Arts On Line Education Update 03.11.13

Ohio News

Selection of the Superintendent: The State Board of Education will meet on March 11 and 12, 2013 at the Ohio Department of Education and Board of Regents Building, 25 South Front Street, Columbus. One of the items on their agenda is the selection of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The State Board met last week to narrow the choices, and selected as the final two candidates Michael Sawyers, Acting Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Dick Ross, Executive Director of the Governor’s Office of 21st Century Education. The State Board is expected to announce the next superintendent on March 12, 2013.

Budget News: The Ohio House continues hearings this week on HB59 (Amstutz) the State Operating Budget for FY14-15. The Primary and Secondary Subcommittee of the House Finance and Appropriations Committee will complete invited testimony this week, and then receive public testimony on HB59.

The Ohio Senate will continue hearings on HB35, the Transportation Budget. The committee is expected to merge HB51 (McGregor) Ohio Turnpike Commission and HB35 Transportation Budget through a substitute bill.

Update on Sequestration – Ohio: The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) has identified 14 federal programs that currently provide support for schools in Ohio and could be subject to sequestration beginning in July 2013. The total federal support for these programs is $1.26 billion. Sequestration will reduce federal allocations for schools, but will not affect compliance requirements, such as Maintenance of Effort and Supplement, not Supplant. Reductions will not apply to grants already awarded, such as Race to the Top, the Teacher Incentive Fund, the Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, and Race to the Top Early Learning. The amount of the federal reductions for Ohio are not known at this time, but the ODE intends to develop a website that will provide updated information when available. The top-funded federal programs that will be affected by sequestration in Ohio are Title 1 ($588.3 million), Special Education ($436.9 million), Teacher Quality ($88 million), 21st Century Learning ($44 million), and Career Technical Education ($42 million).

Panel to Discuss Gifted Education: The Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the Ohio Association for Gifted Children will host Educating Our Brightest: Improving Gifted Education to Boost Ohio’s Prosperity and Success, a presentation and panel discussion about gifted education. The event will be held on March 20, 2013 from 7:30 – 9:00 AM at the Columbus Museum of Art, 480 E. Broad St. The panel will examine the state of gifted education in Ohio and discuss strategies to improve it. Panelists include Representative Bill Hayes; Chad Aldis, executive director of School Choice Ohio; Marty Bowe, superintendent of Perry Local School District; and Ann Sheldon, executive director of the Ohio Associated for Gifted Children.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

ODE Seeking Parents: The Ohio Department of Education is currently seeking parents to fill vacancies on the Superintendent’s Parent Advisory Council. The deadline to apply is March 22, 2013.

The application and additional information is available.

This Week at the Statehouse: The Ohio House and Senate will hold hearings and sessions this week as lawmakers continue to work on several legislative measures and the state’s operating budget, HB59 (Amstutz).

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

The House Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Hayes, will meet on March 12, 2013 at 8:30 AM in hearing room 017. The committee will receive testimony from the Alliance of Early Learning Advocates and public testimony on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget FY14-15.

The House Ways and Means Subcommittee on HB59 will meet on March 12, 2013 at 10:00 AM in hearing room 116 to continue testimony on proposed tax reforms. This hearing will focus on the personal income tax.

The House Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Rosenberger, will meet on March 12, 2013 at 6:00 PM in hearing room 121. The committee will receive testimony on HB59 (Amstutz), State Operating Budget FY14-15, from the following organizations:

  •  Ohio Student Government Association 
  •  Additional agency testimony
  •  Public testimony

The Joint Senate School Safety Committee will meet on March 12, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room to receive testimony about security, school infrastructure, and law enforcement response and protection.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

The House Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Hayes, will meet on March 13, 2013 at 8:30 AM in hearing room 017. The committee will receive public testimony on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget FY14-15.

The House Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Rosenberger, will meet on March 13, 2013 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 311. The committee will receive testimony on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget FY14-15, from the following organizations:

  •  Ohio Tuition Trust Authority 
  •  American Association of University Professors Ohio Conference
  •  Public testimony

The House Ways and Means Subcommittee on HB59 will meet on March 13, 2013 at 3:00 PM in hearing room 116 to continue testimony on proposed tax reforms. This hearing will focus on the severance tax.

Thursday, March 14, 2013

The House Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Hayes, will meet on March 14, 2013 at 8:30 AM in hearing room 017. The committee will receive public testimony on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget FY14-15.

The House Ways and Means Subcommittee on HB59 will meet on March 14, 2013 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116 to continue testimony on proposed tax reforms.

The House Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Rosenberger, will meet on March 14, 2013 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 121. The committee will receive public testimony on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget FY14-15.

What’s Changing in Ohio’s Education System? Several initiatives are currently underway to revamp Ohio’s preK-20 education system over the next few years. The areas that will be affected include New Learning Standards, Educator Evaluations, Next Generation of Assessments, and School and District Report Cards. The changes are a result of Ohio’s participation in the federal Race to the Top Grant; Ohio’s participation in the federal Race to the Top Early Learning Grant; Ohio’s request for a waiver of provisions under the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA); the recommendations of the State Board of Education; and new laws enacted by the 129th General Assembly, such as HB555 (Stebelton) and SB316 (Lehner).

The following is information provided by representatives of the Ohio Department of Education at a March 8, 2013 meeting:

Report Card Update: The State Board of Education is currently developing a new report card for 2012-13 school year and beyond based on changes in law. The new report cards will grade schools and districts based on an A-F letter grade system and include new and former measures, such as the performance index; performance indicators; value added; annual measurable objectives; graduation rates; and high school progress. The 2012-13 report card will include eight graded measures; the 2013-14 report card will include nine graded measures; and the 2014-15 report card will include ten graded measures.

The graded measures will be combined to form six components: Gap Closing; Achievement; Graduation Rates; Progress; K-3 Literary; and Prepared for Success. Schools and districts will receive a grade for each of the components and a composite grade beginning in August 2015.

Other measures will be reported on the report card, but will not be included in a composite grade.

The State Board of Education’s Accountability Committee, chaired by Tom Gunlock, is tasked with developing the key elements of the new report card. The committee is currently seeking comments on the format of the new report card; the level of detail that should be included for each component on the new report card; the organization of the components; the types of historical and trend data that could be included; and the type of data that could be included to compare schools/districts. The committee is also interested in recommendations for additional information that could be included on the report card, such as student participation in extra-curricular activities; student participation in the arts, world languages, or other non-tested subjects; and special recognitions for students, such as the number and types of scholarships (from colleges and universities) that students have received and have accepted.

The current report card draft is available.

Comments about the draft should be submitted to
newreportcard@education.ohio.gov.

PARCC Guidelines Released: The Ohio Department of Education is urging schools and school districts to complete the PARCC Assessment Administration Capacity Planning Tool released in March 2013.

Ohio joined a consortium of states, called the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), to help implement new assessments to replace the Ohio Achievement Exams and the Ohio Graduation Test starting in 2014-15. The new exams are aligned to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and math. Ohio is also developing online assessments for science and social studies.

High school students, beginning with the Class of 2017, will meet new graduation requirements that include 20 course credits based on Ohio’s new learning standards, and the results of up to ten “end of course exams”, when all of the end of course exams are phased-in for the Class of 2016. Tenth grade students will also take a nationally standardized test of college and career readiness.

The new exams will include a performance-based assessment, administered during the school year, and an end of year assessment. Since the assessments will be delivered and completed online, schools will not be required to administer the exams at the same time to all students. The intent is for the assessments to become more integrated into instruction. The total amount of time needed to complete the new exams is estimated to be between 8 and 9.5 hours.

The PARCC Assessment Tool allows school district administrators to enter information about their school technology capacity, and model a range of possible configurations for testing devices, bandwidth utilization, and the number of administration days needed to implement the new assessments. The tool can be used to identify technology gaps and determine possible solutions. HB59 (Amstutz), the proposed state operating budget for FY14-15, also includes $10 million to fund needed upgrades in technology.

Information about the new assessments and PARCC guidelines is available.

More Testimony on HB59: Several witnesses testified last week before the House Finance and Appropriations Committee, Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Hayes, on HB59 (Amstutz) State Operating Budget for FY14-15. The following are summaries of the testimonies presented for gifted education, career technical education, and educational service centers.

Gifted Education: Ann Sheldon, executive director of the Ohio Association for Gifted Children (OAGC) provided lead testimony on the impact of HB59 (Amstutz) on gifted education, and was accompanied by six other witnesses, including students, parents, and teachers.

According to the testimony services to gifted students in Ohio have “plummeted by 35 percent over the past four years”. While in 1999 forty-one percent of identified gifted students were served, in 2012 eighteen percent were being served. Over the past four years staffing for gifted programs has been reduced by 16 percent, and the identification of gifted students has declined by six percent. Although by law school districts are required to use the same level of gifted funding that the state allocated in 2009, 375 school districts have reduced gifted services and over 200 school districts reported that they did not serve any gifted children.

The overall funding for gifted education included in HB59 (Amstutz), $85.2 million ($50 per ADM), is comparable to gifted unit funding totals in past budgets, but the bill “does not include proper accountability and transparency for how the funds are spent.” The testimony explains that the proposed state funding level for gifted education is not based on any cost data, although expenditure data is collected by the Ohio Department of Education, and could be used to develop a “defensible funding formula for gifted students.”

The proposed plan for funding gifted education in HB59 also does not “follow the gifted student” and ensure that the resources provided by the state will be used by schools/districts to provide services for students. For example, charter schools, which are not even required by law to identify gifted students, would receive $5 million, and school districts that don’t even serve gifted students would receive $19 million. These funds should be used to identify and serve gifted children where ever they are located.

Concerns were also expressed about the impact of the loss of gifted funding for educational service centers, which provide gifted services, coordinators, curriculum, and other supports to school districts.

Other concerns included in the testimony were the lack of appropriate output measures for all gifted students; the lack of recourse for parents of gifted children who are not being served or appropriately served; the lack of alternative providers in Ohio to serve gifted students who fail to show progress; and the proposed changes for Operating Standards. According to the testimony, the proposed changes for Operating Standards set a low level for high school graduation.

Supporting the testimony were students Emma-Jean Stanley and Hayley Curran, who provided personal perspectives about their experiences in gifted education programs and their disappointments and frustrations when programs were not available. Parents Kathleen Stanley and Kimberly Curran requested that HB59 be amended to require funding for gifted education be used for the identification of gifted students and services for gifted students.

Sally Roberts, the past president of the Ohio Association for Gifted Children, also testified, and recommended the following changes in HB59 to support gifted education:
•Link gifted funding to service for students identified as gifted.
•Require that qualified staff oversee gifted service models and delivery.
•Implement accountability for academic growth of gifted students that is meaningful. The proposed rewrite of the operating standards to cover only health and safety concerns and the requirements necessary to ensure each student “has mastered a common knowledge base in order to graduate from high school” is a low level standard that will suppress the growth of the state’s highest achieving students.
•Hold districts accountable for achievement results, and ensure financial transparency regarding about how gifted funds are spent and how gifted students are served.

Testimony was also submitted by Barbara Bodart, a gifted coordinator with the Licking County ESC; Brenda Gift, a Supervisor with the Education Service Center of Lake Erie West; and Sandra Freeman, a gifted coordinator at the Western Buckeye ESC. They explained how educational service centers support gifted education, including classroom support, coordinated services, curriculum specialists, and professional development, and requested that gifted funded be used to support gifted education programs so that money follows the child, and educational service centers continue to receive funding for gifted education.

Educational Service Centers (ESC): Craig Burford, executive director of the Ohio ESC Association, presented lead testimony about the changes for educational services centers included in HB59 (Amstutz). Testimony was also provided by Bob Caldwell, Tom Isaacs, Tom Goodney, and Vikki Clemons.

According to Mr. Burford’s testimony, Ohio’s 55 educational service centers provided direct services to 226,943 students; impacted 1.75 million students in the 2011-12 school year; and provided professional development and technical assistance and support services to 174,010 educational professionals. ESCs are also the largest providers of shared services, saving school districts an estimated $72 million annually, and provided $1.2 billion in support services to Ohio schools and other local government agencies.

The testimony explained that HB59 as introduced will negatively impact ESCs and exacerbate cost pressures for school districts, especially rural school districts and any districts on the guarantee that rely on ESC services. The changes proposed in the law will also affect the Ohio Department of Education, which depends on ESCs to deploy information and professional services to school districts.

HB59 will affect educational service centers in a variety of ways. The testimony requests the following changes:

  • Retain funding for the State ESC operating subsidy, local deduction, supervisory services deduction, preschool special education units, and gifted unit funding. HB59 proposes to reduce the ESC operating subsidy by 22.5 percent in FY14 (-$7.9 million), and by an additional 27.27 percent in FY15 (-$7.5 million). ESC funding will be reduced from the equivalent of $25.36 per pupil today to $13.87 in FY15. HB59 also eliminates the $6.50 local deduct (dollars will stay at the district-level -$11.5M); eliminates the Supervisory Services Unit deduct (dollars will stay at the district-level-$22.9M); replaces the Special Education Preschool Units with $4,000 per pupil funded at the district-level (-$34.3M); and replaces Gifted Units with $50 per pupil funded at the district-level (-$7.2M)
  • Maintain a state/local approach to ESC funding.
  • Ensure district choice and flexibility in service providers.
  • Provide ESCs with greater flexibility to control costs.
  • Eliminate barriers that may prohibit shared services through an ESC.
  • Maintain Publically-Elected ESC Governing Boards reflective of client districts.

Providing testimony in support of educational services were Bob Caldwell, Superintendent of Wolf Creek Local Schools; Tom Isaacs, Assistant Superintendent of the Warren County Educational Service Center; Tom Goodney, Interim Superintendent of the Educational Service Center (ESC) of Central Ohio; and Vikki Clemons, Executive Director of Instructional Services at the Hamilton County Educational Service Center.

Superintendent Caldwell explained how the Ohio Valley Educational Service Center uses the “shared service” model to partner with school districts to implement best practices, including formative instructional practices, differentiated instruction, and the Power Educator Project. The local ESC also supports school district Race to the Top initiatives, and provides expertise to support teachers in the district. These experts are likely to leave if ESCs lose their stable funding source.

Asst. Superintendent Isaacs described the variety of services that ESCs provide school districts, including alternative schools and programs for at-risk students and students with severe emotional disabilities; services for students with autism; preschool; training and professional development for teachers and principals; coordinating with higher education institutions to provide students access to college courses and STEM courses; and more. He also noted that ESCs have been governed by elected boards for over 60 years, and did not support diminishing the rights of citizens to elect officials.

Tom Goodney, Interim Superintendent of the Educational Service Center (ESC) of Central Ohio, explained about the number of services that ESCs provide, including services contracted by the Ohio Department of Education. The number of cuts to the general ESC operating subsidy will “constrain the ability of an ESC to provide both cost avoidance and cost savings to client districts and potentially erode the internal capacity of the ESC to effectively plan, coordinate, supervise and monitor the effectiveness of the special education and alternative education programs it provides.”

Vikki Clemons, Executive Director of Instructional Services at the Hamilton County Educational Service Center (HCESC) in Cincinnati, Ohio, also explained how the ESCs support the work of the Ohio Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Education. For example, sixteen ESCs serve as fiscal agents for Ohio’s State Support Teams focusing on supporting the effective use of the Ohio Improvement Process [OIP], improving results for Students with Disabilities, and Early Learning and School Readiness; ESCs provide support for State Personnel Development Grant [SPDG], the State Diagnostic Teams [SDT], State Performance Plan [SPP] Committees, School Improvement Grant [SIG] Schools, and Districts and State Level Design Team [SLDT] along with numerous other committees; and ten ESCs are partners with the ODE for the Race to the Top grant.

Career Technical Education: Speaking in support of Career Technical Education (CTE) and on behalf of both the Ohio Association of Career Technical Education (“Ohio ACTE”) and the Ohio Association of Career Technical Superintendents (“OACTS”) was Joyce Malainy Superintendent of C-TEC career center in Newark, Ohio.

CTE offers over 40 secondary programs in skilled trades and career preparation for high school juniors, seniors, and adult students in the evening and on weekends. Training is available in agriculture, architecture and construction, business management, health science, manufacturing, science and engineering, and transportation and logistics.

According to the testimony, the tiered funding for CTE programs included in HB59 (Amstutz) differs from the current weighted funding system. As a result the net effect on individual career centers and joint vocational schools (JVSD) varies widely, with some schools losing funding and some schools gaining funding. Overall 20 of the 49 JVSDs lose funding and 29 gain funding. The number of JVSDs on the guarantee also increases in FY15. Although Governor Kasich’s administration has reported that there is a 16 percent increase for CTE in HB59, ACTE and OACTS have not been able to find the increase.

Bassam Homsi, President & CEO of Autotool Inc. also presented testimony on behalf of the Ohio Association of Career Technical Education (Ohio ACTE) and Ohio Association of Career Technical Superintendents (OACTS). He explained how his business works with CTE schools and joint vocational schools to prepare students for manufacturing jobs. He urged the committee to ensure that career technical education was not underfunded or overlooked as the new funding formula was developed.

The testimonies presented to the House Primary and Secondary Subcommittee are available.

States Survey on ESEA Waivers Released: The Center on Education Policy at George Washington University, released on March 4, 2013 the results of a survey of states receiving waivers from the U.S. Department of Education regarding provisions of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), also known as the No Child Left Behind Act. (States’ Perspectives on Waivers: Relief from NCLB, Concern about Long-term Solutions by Jennifer McMurrer and Nanami Yoshioka, CEP, March 4, 2013.)

The U.S. Department of Education established the ESEA waiver process to address the problems that would have resulted if states failed to meet certain ESEA goals. Some of these goals have become impractical to achieve, and would have been addressed if the U.S. House, Senate, and President Obama could have come to an agreement to reauthorize ESEA. For example, ESEA requires that all students be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Many schools are not expected to meet this unrealistic goal, however, by not meeting the goal, schools set themselves up for severe consequences, unless a federal waiver from this provision is granted.

The U.S. Department of Education has granted 34 states and the District of Columbia ESEA waivers. Forty-four states have made requests, and six state requests are pending. But, in order to receive a waiver, states must agree to meet additional conditions that some policy makers believe are also unrealistic. And, several members of Congress believe that the U.S. Department of Education has overstepped its authority by granting the waivers and establishing additional requirements not approved by Congress. Some of the additional conditions that states must meet are establish college- and career-ready standards for all students; develop and implement differentiated recognition, accountability, and support systems for schools; develop and implement teacher and principal evaluation and support systems that include student achievement growth as a “significant” factor; and evaluate and remove duplicative and burdensome state reporting requirements.

The survey, conducted in the fall of 2012, describes the following state beliefs about the federal waiver:

  • States believe that the waivers address several of the problems they see with the NCLB accountability requirements, such as the unrealistic goal of 100 percent of students reaching proficiency by 2014 and mandated consequences for schools that did not always increase student achievement.
  • Most of the states surveyed anticipate that the accountability system in their waiver application will do a better job than NCLB at identifying schools in need of improvement.
  • A majority of the states surveyed expect the waiver requirements for college- and career-ready standards and for growth-based teacher and principal evaluation systems to improve student learning a great extent.
  • A majority of states agree that differentiated accountability systems will increase learning to a great or some extent.
  • Ten states reported amending their plans for new teacher evaluation systems due to the waiver.
  • Twelve states reported they had not intended to implement differentiated recognition systems for districts and schools in their states before applying for a waiver.
  • Twenty-nine of the 38 states surveyed are either piloting or implementing new teacher evaluation and support systems, and 11 of these states are using the results for personnel decisions. A similar number are piloting or implementing principal evaluations and support systems.
  • Eighteen states reported that they did not feel that public school choice or supplemental educational services were effectively raising student achievement.
  • Many survey states reported experiencing resistance to their teacher evaluation and support systems from teachers, teachers’ unions, and administrators.
  • States have mixed views about whether implementing the various aspects of the waivers will cost more than implementing similar NCLB provisions. More than half of the survey states indicated that the teacher evaluation and support systems required by the waiver will cost more to implement than comparable NCLB provisions.
  • A majority of states were apprehensive about the confusion the transition to amended ESEA requirements would cause, the costs and disruption involved in implementing yet another accountability system, and the loss of credibility that might ensue among educators, parents, and other stakeholders.
  • Some states were more neutral or optimistic that a reauthorized ESEA might be consistent with their waiver plans or might allow them to continue similar policies.

The full report is available.

State Board to Meet: The State Board of Education, Debe Terhar president, will meet on March 11 & 12, 2013 at the Ohio Department of Education and Board of Regents Building, 25 South Front Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215.

The State Board will meet at 9:00 AM on March 11, 2013. The Board will not conduct public business, but will move into executive session to interview two candidates for superintendent of public instruction: Michael Sawyers, Acting Superintendent, and Dick Ross, Executive Director of the Governor’s Office of 21st Century Education.

The Board will reconvene at 3:00 PM. The Achievement, Capacity, and Urban Schools committees will then meet. The State Board will adjourn for the day following the committee meetings.

The Achievement Committee will meet in room B005 to discuss and approve
a Resolution of Intent to Adopt Proposed Amendments to Rule 3301-52-01, Appropriate Uses of Early Child Education Screening and Assessment Information; receive a presentation on SB316 Career Connections; and receive a presentation on career technical education.

The Capacity Committee will meet in room B008 to discuss proposed new Rule 3301-102-08, Standards for Measuring Sponsor Compliance with Applicable Laws and Rules; discuss Rules 3301-83-09, -10, -16, -17, -21, -22 and 51-10 Pupil Transportation Rules; receive an update on ORC 3319.228 List of States with Inadequate Licensure Standards from a Panel of Experts; discuss Teacher Evaluation Framework for State Agencies; and receive an update on New Licensure Assessments by the Evaluation Systems Group of Pearson.

The Urban Education Committee will meet in room B007 and discuss recommendations for a comprehensive statewide plan to intervene directly in, and improve the performance of, persistently poor performing schools and school districts relative to HB555.

The State Board will meet also on March 12, 2013 starting at 9:00 AM. The Board will conduct a Chapter 119 hearing in room B001 on the following rules:

  • 3301-24-08, Professional or Associate License Renewal
  • 3301-24-19 to -22, Alternative Resident Educator License Rules
  • 3301-35-15, Restraint & Seclusion

The Legislative and Budget Committee will then meet to discuss SB21 (Lehner) Third Grade Guarantee, and receive a presentation on the Medicaid Schools Program.

The Board will then hold an executive session to select the superintendent of public instruction.

After the Board reconvenes it will receive public participation on agenda items; receive public participation on non-agenda items (at 1:00 PM); receive the report from the Search Committee regarding the selection of the Superintendent of Public Instruction; receive reports from the various committees; receive the report of the Acting Superintendent; vote on the report of the Acting Superintendent; vote on a resolution to select the next Superintendent of Public Instruction; consider old and new business; and adjourn.

Report of the Acting Superintendent of Public Instruction for March 11 & 12, 2013

#1 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-52-01 of the Ohio Administrative Code Entitled Appropriate Uses of Early Childhood Education Screening and Assessment Information.

#2 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-102-01 TO 3301-102-07 of the Ohio Administrative Code regarding community schools.

#3 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-1-2-08 of the Ohio Administrative Code entitled Standards for Measuring Sponsor Compliance with Applicable Laws and Rules.

#4 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-102-10 of the Ohio Administrative Code regarding the Academic Performance Rating and Report Card System for Community Schools that Serve Students Enrolled in Dropout Prevention and Recovery Programs.

#5 Approve a Resolution to Confirm and Approve the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Deny the Transfer of School District Territory from the Buckeye Central Local School District Seneca County to the Mohawk Local School District Seneca County, Pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#6 Approve a Resolution to Confirm and Approve the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Approve the Transfer of School District Territory from the Fairborn City School District, Green County to the Huber Heights City School District, Montgomery County, Pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#7 Approve a Resolution to Confirm and Approve the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Deny the Transfer of School District Territory from the Medina City School District Medina County to the Highland Local School District Medina County, Pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#14 Approve a Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-04-01 of the Ohio Administrative Code entitled Notice of Meetings.

#15 Approve a Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-23-44 of the Ohio Administrative Code Entitled Temporary and Substitute Licenses.

#16 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-24-09 of the Ohio Administrative Code Entitled Performance-Based Licensure for Administrators.

Bills Introduced

HCR10 (Adams) Career Technical Education and Skilled Workforce Development: Designate March 2013 as Career-Technical Education and Skilled Workforce Development Month.

FYI ARTS

Embracing Community Change Through the Arts: The Ohio Arts Council, in partnership with the Indiana Arts Commission, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, and the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, will present a tri-state colloquium “Embracing Community Change through the Arts,” April 18 and 19, 2013.

This two-day colloquium will feature sessions with fifteen nationally-recognized presenters – including a keynote address from Eduardo Diaz, director of the Smithsonian Latino Center – exploring how arts organizations can broaden their reach and include all community facets to advance initiatives.

The complete press release is available.

For more information, please contact Elizabeth Weinstein at elizabeth.weinstein@oac.state.oh.us or 614/728-4463.

Register Now for National Arts Advocacy Day: Americans for the Arts is hosting National Arts Advocacy Day on April 8 & 9, 2013 at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park, 2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20008.

National Arts Advocacy Day is being held during a critical time when the federal spending debate threaten support for the arts and arts education. Because of the sequester’s across-the-board cuts, the National Endowment for the Arts, public broadcasting, and arts education are among the many federal agencies having to make mid-year cuts, which will impact thousands of arts organizations nationwide. As Congress and the administration grapple with ever-changing policy proposals, it is imperative that arts advocates come to Capitol Hill to make sure the arts are represented.

More information about National Arts Advocacy Day is available.

The website also include a quick video about arts education.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, The John F. Kennedy Center, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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