Today, Dr. MacGregor remains an active and vibrant arts education leader. She is a past-president of the Ohio Art Education Association (OAEA), an active member of the Ohio Art Education Association Distinguished Fellows, and serves on the board of the Ohio Art Education Foundation (OAEF). Dr. MacGregor was a founder of the National Art Education Foundation that OAEA used as a model, with her guidance, to establish the OAEF. Dr. MacGregor was the National Art Education President from 1983-1985 and was inducted into NAEA Distinguished Fellows in 1986.  At the national level she is a Life Trustee of the National Art Education Foundation.

Dr. MacGregor is a Professor Emeritus of Art Education at The Ohio State University. She was instrumental in bringing discipline-based art education into the classroom. Her accomplishments in leadership, scholarship, and the policy arena are vast. However, I believe her contributions are even greater at a personal level. Dr. MacGregor nurtured and developed young teachers, pushed average teachers to be great, and has always kept the children at the core of her being. Dr. MacGregor guided and advised graduate students, from around the world, who became accomplished in their own right, due to her mentoring, high expectations, and tough love. She continues to be a role model, an advocate, and a champion for arts education. And, if not for Dr. Nancy MacGregor I would not be the state and national leader I am today.

Susan W. Witten, Ph.D.

President

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education

Ohio News

Senate Announces School Funding Changes: Ohio Senate President Keith Faber held a news conference on May 30, 2013 to announce the Senate’s plan for funding K-12 education in Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget. The Ohio Senate plans to increase the state aid formula amount to $5,745 per pupil in FY14 and $5,800 in FY15. The plan would increase funding for schools by $717.4 million over FY13 levels, and increase the cap on state funding increases (referred to as the gain cap) to 6.25 percent in FY14, and 10.5 percent in FY15. According to a spreadsheet, also released, 242 districts would be capped by the end of the biennium, and 176 school districts would be on a guarantee. The Columbus Dispatch also reported that the Senate plan includes $54 million to support the Third Grade Reading Guarantee, and an additional $30 million to support early childhood education. More details about the Senate school funding plan will be available this week, when the Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, considers an omnibus amendment for Am. Sub. HB59.

Senate unveils school funding proposal, $142M more than House plan”, Columbus Dispatch, May 30, 2013,

Senate Web site is available.

House Approves Bill for Columbus City Schools: The House approved on May 29, 2013 by a vote of 78 to 15 HB167 (Heard/Grossman) Columbus Schools Oversight. The bill would do the following:

  • Authorize a specific school district (Columbus City Schools) to levy property taxes, the revenue from which may be shared with partnering community schools
  • Require the district to place a levy on the ballot at the next general or special election
  • Create the position of independent auditor, subject to voter approval. The independent auditor would be selected for a five-year term by a committee consisting of the mayor, council president, city auditor, school board president, and county probate court judge.
  • Authorize the mayor of Columbus to sponsor community schools
  • Declare an emergency.

The bill’s provisions are in response to State Auditor David Yost’s findings and recommendations regarding attendance data irregularities at the Columbus City Schools. In addition, an ad hoc committee, appointed by Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman and Columbus City Council Member Andy Ginther, developed 55 recommendations for improving accountability and student achievement in the Columbus City Schools, and three of those recommendations are addressed in this legislation.

The bill will now be sent to the Senate for consideration, although some speculate that it will be folded into Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget, which is currently being considered by the Senate.

National News

Schools Need Adequate Time to Implement Common Core: Four national education organizations released a joint statement on May 30, 2013 saying that schools need “adequate time” to prepare teachers, principals, students, and the community to achieve the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), but time is running out. The groups include the American Association of School Administrators (AASA), the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP), the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), and the National School Boards Association (NSBA). The statement outlines the following obstacles related to aligning the CCSS curriculum and implementing the new CCSS tests starting in 2014-15 school year:

  • The date to begin online assessment of the CCSS is arbitrary.
  • There must be time to consider the implications for bandwidth, infrastructure, and professional development as it relates to online assessment. -There must be adequate time to consider how assessments can be used to provide useful information about instruction to schools in a timely manner.
  • States and districts need time to properly address data collection issues.
  • Educators need time to adjust to the shift in practices and expectations of CCSS and the related assessments.
  • Schools and districts need time to identify, acquire, and implement the essential technology infrastructure and equipment that is needed, especially at the elementary level, to support the delivery of new online assessments.
  • School districts need time to educate the community, including media, about the reasons CCSS are important; to inform them about the changes in content and instruction the CCSS will bring about; and to manage expectations when early results on new assessments will likely be lower because of higher standards, new instruction and curriculum for teachers and students.

According to the statement, “Getting this transition right can mean the difference between getting and keeping public and educator support for the Common Core or a loss in confidence in the standards and even the public schools, especially if as expected the first-year scores will disappoint.”

School Leadership Groups Urge “Adequate Time” to Implement Common Core Standards
The undersigned groups, representing AASA, NAESP, NASSP, and NSBA, May 30, 2013.

This Week at the Statehouse: The Ohio House and Senate will hold hearings and sessions this week. The Senate is expected to consider Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget, on Thursday, June 6, 2013.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on June 4, 2013 at 11:15 AM in the North hearing room. The committee will review Governor Kasich’s appointments:

  •  Wanda L. Carter, Kenneth L. Kutina and James R. Wilson to the Ohio Higher Educational Facility Commission.
  •  Kenneth C. Miller to the State Board of Career Colleges and Schools.

The committee will also hold an information hearing on HB167 (Heard/Grossman) Columbus Plan, which would authorize the Columbus City Schools board of education to levy property taxes and share the revenue with partnering community schools, and SB96 (LaRose) Social Studies Curriculum, which would require students to complete one unit of world history in the high school social studies curriculum.

The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, will meet on June 4, 2013, at 1:00 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will consider an omnibus amendment to HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget; will receive public testimony regarding HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget; and will review the following appointments by Governor Kasich:

  •  James F. Dicke and Robert J. Hankins to the Ohio Arts Council.
  •  Stacey L. Hoffman and Jamie K. Oxendine to the Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board.
  •  Bruce A. Langos to the Third Frontier Commission.
  •  Kay E. Reiter to the Terra State Community College Board of Trustees.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, will meet on June 5, 2013 at 10:00 AM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room. The committee will receive testimony on Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget. A vote is possible.

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on June 5, 2013 at 10:15 AM in the South hearing room. The committee will hold an information hearing on HB167 (Heard/Grossman) Columbus Plan, which would authorize the Columbus City Schools board of education to levy property taxes and share the revenue with partnering community schools, and SB96 (LaRose) Social Studies Curriculum, which would require students to complete one unit of world history in the high school social studies curriculum.

The House Ways and Means Committee, chaired by Representative Beck, will meet on June 5, 2013 at 3:00 PM in room 116. The committee will receive testimony on SB42 Property Taxes-School Security (Manning/Gardner), which would authorize school districts to levy a property tax exclusively for school safety and security purposes.

The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, will meet on June 5, 2013 at 4:30 PM in hearing Room 121. The committee will receive testimony on the following bills:

  • HB158 (Brenner/Patmon) Nonrefundable Tax Credits-Nonpublic Schools, which would authorize nonrefundable tax credits for donations to nonprofit entities providing scholarships to low-income students enrolling in nonpublic schools.
  • HB8 (Roegner) School Safety Laws.
  • HB113 (Antonio/Henne) High School Physical Education, which would specify that school districts and chartered nonpublic schools may excuse from high school physical education students who participate in a school-sponsored athletic club.
  • HB171 (McClain/Patmon) Religious Instruction, which would permit public school students to attend and receive credit for released time courses in religious instruction conducted off school property during regular school hours.

Senate Committee Accepts Substitute Bill: The Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Oelslager, accepted a substitute bill for Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget on May 28, 2013. The substitute bill didn’t include changes for the K-12 state school funding formula. Those changes are expected to be included in an omnibus amendment, which the committee will receive this week. According to Senate President Keith Faber, the $61.5 billion budget bill is still on track for adoption by the end of June and the start of the new fiscal year on July 1, 2013.

The substitute bill is $7.5 million below House total General Revenue Funds, but that is expected to change when the Senate Finance Committee considers the omnibus amendment that includes changes in the state’s funding formula for K-12 education. According to initial reports, the Senate intends to increase funding for K-12 education by $717 million over FY13 levels.

The proposed budget also does not include the Medicaid expansion provision championed by Governor Kasich. Senate and House leaders are currently working on separate legislation to expand health care to low income Ohioans.

Among the significant changes proposed by Senate Republicans in the substitute bill are the reinstatement of Governor Kasich’s tax cuts for small businesses, included in the budget as introduced. To pay for the tax cuts the Senate Committee eliminated the House provision to provide a 7 percent tax cut for all taxpayers. Senators also added $26 million more to the Clean Ohio Fund, bringing the total to $52 million for the biennium, and added another $1.6 million to the budget of the Ohio Arts Council, bringing its total in General Revenue Funds to $22.648 million for the biennium.

Senate Changes Address Some But Not All Education Concerns: The substitute budget bill (Am. Sub. HB59 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget) accepted by the Senate Finance Committee last week included some of the policy changes regarding K-12 education requested by witnesses over the past two weeks, but not all.

Requests included in Sub. HB59: The following are some of the requested changes that were included in the Senate substitute version of HB59:

  • Adjusts the six percent cap so that more school districts can benefit from the state aid funding formula. Many school districts believe that the gain cap on increases in state aid in the House version of HB59 is still too high, and too many school districts are on the gain cap. The Senate funding plan, which will be further clarified this week, provides more state aid to school districts by increasing the gain cap.
  • Removes the academic distress commission aimed at the Columbus City Schools. The House recently passed HB167 (Heard/Grossman) Columbus City Schools Plan, which includes provisions to address accountability issues regarding the Columbus City Schools’ mishandling of attendance data, therefore eliminating the need to establish the academic distress commission. Some believe that HB167 will be added to HB59.
  • Removes a provision prohibiting a school district from using public transit buses as a means to transport pupils in grades kindergarten through five to and from school.
  • Reinstates current law defining the school week as five days.
  • Removes the provision from the bill requiring that, if a state institution of higher education issues a student a letter or utility bill to use as proof for voting purposes in Ohio, the student must be granted residency status by rule of the Chancellor of the Board of Regents for the purpose of state subsidy and tuition surcharges.
  • Prescribes that the student academic growth factor must account for 35 percent (rather than 50 percent as under current law) of each evaluation under the standards-based state framework for evaluation of teachers developed by the State Board of Education.
  • Specifies that, when calculating student academic growth for a teacher evaluation, students who have had 30 or more excused or unexcused absences for the school year must be excluded (rather than excluding students with 60 or more unexcused absences as under current law).
  • Restores to current law the teacher and non-teaching minimum salary schedules.
  • Restores funding to executive proposed levels for teacher/principal evaluation funding in line item 200448.
  • Reinstate current law requiring educational service centers to receive $6.50 per student from each district they serve.
  • Allows school districts to participate in the Local Government Innovation Fund.

Requests not included in HB59: Superintendents, treasurers, and representatives of education organizations urged the Senate Finance Committee last week to change several HB59 provisions that could negatively impact schools and districts, and establish a mechanism for determining an adequate formula amount per pupil for funding schools.

School Funding Formula: Senate leadership announced last week that changes in the House version of the HB59 regarding state funding for schools were coming in an omnibus amendment that the Senate Finance Committee will consider this week. The Senate is expected to increase the formula amount from $5,732 to $5,745 in FY14 and from $5,789 in FY15 to $5,800. More details will be available this week.

Payment in Lieu of Transportation: Retains a House provision that changes the way parents are reimbursed when school districts find that transportation of students is impractical. Several witnesses requested that the provision to change current law regarding “payment in lieu of transportation” be removed. In current law school districts work with parents when it is not practical to transport students, and parents receive a payment from the state. Am. Sub. HB59 establishes a new process which directs the Ohio Department of Education to work with the parent, rather than the school district, and increases the “payment in lieu of transportation”, which is deducted from the school district state aid. Since state aid for transportation is already underfunded and must be supplemented with local district revenue, school districts will not be able to afford this change.

Transportation: Removes provisions in current law that are incentives for school districts to transport students. Retains the House provision that includes state funding for transportation in the state aid formula, subjecting the amount of state funds allocated to schools for transportation to the gain cap. Does not address the cost of replacing buses. In the past the state has provided some support to help school districts purchase buses.

Catastrophic Costs for Special Education: Retains the House levels for funding special education catastrophic costs, which most witnesses told the Senate Committee was insufficient.

ADM: Retains the House provision that school districts take a monthly pupil count. Witnesses testified that this provision is impractical to implement and would lead to significant planning problems. Currently school districts take one count of all students in October, but it takes on average three months to verify the results.

Vouchers: Retains the expanded voucher programs. Superintendents and representatives from education organizations testified that many effective and excellent school districts, especially those is rural Ohio, could have a large number of students who would qualify for the expanded EdChoice voucher program based on family income. These districts could be financially harmed if a large number of students left the district to attend private schools. They also noted that if the expanded voucher program continued in future biennia, it could provide public funds to almost all students attending private schools in a few years, increasing the overall cost for K-12 education for the state.

Gifted Education: Advocates for gifted education support the House provision regarding the expenditure of funds for subgroups of students and are disappointed that the Senate restored language from the Executive version of the budget. The House version required school districts and schools to account for the expenditure of state education funds provided for services to subgroups of students, including students identified as gifted in superior cognitive ability and specific academic ability fields under Chapter 3324 of the Revised Code.

Contract-Out Provisions (Section 3317.40): Modifies a provision that requires school districts that fail to show “satisfactory achievement and progress”, as determined by the State Board of Education, serving subgroups of students (special education, economically disadvantaged, ELL and students identified as gifted in superior cognitive ability and specific academic ability), to submit an improvement plan to the ODE for approval. The ODE may require the school district to partner with other organizations to provide services to these students. Witnesses testified that this provision is impractical to implement, because state aid only provides a portion of the full cost to provide services to subgroups of students anyway, and school districts already contract out many of these services to other organizations.

Additional Concerns As A Result of the Senate Amendments: Some of the changes that the Senate made to HB59 raised additional concerns for witnesses last week.

For example, representatives of BASA, OSBA, and OASBO asked the committee to reconsider a new Senate provision that changes the composition of the boards of education of joint vocational school districts (JVSD). The members of JVSD boards are now selected from among the elected representatives of participating districts. The Senate version of the bill would require JVSD board members to be selected from regional employers, which would duplicate the membership of the JVSD business advisory boards, which currently include representatives of regional employers and others in the community who are involved in career education.

Another provision added by the Senate would prohibit boards of education from filing appeals on property values for real estate taxes within their districts. Boards of education often challenge the value of properties through the Board of Revisions process in order to ensure that real property is valued fairly for tax purposes, so that school districts receive the tax dollars that they are due to operate the schools, and all tax payers are treated fairly.

Highlights of Senate Committee Changes for HB59: The following are highlights of the amendments that were accepted in a substitute bill for HB59 by the Senate Finance Committee last week regarding K-12 education. This list was compiled from the Senate Finance Committee’s list of amendments, and is arranged by topics.

FUNDING CHANGES

  • Increases funding for the Ohio Arts Council subsidy line item by $825,000 per fiscal year and the operational line item by $50,000 per fiscal year.
  • Decreases the appropriation for Adult Basic and Literacy Education in Board of Regents’ budget by $250,000 in each fiscal year and eliminates the earmarking language.
  • Revises the set-aside for college pre-boarding schools, as it is expected this entity will not open until FY15.
  • Sets aside $600,000 in FY15 from non-GRF fund 1060 in line item 055612, General Reimbursement, to create the Ohio BCI Forensic Research and Professional Training Center at Bowling Green State University.
  • Sets aside in non-GRF fund 7017 appropriation item 200648, Straight A Fund, up to $70,000 in each fiscal year for Kids Unlimited of Toledo for after-school tutoring and mentoring programs in two elementary schools. Requires Kids Unlimited of Toledo to provide local matching funds equal to the earmark.
  • Utilizes $5 million in FY15 in non-GRF fund 7017 appropriation item 200648, Straight A Fund, to support the implementation of the Administration’s College Credit Plus Program.
  • Earmarks $250,000 in each fiscal year in non-GRF appropriation item 200648, Straight A Fund, for the purpose of providing grants to Promise Neighborhood programs for administrative costs associated with the Promise Neighborhood program. Specifies that a grant recipient must contribute local matching funds equal to the amount of the grant.
  • Makes interested party requested changes to the New Leaders for Ohio’s Schools set-aside in the Department of Education budget.
  • Deletes the Preparing Students for Education Success Grant Program and instead earmarks $500,000 per fiscal year of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families for the Ohio Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs.
  • Earmarks $50,000 in each fiscal year in GRF appropriation item 200468, Ready to Learn, for the operations of the “Ready, Set, Go…to Kindergarten” program in Lorain County, and creates certain reporting requirements.

MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

  • Removes an uncodified provision of the bill that allows the Superintendent of Public Instruction to create a five-member academic distress commission for any school district that is found by the Auditor of State to have knowingly manipulated student data with evidence of intent to deceive.
  • Removes a provision that prohibits grants from being awarded from the Local Government Innovation Fund to city, local, exempted village, and joint vocational school districts, educational service centers, community schools, STEM schools, college-preparatory boarding schools, and educational consortia beginning July 1, 2013. Removes a provision that prohibits loans from being awarded from the Local Government Innovation Fund to such entities beginning July 1, 2014. Under continuing law, the Local Government Innovation Fund provides loans and grants to local government innovation projects.
  • Authorizes the board of directors of a municipal school district transformation alliance to hold an executive session, as if it were a public body with public employees, for any of the reasons for which an executive session may be held under the Open Meetings Act (R.C. 121.22).
  • Removes a provision creating the new Workforce Training Pilot Program for the Economically Disadvantaged.

SCHOOL FUNDING FORMULA

  • Makes a technical amendment to the definition of “net formula ADM” which is used to calculate targeted assistance for school districts. Current law removes e-school and all scholarship students except those with a Jon Peterson Special Needs scholarship from this calculation. This amendment also removes JPSN scholarship students.

ACCOUNTABILITY

  • Eliminates a provision that would require districts to report spending based on subgroups by building, and reinstates the “as introduced language”, which states that it is the intent of the General Assembly that funds provided for subgroups of students be used for services that will allow students in those subgroups to master the knowledge base required for high school graduation.

STEM SCHOOLS

  • Permits a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) school to contract for any services necessary for the operation of the school. Specifies that the governing body of each STEM school must “engage the services of” administrative officers, teachers, and nonteaching employees, instead of “employ and fix the compensation” of such individuals as under current law. Specifies that the governing body of each STEM school must “engage the services of” a chief administrative officer, instead of “employ” such an individual as under current law.

POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT OPTIONS/COLLEGE CREDIT PLUS

  • Specifies that the Department of Education is prohibited from reimbursing a participating college for any college course or remedial college course taken by a participating student under the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program. The House version of the bill stated that the ODE was not required to pay for any course that is not included in, or is the equivalent to, a transfer module or the Chancellor of the Board of Regents’ Transfer Assurance Guide.
  • Requires the Chancellor to report to the General Assembly by December 31, 2013, on recommendations to establish the College Credit Plus program, for high school students to earn credits through Ohio institutions of higher education. Requires the Chancellor to consult with the Inter-University Council of Ohio, the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio, the Ohio Association of Community Colleges, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction in developing the recommendations.
  • Requires the Department of Education annually to compile a list of all institutions of higher education that currently participate in the Post-Secondary Enrollment Options Program (PSEO) or in other dual enrollment programs and, not later than December 31 of each school year, to distribute that list to all school districts, community schools, STEM schools, and chartered nonpublic schools in the state. Requires a district or school to provide the list of participating higher education institutions, as part of the counseling services required of the district or school prior to a student’s participation in PSEO, to both the interested student and the student’s parents or guardians.

EXPENDITURE RANKING

  • Makes a technical clarification of as-introduced provision that expenditures are reported by ODE on an “equivalent pupil basis” and not a “per pupil basis” for school operating expenditure ranking.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

  • Exempts from childcare regulation preschool programs that are operated by nonchartered, nontax-supported schools, provided that those programs meet specified conditions.

TRANSPORTATION

  • Eliminates the provision prohibiting a school district from using public transit buses as a means to transport pupils in grades kindergarten through five to and from school.

STATE MINIMUM SCHOOL YEAR

  • Reinstates current law defining the school week as five days. (The bill changes the minimum school year to one based on hours, rather than days as under current law.)
  • Removes the requirement that a school district board of education publish notice of the required public hearing on the adoption of a new school calendar in a newspaper in the district not later than 30 days prior to the hearing.

EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTERS

  • Reinstates the current law requirement that the Department of Education annually deduct from each client school district of each educational service center and pay to that service center an amount equal to $6.50 times the school district’s total student count. (The bill repeals the current codified law regarding state payments and the $6.50 per student district payment and, instead, specifies in a temporary, uncodified provision a formula for state payments subject to the appropriation for that purpose. The amendment does not affect that uncodified provision.)
  • Reinstates current law that permits the board of education of any client school district to pay an amount in excess of $6.50 per student and that specifies, if a majority of a service center’s districts approve the higher amount, the Department must deduct the approved excess from all of the service center’s client school districts.
  • Permits a joint vocational school district to enter into a fee-for-service agreement with an educational service center (ESC) in the same manner as a city, exempted village, or local school district.
  • Permits a school district or community school that has entered into a fee-for-service agreement with an ESC to direct the Department of Education to make deductions and transfers of funds to cover the payments owed under the agreements.
  • Authorizes school districts, community schools, or STEM schools to agree to share any services offered by an educational service center (ESC) with any other school districts, community schools, or STEM schools provided that each participant in those shared services specifies in its service agreement: the amount of funds it will be contributing toward the total cost of the shared services, the services that will be shared, and the other participating districts or schools.
  • Provides that a participant’s funding contribution must be paid in a manner that is statutorily permitted.
  • Specifies that the authority described above is in addition to the authority to share the services of supervisory teachers, special instruction teachers, special education teachers, and other licensed personnel granted to school district boards of education under continuing law.

TEACHERS/PRINCIPALS

  • Prescribes that the student academic growth factor must account for 35 percent (rather than 50 percent as under current law) of each evaluation under the standards-based state framework for evaluation of teachers developed by the State Board of Education. Permits a school district to attribute an additional percentage to the student academic growth factor, not to exceed 15 percent of each evaluation.
  • Specifies that, when calculating student academic growth for a teacher evaluation, students who have had 30 or more excused or unexcused absences for the school year must be excluded (rather than excluding students with 60 or more unexcused absences as under current law).
  • Restores to current law the teacher and nonteaching minimum salary schedules.
  • Restores funding to executive proposed levels for teacher/principal evaluation funding in line item 200448.

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

  • Eliminates provisions of current law and the bill that exclude any student enrolled in an Internet- or computer-based community school from the average daily membership reported by the superintendent of each city, local, and exempted village school district of the district’s students enrolled in each category of career-technical education programs.
  • Makes a technical correction to House changes to ensure that community schools and STEM schools are assigned to a career-technical planning district (CTPD) and that the lead district would approve career technical programming.
  • Restores current law eliminated by the House requiring community schools and STEM schools to use career technical education (CTE) funding only for what ODE approves for CTE expenses. Language also clarifies House added language which subjects member districts of a JVSD, community school, and STEM schools offering programs at their facilities to these spending requirements.

Career Tech Extended Programming: Requires extended career tech programming offered by school districts be used for activities that involve direct contact with students, or are directly related to student programs and activities, and be provided for at least one hour on any given day that it is provided. However, the amendment also provides that extended programming funds may be used for teacher professional development activities.

For the purpose of providing extended programming, permits a school district to employ certificated instructional personnel for hours outside of the normal school day. With respect to licensed educators providing extended programming, requires that a school district board pay each educator on an hourly basis at the regular per diem rate determined under the educator’s employment contract or collective bargaining agreement, and the educator not provide more than eight hours of extended programming in a twenty-four hour day.

Agriculture Education: Requires all agricultural education instructors to utilize a three-part model of agricultural education instruction focusing on classroom instruction, FFA activities, and extended programming projects. Requires agricultural education instructors to submit a monthly time log to the principal of the school at which the extended programming is offered or the principal’s designee, for review.

Increases GRF appropriation 200545, Career-Technical Education Enhancements, by $300,000 in each fiscal year and commensurately increases the amount earmarked each fiscal year from this appropriation item for the Agriculture 5th Quarter Project, from $300,000 to $600,000.

Adds a non-substantive description of the cross-reference regarding the approval of a community school’s career-technical education programs by the lead district of a career-technical planning district or the Department of Education prior to deduction and payment of career-technical education funds to a community school.

Requires a city, local, exempted village, or joint vocational school district, community school, or STEM school to spend at least 75 percent of the state career-technical education funding it receives on costs directly associated with career-technical education programs and not more than 25 percent on personnel expenditures. An existing State Board of Education rule (O.A.C. 3301-61-16) prescribes these same percentages for these same purposes for the expenditure of career-technical education funds by all types of providers.

Replaces the current method of appointing members of a joint vocational school district (JVSD) board of education with a system where the school districts that belong to a JVSD each appoint one member to a JVSD board. Requires the appointing board to select members who represent regional employers and who are qualified to consider a region’s workforce needs. Limits a JVSD board to the number of member school districts. Specifies that a term of office for a JVSD board member be three years and limits members to two consecutive terms. Specifies that no more than three members of the board be affiliated with or be a member of a labor organization. Requires two members of the board to be selected based on their experience in career development and career counseling for grades K-12 and career counseling for adult education.

COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

  • Specifies that a community school that offers any of grades 4 to 8 and does not offer a grade higher than grade 9, in at least two of the three most recent school years, must have been both, in a state of academic emergency and showed less than one standard year of academic growth in either reading or mathematics, as determined by the Department of Education, to trigger permanent closure of that school after July 1, 2013.
  • Modifies the provision which allows e-schools to split into two schools if in operation by the effective date of the bill. The language is needed to ensure the past performance of these schools follows the two newly created e-schools for report card purposes.
  • Guarantees that, in FY14 and FY15, a community school that was declared to be excellent higher on the local report cards for the 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 school years receives at least the amount of the community school’s payments for FY13.
  • Specifies that the initial term under agreement between the Department of Education and a community school sponsor runs for up to seven years. Unless a sponsor notifies the Department that it does not wish to have the term of the agreement extended, requires the Department to add one year to the agreement term for every year that the sponsor either (1) prior to January 1, 2015, is not ranked in the bottom 20 percent of sponsors statewide according to composite performance index score, or (2) on and after January 1, 2015, is rated as “exemplary” or “effective” under the new sponsor rating system that will be in place at that time, and in either case continues to meet all the statutory requirements pertaining to community school sponsors.
  • Streamlines language of current law regarding grand-fathered community school sponsors not subject to approval by the Department of Education, and clarifies that those sponsors may continue to sponsor community schools and enter into new contracts to sponsor community schools so long as the contracts conform with the Community School Law.
  • Exempts students enrolled in Internet or computer-based schools from the physical education requirement to graduate from high school. Exempts students that are enrolled in e-schools from the requirements for students currently attending districts or schools that chose to participate in the physical activity pilot project.
  • Exempts a community school primarily comprised of students with disabilities from the current law requirement that each teacher teaching a core subject area take all written examinations of content knowledge selected by the Department of Education, if the school is ranked in the lowest 10 percent of all public school buildings according to performance index score.
  • Revises a provision that requires a community school to develop a plan if they are found to be noncompliant by requiring the Department of Education to approve or disapprove the compliance plan.
  • Clarifies a provision that suspended community schools have until September 30th of the following school year in which the operation was suspended to remedy the conditions cited by the sponsor before the school’s contract is void. Adds language that community schools suspended prior to the date of the amendment have until September 30, 2014 to comply.
  • Specifies that appropriation item 200684, Community School Facilities, is to be used to pay STEM schools $100 per pupil for the cost of facilities (in addition to being used to pay community schools $100 per pupil, a provision that is included in the “House Passed” bill).

NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS

  • Exempts students of chartered nonpublic schools accredited through the Independent School Association of the Central States from passing the end-of-course examinations as a prerequisite for graduation from high school.¨
  • Eliminates the bill’s requirements allowing students of nonpublic schools or those receiving home instruction to participate in extracurricular activities provided by public schools in their resident district.
  • Eliminates the bill’s grant of discretion to a school district superintendent to allow students of nonpublic schools or those receiving home instruction, living outside their district, to participate in certain of that district’s extracurricular activities.
  • Increases to $360 (from $325 under current law) the maximum per pupil amount for reimbursement of chartered nonpublic school administrative costs.
  • Restores as-introduced temporary language allowing the Department of Education to contract out the evaluation of the Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program.
  • Qualifies a student for an Educational Choice Scholarship if the student will be enrolling in school in Ohio for the first time (instead of “eligible to enroll in kindergarten,” as in current law) in the school year for which the scholarship is sought and the school district or district building the student would otherwise attend qualifies for scholarships (including the bill’s new qualification beginning in the 2016-2017 school year for students in buildings with a “D” or “F” on the K-3 literacy grade). Therefore, under the amendment, students moving to Ohio from another state and students who were previously homeschooled, regardless of their grade level, will be eligible for scholarships.

BOARD OF REGENTS

  • Removes the provision from the bill requiring that, if a state institution of higher education issues a student a letter or utility bill to use as proof for voting purposes in Ohio, the student must be granted residency status by rule of the Chancellor of the Board of Regents for the purpose of state subsidy and tuition surcharges.
  • Re-establishes GRF appropriation item 235434, College Readiness and Access, with an appropriation of $1.2 million in each fiscal year. Specifies that funds are to be used by the Chancellor to support early college high school initiatives and requires the Chancellor to distribute grants equal to $2,000 per student to each institution of higher education supporting an early college high school. Permits the Chancellor to decrease the per student grant amount if appropriations are inadequate to provide full grant awards.

Bills Introduced

  • HB178 (Phillips) School Safety Drills: Changes the number of times per school year that the principal or person in charge of a school or educational institution shall conduct drills or rapid dismissals during the school year from nine to five, and makes other changes in law regarding school safety drills.

FYI ARTS

UK Debating Loss of Arts Education: According to a report aired on Southern California Public Radio (89.3 KPCC) some lawmakers in the United Kingdom (UK) are so concerned about the loss of arts education in schools that they are recommending that achievement in the arts become a requirement for high school graduation as part of the English Baccalaureate (Ebacc). The arts would become the “sixth” pillar, as they are known, along with English, science, math, languages and a humanities subject such as history.

Arts Ed UK style: a look at the movement abroad by Mary Plummer, May 23, 2013, 12:00pm,

What is the Point of Teaching the Arts: Wendy Earle writes for Spiked that the future of arts education in the United Kingdom (UK) has recently become a matter of public discussion as arts education advocates struggle to convince policy makers, who are focused on math, reading, and science, about the value of a citizenry knowledgeable about the arts.

The article describes the history of arts education programming in the UK schools, which is similar to the United States. In fact, educators in the UK over the years have promoted the role of the arts in the education of the “whole child” and implemented discipline-based art education (DBAE), which became a model for the national curriculum for art in the UK.

Also like the U.S., the focus on math, science, and literacy starting in the late nineties forced schools to scale-back arts education programming, and as a result education in the arts has been marginalized in the UK. Two government-commissioned reports, Arts Education in Secondary Schools: Effects and Effectiveness (Harland et al 2000); and Cultural Education in England (Henley, 2012) describe how arts education has become increasingly extra-curricular, provided by agencies external to schools, and inaccessible to many students.

As policy-makers pushed the arts out of the curriculum, arts education advocates identified a variety of ways that the arts benefit students, the economy, society, and communities to justify public spending on the arts.

The author writes that in an effort to promote the value of arts education, arts education advocates have “exaggerated art’s ability to solve social ills and promote economic development.”

She concludes that “….the future of art is seriously at risk, not because the government does not recognise its importance, but because so little art is taught, even under the guise of arts education. We need to develop an alternative way of defending the value and importance of art and arts education.”

What is the Point of Teaching the Arts? Essay: Too many in the UK cultural sector seek to defend arts education in terms that have nothing to do with art” by Wendy Earle, Spiked, May 21, 2013.

Wendy Earle is impacts and knowledge exchange manager, Birkbeck, University of London and the convenor of Institute of Ideas Arts and Society Forum.

Fender Music Foundation Grants: The Fender Music Foundation awards grants to music academies, schools, local music programs, and national music programs across America, particularly in-school music classes, in which the students make music; after-school music programs that are not run by the school; and music therapy programs, in which the participants make the music. The maximum award is $5,000. To be eligible, programs must be established, ongoing, and sustainable, and provide music instruction for people of any age who would not otherwise have the opportunity to make music. Information is available at http://www.fendermusicfoundation.org/grants/.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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