Arts On Line Update 12.17.2012

Dear Friends:

Our hearts and prayers unite with colleagues across the world as we join together to honor the lives of the heroic staff at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. We grieve the loss, the loss of educators, the loss of children and innocence. We give thanks for those who came to the rescue. We pray for release from what their eyes saw and their minds will never forget. We will review and practice safety drills, we will worry more than we did last week. We will try to answer questions, including our own, with limited success.

As the children enter your classroom this week, as you visit with colleagues, as you celebrate the holidays, let us remember that no matter our geographic location, our beliefs, our ideals, that we are a community of goodness. That our gifts through the arts can help the healing process, let us communicate in ways that our own words might sometimes fail us, let us move in ways that release the pain, let the sound of music fill our broken hearts.

Thinking of you,
Donna

Donna S. Collins
Executive Director

129th Ohio General Assembly: The Ohio House and Senate completed work on pending legislation last week and are not expected to meet again this session, which ends on December 31, 2012.

The Ohio Senate approved SJR 5 (LaRose and Sawyer) Redistricting/Reapportionment and HB543 (Anielski) Suicide Awareness. The Ohio House concurred with Senate amendments to Sub. HB280 National Guard Scholarship Program (Dovilla and Wachtmann) and Am. Sub. HB555 (Stebelton and Butler) Accountability/Schools/Districts Ratings.

SJR 5 is a proposed constitutional amendment to change redistricting and reapportionment in Ohio introduced in the Senate on December 11, 2012. The constitutional amendment would create a seven member redistricting commission similar to the current Apportionment Board, to develop a redistricting plan for the state. The commission would include the governor, auditor, secretary of state, and one appointee from the leader of each caucus in the House and Senate. Five votes, including at least one vote from the minority party’s representative on the commission, would be required to approve a redistricting plan. The commission must consider compactness and contiguity of voting districts, avoid splitting political subdivisions, and preserve communities of interest when developing the plan. The constitutional amendment requires that the public hearings on the proposed plan be broadcast. No action is expected on this resolution in the Ohio House this session, but it is expected to be introduced again in the 130th General Assembly.

Lawmakers also acknowledged the impact of the Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program on school district budgets by adding to HB280 (Dovilla, Wachtmann) the Ohio National Guard Scholarship Program and the Ohio War Orphans Scholarship Program, an amendment that offsets the cost of the voucher program for certain school districts. The amendment requires the Ohio Department of Education to reimburse school districts for those students who have never attended public school in Ohio, but are now participating in the Jon Peterson Scholarship Program. The funds, up to $3.2 million, will come from the Lottery Profits Education Fund. The amendment was added by the Senate, and concurred with by the Ohio House on December 13, 2012.

Ohio News

Election News: Representative Al Landis (R-Dover) was declared the winner in the 98th House District race defeating former Representative Joshua O’Farrell (D- New Philadelphia) by eight votes. The Tuscarawas County Board of Elections announced the certified results after a recount on December 13, 2012. According to the Dover-New Philadelphia Times Reporter, former Representative Josh O’Farrell will continue to contest the results, which give the Republicans a super majority of 60 Republicans to 39 Democrats in the Ohio House. (O’Farrell, Democrats to fight GOP supermajority by Jon Baker, December 15, 2012, TimesReporter.com)

Quinnipiac Poll on School Funding: The results of a recent Quinnipiac University survey of Ohioans found that 51 percent of respondents believe that in order to do a better job, public schools in Ohio need to spend the money they receive from the government differently, while 37 percent believe that public schools need to receive more money from government. Respondents were asked: “ When it comes to public schools in Ohio, which best represents your view: A) In order to do a better job, public schools in Ohio need to receive more money from government B) In order to do a better job, public schools in Ohio need to spend the money they receive from the government differently?” Details of the survey are available.

Columbus Education Commission Established: Mayor Michael Coleman and Council President Andrew Ginther met with members of a new commission on December 12, 2012 to begin discussions about the future of education in Columbus. The Mayor charged the commission to develop recommendations that,

  • Enable all children to succeed in the city’s vibrant, growing economy
  • Make Columbus a global leader in developing the highly skilled, creative, entrepreneurial workforce that will propel economic growth in the 21st Century, and
  • Leverage the resourcefulness of the entire community to meet these goals.

The commission, appointed by Mayor Coleman, is co-chaired by George Barrett, president and CEO of Cardinal Health, Judge Algenon Marbley, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, and Kathy Ransier, partner for Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease.

Other members of the 25-member commission include

  • E. Gordon Gee, Ohio State University President
  • Carol Perkins, President of the Columbus Board of Education
  • David Harrison, President of Columbus State Community College
  • Dr. Abdinur Mohamud, Ohio Department of Education
  • Alex Fischer, President and CEO of the Columbus Partnership
  • Lolita Augenstein, Columbus Council of PTAs
  • Lois Carson, Columbus Schools Employee Association
  • Robert Chilton, Impact Community Action
  • Tanny Crane, The Crane Group
  • Rev. Otha Gilyard, Shiloh Baptist Church
  • Stephanie Hightower, Columbus Urban League
  • Mary Jo Hudson, Bailey Cavalieri
  • Janet Jackson, United Way of Central Ohio
  • Chad Jester, Nationwide Insurance
  • Rhonda Johnson, Columbus Education Association
  • Mary Lou Langenhop, Children’s Hunger Alliance
  • Pat Losinski, Columbus Metropolitan Library
  • Elizabeth Martinez, Big Brothers and Big Sisters
  • Jordan Miller, Fifth Third Bank
  • Nancy Michong Pyon, Korean American Society of Central Ohio
  • Chip Spinning, Franklin County Children’s Services
  • Priscilla Tyson, Columbus City Council

Information is available.

State Board of Education: The State Board of Education, Debe Terhar president, met on December 10 and 11, 2012 at the Ohio School for the Deaf in Columbus.

Monday, December 10, 2012 Meeting

Draft Restraint and Seclusion Policy Rules 3301-35-15
Senior Executive Director Sasheen Phillips of ODE’s Center of Curriculum and Assessment and Sue Zake, Director of the Office of Exceptional Children, presented an update to the Achievement Committee and the State Board regarding a draft policy and rule language of the proposed new Restraint and Seclusion Policy.

The rules are being developed in accordance with the Governor’s Executive Order 2009-13S, the State of Ohio Policy on Restraint and Seclusion Practices dated May 17, 2010, and in accordance with guidance from the United States Department of Education.

An external committee of stakeholders has been working with the ODE to develop the policy and rules, which were posted on the ODE web site in October 2012 for comment. In addition to the stakeholder group, there have been extensive meetings with other education organizations, other state agencies and partners about the proposed policy and rules.

The purpose of the proposed policy is to “create a learning environment that promotes the use of evidence-based behavioral interventions, thus enhancing academic and social behavioral outcomes for all students.”

The following are the key components of the draft policy and rule as presented:

  • Creates a statewide policy regarding seclusion and restraint that applies to all school districts
  • Addresses the use of a non-aversive effective behavior system based on multi-tiered systems of supports through positive behavior intervention support (PBIS)
  • Prohibits the use of restraint and seclusion in behavior management, including “mechanical” restraints, corporal punishment, prone restraints, etc.
  • Restricts the use of restraint and seclusion unless there is an immediate threat of physical harm to students and others. “Physical restraint may be used only when there is an immediate risk of physical harm to the student or others and no other safe and effective intervention is possible, and only in a manner that is age and developmentally appropriate.”
  • Requires documentation and reporting of incidents of restraint and seclusion. A report on restraint and/or seclusion must be forwarded to parents within 24 hours of any incident.
  • Provides guidance for training. The ODE is preparing guidance for training of staff, because at this time the ODE does not have funding to provide training.

According to the presentation, the external stakeholder committee has received 293 online comments, 53 form letters, and other letters regarding the draft policy and rules, and is now focusing its work on addressing the following areas: the definition of seclusion; permissible and restrictive practices; training, supports, and costs; the complaint and whistle-blower language; data collection and reporting; and the tiered system for training and prevention.

The ODE continues to work with stakeholders and cross-agency partners on the following issues:

  • What needs to be reported and to whom? What kind of supports will schools/districts need? ODE has been working with EMIS about the reporting of incidents at the district, building, and state levels and what kind of supports will be needed.
  • How will compliance with the rules be ensured? What will be the whistle-blower language? The reporting requirements of incidents involving children in the draft policy do not change other reporting requirements in law to Children’s Service agencies, law enforcement agencies, or the Office of Professional Conduct.
  • What are the communication and outreach plans for school districts/schools?
  • What kind of supports, training, and guidance are needed, and what are the costs?

The ODE is developing a training guidance chart for the field; will host in January meetings with education organizations to present the policy and rules and discuss the impact of the policy and rules; and is considering language for functional behavioral assessment, and what that means beyond the use of it in IDEA and with a broader range of students.

To establish a statewide baseline, the ODE will survey in December 2012 local districts, county boards of Developmental Disability, and ESCs about the use of PBIS, crisis management, and restraint and seclusion.

In response to the presentation State Board members asked for clarification of some definitions and terms in the policy, and asked for more information about the cost to implement the policy (will additional staff be needed?) and the cost for training staff.

An intent resolution will be brought forward in January 2013 for the Achievement Committee and the State Board to consider.

Committee Reports:

The Achievement Committee, chaired by Angela Thai Bennett, discussed three items:

  • The committee discussed changes to the draft Restraint and Seclusion Policy and Rules
  • The committee also received a presentation regarding proposed amendments to Rules 3301-51-01 to -09 and -11, Operating Standards for Children with Disabilities. The rules are being updated pursuant to five-year review requirement. The State Board of Education will consider a resolution of intent to adopt the amended rules at the March 2013 meeting.
  • The committee reviewed the draft Financial Literacy Standards for primary and middle grades. The standards align to the financial literacy standards for high schools adopted by the Board in June 2012. The draft standards have been posted on the ODE website for feedback.

The Capacity Committee, chaired by Tom Gunlock, discussed the following items:

  • The committee voted to move Rule 3301-24-08, Professional and Associate License Renewal to the State Board, which will consider an intent to adopt resolution in January 2013. The rule is being amended to align with HB153 FY2012-13 budget bill, and eliminates the requirement that teachers with career-technical licenses complete a degree in order to renew their license.
  • The Committee requested that ODE staff bring the proposed Rules 3301-24-19 to -22, Alternative Resident Educator License Rules, back in January 2013 with more information about how the rules relate to the requirements for teachers under the Third Grade Reading Guarantee.
  • As proposed the rules expand from grades 4-12 to grades K-12 the designated subject alternative license, which makes it valid for teaching a single subject in grades K-12; add the option for teachers to complete a summer training institute approved by the Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents to meet the pre-service teacher training requirement for alternative licensure; add the option for teachers to complete a professional development program approved by the Chancellor in place of 12 additional semester hours of professional education college coursework in the principles and practices of teaching; and remove the requirement for applicants for alternative licensure to have completed a major in the subject area to be taught, and instead specifying a particular number of hours.
  • The Committee voted to recommend to the full State Board the approval of Craig Burford to serve as the third member of the panel of experts to evaluate the teacher licensure standards of identified states pursuant to ORC 3319.228.
  • William Gorth of the Evaluation Systems Group of Pearson presented to the committee information about the transition to new licensure assessments provided by Pearson, which are to be administered to Ohio licensure candidates beginning in September 2013.

The Committee on Urban Education, chaired by Joe Farmer, approved documents presented by the ODE staff related to single-gender schools after discussion and revisions, and discussed principles that support student achievement in high poverty schools identified in the report Failure Is Not an Option.

The Legislative and Budget Committee, chaired by C. Todd Jones, discussed the federal sequestration process and its impact on Ohio’s schools, and received an update on HB555 (Stebelton) Accountability System for Districts/Schools.

Meeting on December 11, 2012

Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction
Acting Superintendent Michael Sawyers updated the Ohio Department of Education on a number of topics. The first part of his presentation included information on the following items:

  • Dr. John Richard the current superintendent of the Perry Local School District (Stark County) has been appointed to the position of Senior Executive Director at the ODE. He will start at the ODE in February 2013 and will oversee accountability and improvement.
  • Auditor of State David Yost has informed the ODE that his office will release a data integrity report about the investigation of student attendance data irregularities in January 2013. The report is likely to be released at the January meeting of the State Board of Education. The report will include the findings of the auditor’s investigation and recommendations. The ODE is preparing to respond to the report and will release the complete local report cards as soon as possible after the release of the report. According to Acting Superintendent Sawyers it will take 7-14 days to produce the report cards.
  • The ODE has prepared a video to help parents and communities understand the implementation of the Third Grade Guarantee. The ODE is also producing other videos for parents and communities, and the next video available will be about the Common Core Standards.

Acting Superintendent Sawyers spent more time with the State Board discussing a report released by the U.S. Department of Education on November 26, 2012 with preliminary data on the four-year high school graduation rates for the 2010-11 school year. The new method to calculate the graduation rate tracks individual students who start as first-time 9th graders and graduate with a standard diploma within four years. The October 2008 federal Title I regulations require each state to establish a single graduation rate goal and annual targets that reflect improvement from the prior year. Approved goals and targets for each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are included in each state’s approved Accountability Workbook or in the state’s approved ESEA flexibility request.

According to the preliminary data released, the graduation rate in Ohio was 80 percent overall. Ohio students posted a 59 percent graduation rate for African American students; 53 percent rate for students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP); and a 65 percent rate for students from economically disadvantaged families. Ohio’s goal is to reach a 90 percent graduation rate by 2019 through incremental increases.

Acting Superintendent Sawyers emphasized the need to motivate and create an urgency in the state and in the schools to ensure that all students graduate in four years. Implementation of the Common Core standards, new rigorous assessments, and the more rigorous graduation requirements will raise the bar for students and schools even higher. Ohio’s schools must be better prepared in the next few years to meet the higher standards and challenges. Ohio’s schools, leaders, and policy-makers must not be pressured, like in the past, to lower the bar because it is difficult.

Superintendent Sawyers also reminded the State Board about the “Are You Ready?” campaign that was launched last year to inform schools and communities about the higher standards that are going to required by 2014-15. This year the campaign has been delayed because of the late release of the report card data, but Acting Superintendent Sawyers intends to reach-out to all districts over the next months to encourage them to take action to better prepare students to meet the higher standards.

Ohio Assessments for Educators: The State Board of Education also received a presentation from Dr. Bill Gorth and Donna Hanby from Evaluation Systems (Pearsons), which will implement new assessments for Ohio teachers starting in September 2013. The new assessments, referred to as Ohio Assessments for Educators, will replace the Praxis exams, published by Education Testing Services.

According to the presentation, Ohio’s new teacher assessment program will be developed with Ohio educators. Each of the 46 specific tests areas will be developed by an advisory committee of classroom teachers and college faculty. The committees will identify what is to be tested, and, after developed, will review the assessments for content accuracy and content bias. A larger group of teachers will then be surveyed to ensure that the appropriate content is being assessed. After the assessments are developed, the State Board will set the passing scores for the new assessments in June 2012. The assessments will be administered by computer, throughout the year, in multiple sites across the state.

To communicate the new assessment program Evaluation Systems will create a web site that will include information about Ohio policies and regulations for teaching. The web site will have registration and program preparation information, and candidates will be able to have preliminary results immediately. The results will be generated in reports for the ODE, other Ohio agencies, teacher preparation programs, and the U.S. DOE.

Board President Debe Terhar and Acting Superintendent Michael Sawyers also proposed that the State Board of Education consider moving its meetings to the conference center at the Ohio Department of Education, 25 Front Street in Columbus. The conference center is being renovated and will be able to seat 75 persons. The renovations should be complete in February 2013. The State Board discussed setting their March 2013 meeting at the new conference center.

The following is a summary of the resolutions that the State Board of Education considered at their December 11, 2012 meeting:

#3 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-4-01 of Administrative Code entitled “Notice of Meetings”.

#4 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-23-44 of the Administrative Code entitled “Temporary and Substitute Licenses.”

#5 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-24-09 of the Administrative Code entitled “Performance-Based Licensure for Administrators.”

#6 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Consider Confirmation of the Rocky River City School District’s determination of impractical the transportation of certain students attending St. Bernadette Elementary School, Westlake, OH.

#7 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Consider Confirmation of the Rocky River City School District’s determination of impractical the transportation of certain students attending St. Paul Lutheran School, Westlake, OH.

#8 Approved. Resolution of Intent to Consider Confirmation of the Rocky River City School District’s determination of impractical the transportation of certain students attending St. Raphael Elementary School, Bay Village, OH.

#9 Approved. Resolution to Confirm and Approve the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Approve the Transfer of school district territory from the Toledo City School District, Lucas County to the Ottawa Hills Local School District, Lucas County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#18 Approved. Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-24-01 of the Administrative Code entitled “Glossary/Definitions.”

#19 Approved. Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-24-05 of the Administrative Code entitled “Licensure.”

#20 Approved. Resolution of Appointment of Venezuela Robinson to the Educator Standards Board.

#21 Approved. Resolution to Adopt Standards for Determining Annual Operating Expenditures Pursuant to ORC 3302.20.

#22 Approved. Resolution to Approve a Third Member of the Panel of Experts to Evaluate the Teacher Licensure Standards of Identified States Pursuant to ORC 3319.228. The Committee voted to recommend to the full State Board the approval of Craig Burford to serve as the third member of the panel of experts.

#23 Approved. Resolution to Adopt Standards Allowing the State Superintendent of Public Instruction to Grant Waivers of the Operating Standards for Schools in Accordance With R.C. 3301.07 (O).

#24 Approved. Emergency Resolution to Delegate the Acting Superintendent of Public Instruction to Engage a Hearing Examiner to Act as the State Board of Education’s Designee to Conduct a Hearing Pursuant to ORC 3314.074.

#25 Presented a Certificate of Commendation to Kristen McKinley for her service on the State Board of Education.

HB555 (Stebelton/Butler) Accountability/School/District Ratings: The Ohio Senate completed work on Am. Sub. HB555 on December 12, 2012 after making several changes in the bill, and approved the bill by a vote of 27 to 6. Some of the changes made in the Senate Education Committee were removed when the bill came to a vote in the Senate to avoid a conference committee in the Ohio House. This strategy worked, because the Ohio House concurred with the Senate changes on December 13, 2012 by a vote of 56 to 31. The bill now awaits the governor’s signature.

Work on HB555 began last spring when lawmakers debated SB316 (Lehner), the mid-biennial review for education. A new A-F report card rating system for schools/districts was originally included in SB316 to comply with Ohio’s application for waivers from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Lawmakers decided to hold-back on the changes in Ohio’s rating system for schools and pulled them from SB316 before it was approved and signed into law in June 2012. But, as a result, lawmakers were still required to return to the drawing board and finalized a new rating system for Ohio’s schools/districts in order to comply with the federal waiver Ohio was subsequently granted.

HB555 includes a variety of changes in education law, but primarily does the following:

  • Creates a new academic performance rating system for public schools
  • Requires an alternative rating system for community schools with dropout prevention and recovery programs
  • Creates a new evaluation process for community school sponsors
  • Abolishes the Ohio Accountability Task Force
  • Makes changes in the third grade reading guarantee and the requirements for qualified reading teachers
  • Modifies the procedure for approving the opening of new Internet- or computer-based community schools
  • Makes changes in the War Orphans Scholarship and Ohio National Guard Scholarship programs

The act also includes a new section 3302.034 Additional Measures, which is of interest to arts education advocates. This new section of law requires the State Board of Education to adopt measures in addition to the report card, and report them separately for school districts, buildings, community schools, STEM schools, and college preparatory boarding schools. The new measures include the availability of courses in the fine arts and the amount of extracurricular services offered to students. The ODE is required to report this information annually beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, and make this information available on its web site for comparison purposes.

The act directs the State Board of Education, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Ohio Department of Education to calculate standards, benchmarks, and approve rules to implement the provisions in the act in a very short amount of time. Some lawmakers and school leaders are questioning the capacity of the ODE to complete this work after years of cut-backs and loss of staff.

The following is a summary of some of the provisions included in the act as passed by the Senate and concurred with by the House:

Amended Section 3301.079 (D) Academic Standards
Replaces references to “English language arts” with the terms reading and writing.

Amended Sec. 3301.0710 (A)(2) Assessments
Increases the number of statewide assessments in the forth grade to three: English language arts, mathematics, and social studies.

Decreases the number of statewide assessments in the fifth grade to three: English language arts, mathematics, and science.

Increases the number of statewide assessments in the sixth grade to three: English language arts, mathematics, and social studies.

Decreases the number of statewide assessments in the eighth grade to three: English language arts, mathematics, and science.

Increases the number of ranges of scores students can achieve on the achievement assessments from three to five: advanced level; accelerated; proficient; basic; and limited.

Amended Sec. 3301.0711 Graduation Requirements
Technical changes. Removes terms that are being phased-out.

Amended Sec. 3301.0714 EMIS
Allows entities contracted by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to “develop” state assessments to access certain EMIS reports with staff and/or student information.

Amended Sec. 3301.0715 Diagnostic Assessments
Requires students in the third grade to take a diagnostic assessment. Allows districts that received an excellent or effective rating to use an assessment other than the one determined by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE).

Amended Sec. 3302.01 Report Card Ratings Definitions
Performance Index Score: Allows the ODE to assign an additional weight to students who have passed over a grade or subject and have attained a proficient score or higher on a state assessment. The ODE shall assign each year an additional proportional weight to students who attain an advanced score. For each school year that such a student’s score is included in the performance index score and the student attains the proficient score on an assessment, that additional weight shall be assigned to the student on a subject-by-subject basis. The State Board must approve this weight.

Subsets of Students: Adds students identified as gifted and students in the lowest quintile for achievement to the subset of students included in the performance index score. Students identified as gifted in superior cognitive will be included in the subset, along with students identified as gifted in reading and math. The ODE shall also include data for students with specific academic ability in other fields, if the field is assessed.

Value Added progress dimension: Requires the “value-added progress dimension” be developed and implemented in accordance with section 3302.021 of the Revised Code.

Graduation Rate: Includes the definition of the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate and the five-year adjusted cohort.

Annual Measurable Objectives: Defines annual measurable objectives as the progress determined in accordance with an agreement between the ODE and the U.S. Department of Education.

Amended Sec. 3302.02, Performance Indicators
Requires the State Board to establish a “set” of performance indicators “that considered as a unit will be used as one of the performance categories for the report cards.”

Removes attendance from the set of performance indicators that the State Board of Education is required to establish, but retains the “breadth of coursework available within the district.”

Adds to the performance indicators for gifted education in the 2014-2015 school year the performance of students identified as gifted on state assessments and value added growth measure dis-aggregated for students identified as gifted.

Directs the State Board to set the percentage at 80 percent for all of the state achievement assessments for the 2013-2014 school year and 85 percent for 11th grade students. Permits the State Board to adopt rules by July 1, 2014, establishing a different percentage to begin with the 2014-2015 school year.

Amended Sec. 3302.021 Value Added
Eliminates the Ohio Accountability Task Force and the Ohio Accountability Advisory Committee, which was included in the House version of the bill.

Amended Sec. 3302.03 Report Cards
Eliminates the current report card criteria.

States that annually, not later than the fifteenth day of September or the preceding Friday when that day falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the ODE shall issue annual report cards for each school district and building.

Establishes a new system for rating school districts and buildings based on letter grades A-F outlined in division (E) of this section. The State Board of Education is required to establish the performance criteria for each letter grade and prescribe a method to assign a letter grade. The bill states in division (E) that “A” means making excellent progress; “B” means making above average progress; “C” means making average progress; “D” means making below average progress; “F” means failing to meet minimum progress. The current requirement in law to disaggregate the data according to certain categories is retained with some changes for gifted education, and added is a new category comprised of students who achieve in the lowest quintile.

States that for a school building to which any of the performance measures do not apply, due to grade levels served by the building, the State Board shall designate the performance measures that are applicable to the building. This designation must be calculated separately and used to calculate the building’s overall grade.

Requires the ODE to issue annual report cards reflecting the performance profile of each school district, each building within each district, and for the state as a whole, using the performance measures and letter grade system. Requires the ODE to include on the report card for each district the most recent two-year trend data in student achievement for each subject and each grade.

Outlines in Section 3302.03 (A)(1) a-f; (B)(1) a-g; and (C)(1) a-n how grades in the performance measures for school districts and schools will be phased-in over school years 2012-13; 2013-14; and 2014-15. For some school years the percentage of students needed to receive a certain grade level changes, and indicators are added. States that there shall not be an overall letter grade for school districts or buildings for the 2012-13 or 2013-14 school years.

The following performance measures will be reported and graded starting in the 2012-13 school year:

  • Annual measurable objectives, which replaces adequate yearly progress.
  • Performance index score for a school district or building as a percentage of the total possible points as adopted by the State Board.
  • Performance Indicators earned expressed as a percent.
  • Four and five-year adjusted cohort graduation rates overall.
  • Value added score based on three years of value added data.
  • The value-added progress dimension score for a school district or building disaggregated for each of the following subgroups: students with disabilities and students whose performance places them in the lowest quintile for achievement on a statewide basis. Each subgroup shall be a separate graded measure. The Senate removed students who are gifted from this provision in 2012-13 school year, but added students identified as gifted in superior cognitive ability and specific academic ability fields starting in the 2013-14 school year.

The following additional performance measure will be reported and graded starting in the 2013-14 school year:

  • The progress school districts and schools are making in improving literacy in grades kindergarten through three, as determined using a method prescribed by the state board. The state board shall adopt rules to prescribe benchmarks and standards for assigning grades to districts and buildings. In adopting benchmarks for assigning letter grades the state board shall determine progress made based on the reduction in the percentage of students scoring below grade level, or below proficient, compared from year to year on the English language arts diagnostic assessments and the third grade English language arts assessment as applicable. The state board shall designate for a “C” grade a value that is not lower than the statewide average value for this measure. No grade shall be issued for a district or building in which less than five per cent of students have scored below grade level on the diagnostic assessment administered to students in kindergarten.
  • Beginning in the 2013-14 school year the following indicators will be reported, but not graded pursuant to (B)(2) a-f of this section. Not later than December 31, 2013, the state board shall adopt rules that prescribe the methods by which the performance measures for value added and improving literacy in grades K-3 will be assessed and assigned a letter grade, including performance benchmarks for each grade.
  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building participating in advanced placement classes and the percentage of those students who received a score of three or better on advanced placement examinations.
  • The number of a district’s or building’s students who have earned at least three college credits through dual enrollment programs, such as the post-secondary enrollment options program and state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation, that appear on a student’s transcript or other official document, either of which is issued by the institution of higher education from which the student earned the college credit. The credits earned shall not include any that are remedial or developmental and shall include those that count toward the curriculum requirements established for completion of a degree.
  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building who have taken a national standardized test used for college admission determinations and the percentage of those students who are determined to be remediation-free.
  • The percentage of the district’s or the building’s students who receive industry credentials. The state board shall adopt criteria for acceptable industry credentials.
  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building who are participating in an international baccalaureate program and the percentage of those students who receive a score of four or better on the international baccalaureate examinations.
  • The percentage of the district’s or building’s students who receive an honors diploma.

The following additional performance measures will be reported and graded starting in the 2014-15 school year:

  • The overall score under the value-added progress dimension, or another measure of student academic progress if adopted by the state board, of a school district or building, for which the department shall use up to three years of value-added data as available. The state board shall prohibit the assigning of a grade of “A” for this measure unless the district’s or building’s grade assigned for value-added progress dimension for all subgroups is a “B” or higher. The state board may adopt a student academic progress measure to be used instead of the value-added progress dimension. If the state board adopts such a measure, it also shall prescribe a method for assigning letter grades for the new measure that are comparable with other provisions in the act.

The following performance indicators will be included on the report card without a grade in the 2014-15 school year:

  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building who have taken a national standardized test used for college admission determinations and the percentage of those students who are determined to be remediation-free in accordance with the standards adopted under division (F) of section 3345.061 of the Revised Code;
  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building participating in advanced placement classes and the percentage of those students who received a score of three or better on advanced placement examinations;
  • The number of a district’s or building’s students who have earned at least three college credits through dual enrollment programs, such as the post-secondary enrollment options program and state-approved career-technical courses offered through dual enrollment or statewide articulation, that appear on a student’s transcript or other official document, either of which is issued by the institution of higher education from which the student earned the college credit. The credits earned that are reported in this section shall not include any that are remedial or developmental and shall include those that count toward the curriculum requirements established for completion of a degree.
  • The percentage of the district’s or building’s students who receive an honor’s diploma.
  • The percentage of the district’s or building’s students who receive industry credentials
  • The percentage of students enrolled in a district or building who are participating in an international baccalaureate program and the percentage of those students who receive a score of four or better on the international baccalaureate examinations;
  • The results of the college and career-ready assessments.

Sets the deadlines for the State Board of Education to adopt resolutions describing the performance measures, benchmarks, and grading system for the 2012-13; 2013-14 and the 2014-15 school years.

Does not require an overall letter grade for a school district or school in the 2012-2013 or the 2013-2014 school years, but requires the ODE to establish a method to assign an overall grade for a school district or school building for the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter. The State Board shall adopt a grade for each separate component and an overall grade for the following:

(a) Gap closing, which shall include the performance measure for annual measurable objectives
(b) Achievement, which shall include the performance measures for the performance index score and performance indicators
(c) Progress, which shall include the performance measures, value added, and the rate of participation and scores on a national standardized test for college admission
(d) Graduation rates
(e) Kindergarten through third-grade literacy
(f) Prepared for success, which shall include the performance measures for participation and scores on a national standardized test for college admission, indicators for college and career ready, participation and scores on advanced placement exams, college credits earned, honors diploma, results of the college and career-ready assessments, and industry credentials.

States further that when determining the overall grade for the prepared for success component, no individual student shall be counted in more than one performance measure. However, if a student qualifies for more than one performance measure in the component, the state board may, in its method to determine a grade for the component, specify an additional weight for such a student that is not greater than or equal to 1.0. In determining the overall score the state board shall ensure that the pool of students included in the performance measures aggregated under that division are all of the students included in the four- and five-year adjusted graduation cohort.

Requires the ODE to conduct a public presentation before the House and Senate education committees at least forty-five days prior to the State Board’s adoption of rules to prescribe the methods for calculating the grades for the individual components and the overall grade for the report card and describe the format for the report card, the weights that will be assigned to the components of the overall grade, and the method for calculating the overall grade.

Requires the State Board not later than July 1, 2015 to develop a measure of student academic progress for high school students, which shall be included on the report card beginning in the 2015-2016.

Requires the ODE to report when a particular student group did not receive a student performance data report, because there were less than ten students.

Amended Sec. 3302.033 Report Cards for Joint Vocational School Districts and Career Technical Planning Districts.
Allows data to be dis-aggregated for each joint vocational school district. Includes districts that are not joint vocational.

NEW Section 3302.034 Additional Measures
Requires the State Board of Education by December 31, 2013 to adopt measures in addition to the report card, and report them separately for school districts, school buildings, community schools, STEM schools, and college preparatory boarding schools.

  • Data for students who have passed over a grade or subject area under an acceleration policy prescribed under section 3324.10 of the Revised Code
  • The number of students who are eligible to receive and those that are receiving free lunch under the “National School Lunch Act,” 42 U.S.C. 1751, as amended, and the “Child Nutrition Act of 1966,” 42 U.S.C. 1771, as amended
  • The number of lead teachers employed by each district and each building once the data is available through the education management information system established under section 3301.0714
  • The amount of students screened and identified as gifted under Chapter 3324. of the Revised Code
  • Postgraduate student outcome data as described under division (E)(2)(d)(ii) of section 3314.017 of the Revised Code
  • Availability of courses in fine arts
  • Participation with other school districts to provide career-technical education services to students
  • The amount of extracurricular services offered to students.

The department shall report this information annually beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and make this information available on its web site for comparison purposes.

Amended Section 3302.04 Transition for Designations
Clarifies that after the 2014-2015 school year, when a provision in law refers to a school or school district in academic emergency, academic watch, continuous improvement, it means the following: Academic emergency = F, Academic Watch = D, Continuous Improvement = C.

Maintains current agreements with the U.S. Department of Education regarding low performing schools.

States that for the 2012-2013 school year schools or districts that receive an “F” rating for the number of performance indicators met; performance index score; or a rating of “D” or “F” for value added, shall be subject to intervention rules and a site evaluation.

Amended Sec. 3302.041 Corrective Action Plans
Clarifies that corrective action plans for schools are contingent upon the approval of the U.S. Department of Education.

The Senate Removed Changes to Amended Sec. 3302.042 Parent Trigger Pilot Project

Amended Sec. 3302.05 Exemptions from Mandates
Identifies the school districts eligible for exemptions from state mandates adopted by the State Board of Education based on the new rating system for schools.

Amended Sec. 3302.10 Academic distress commission
Identifies the school districts that must implement an academic distress commission based on the new rating system.

Amended Sec. 3302.12 Low Performing Schools
Identifies the school districts that must implement certain provisions regarding low performing schools based on the new rating system.

Amended Sec. 3302.20 Annual Operating Expenditures for Classroom Instruction
Removed the House requirement that data to be collected and reported from the college preparatory boarding school after two years of operations about operating expenditures for classroom instruction and non classroom purposes.

Excludes community schools subject to Section 3314.17 (dropout prevention and recovery schools) from performance index scores rankings.

Amended Sec. 3302.21 Ranking City, Exempted Village, Local School Districts, and Community Schools
States that community schools subject to Section 3314.17 (dropout prevention and recovery schools) and STEM schools subject to Section 3326 are excluded from rankings.

Permits the Superintendent of Public Instruction to develop another measure of student academic performance based on similar data and performance measures and to rank districts, schools, or buildings to which the performance index score does not apply.

Allows alternative student academic progress measures to be used to rank schools if adopted under division (C)(1)(e) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code.

Excludes from an annual report about school rankings issued by the ODE each September community schools subject to 3314.17; and STEM schools subject to 3326.

Amended Section 3310.03 Educational Choice Scholarship
Aligns the eligibility requirements for students seeking an Educational Choice Scholarship with the new rating/accountability system for schools/districts.

A student shall not be eligible for a scholarship if the student’s resident building meets any of the following in the most recent rating under section 3302.03 of the Revised Code published prior to the first day of July of the school year for which a scholarship is sought:

  • The building has an overall designation of excellent or effective under section 3302.03 of the Revised Code as it existed prior to the effective date of this amendment.
  • For the 2012-2013 or 2013-2014 school year or both, the building has a grade of “A” or “B” for the performance index score and for the value-added progress dimension; or if the building serves only grades ten through twelve, the building received a grade of “A” or “B” for the performance index score and had a four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate of greater than or equal to seventy-five per cent.
  • For the 2014-2015 school year or any school year thereafter, the building has a grade of “A” or “B” and a grade of “A” for the value-added progress dimension; or if the building serves only grades ten through twelve, the building received a grade of “A” or “B” for the performance index score and had a four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate of greater than or equal to seventy-five per cent.
  • A student who is eligible for kindergarten shall not be eligible for a scholarship if the student’s resident district meets any of the following in the most recent rating under section 3302.03 of the Revised Code published prior to the first day of July of the school year for which a scholarship is sought:
  • The district has an overall designation of excellent or effective under section 3302.03 of the Revised Code as it existed prior to the effective date of this amendment.
  • The district has a grade of “A” or “B” for the performance index score and for the value-added progress dimension for the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years.
  • The district has an overall grade of “A” or “B” and a grade of “A” for the value-added progress dimension for the 2014-2015 school year or any school year thereafter.

Amended Section 3310.06 Educational Choice Scholarship
Eliminates the terms academic emergency or academic watch and replaces them with “persistently low-performing school buildings” in the description of the intent of the Educational Choice Scholarship.

New 3310.16 Two Application Periods for the Educational Choice Scholarship
Establishes for the 2014-2015 school year and thereafter two application periods, the first day of February to July 1st and July 1st through mid August, for the Educational Choice Scholarship.

Amended Sec. 3311.80 Municipal School District
Permits the municipal school district to use an alternative student academic progress measure adopted by the State Board of Education in place of value added as a component of teacher evaluation.

States that “Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Chapter 4117. of the Revised Code, the requirements of this section prevail over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after October 1, 2012.”

Amended Sec. 3313.473 Site-based management councils
Aligns the requirements for a site-based management council with the new rating system for school districts and schools.

Amended Sec. 3313.608 Third Grade Reading Guarantee/Teacher Qualifications
Changes the term English language arts to reading and writing.

Requires students identified with a reading deficiency to receive intensive reading instruction services and regular diagnostic assessments until the development of the reading improvement and monitoring plan is implemented. Students are to receive not less than 90 minutes of reading instruction per day.

Includes in division (H) the qualifications of a teacher to provide the reading instruction. States that prior to July 1, 2014, each eligible student who enters third grade for the first time on or after July 1, 2013, shall be assigned a teacher who satisfies one or more of the following criteria:

  • holds a reading endorsement on the teacher’s license and has attained a passing score on the corresponding assessment for that endorsement
  • has completed a master’s degree program with a major in reading
  • has demonstrated evidence of a credential earned from a list of scientifically research-based reading instruction programs approved by the department
  • was rated “above value added,” which means most effective in reading, as determined by the department, for the last two school years

States that effective July 1, 2014, each eligible student shall be assigned a teacher who satisfies one or more of the following criteria:

  • holds a reading endorsement on the teacher’s license and has attained a passing score on the corresponding assessment for that endorsement.
  • has completed a master’s degree program with a major in reading.
  • was rated “above value added,” which means most effective for the last two school years.
  • has earned a passing score on a rigorous test of principles of scientifically research-based reading instruction. This test shall be selected through a competitive bidding process and shall be approved by the state board.

Also states that, if on the effective date of this amendment, a school district or community school cannot furnish the number of qualified teachers the school district or community school shall develop and submit a plan by June 30, 2013, in a manner determined by the department indicating the criteria that will be used to determine those teachers in the school district or community school who will teach and how the school district or community school will meet the qualifications.

A school district or community school may include in this plan the option to contract with another school district or private provider that has been screened and approved by the department to provide intervention services. If the school district or community school’s plan is not approved by the department by August 15, 2013, the school district or community school shall use a private contractor from a list approved by the department or contract with another district to provide intervention services for these students.

Amended Sec. 3314.011 Fiscal Officers
Requires fiscal officers of community schools to be licensed under Section 3301.074 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 3314.012 Report Cards for Community Schools
Exempts schools subject to Section 3314.017 (dropout and prevention recovery schools) from the ODE requirement to issue annual report cards for community schools.

Requires the report card for community schools to align with divisions (A), (B), (C) and (D) of Section 3302.03 of the Revised Code, rating system for schools.

Amended Sec. 3314.013 Internet or computer-based schools
Extends until the 61st day after the law has been enacted or after July 1, 2013 the prohibition regarding the opening of new internet/computer-based schools, with some exceptions. New schools may open subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Requires the Superintendent to approve applications for new internet/computer-based school from only those demonstrating experience and quality.

Requires the Superintendent to adopt rules prescribing measures to determine experience and quality of applicants. Measures shall include, but are not limited to, the sponsor’s experience, the operator’s experience, the sponsor and operator’s previous record of student achievement, a preference for operators with previous experience in Ohio.

Amended Sec. 3314.015 Community School Sponsors
Requires the ODE to evaluate the effectiveness of any and all sponsors of community schools.

Requires the State Board rather than the ODE to determine whether the mission proposed in the contract of a community school to be sponsored by a state university board of trustees complies with the requirements in the division, and if any tax exempt entity is an education-oriented entity for the purposes of sponsoring a community school.

Amended Sec. 3314.016 Rating Sponsors of Community Schools
Prohibits an entity from sponsoring additional community schools if it is rated as ineffective.

Requires the ODE to develop and implement an evaluation system that rates each entity that sponsors a community school based on the following components:

  • Academic performance of students enrolled
  • Adherence to the quality practices prescribed by the ODE. This provision can not be implemented until the ODE develops the quality practices and an instrument to measure adherence.
  • Compliance with applicable laws and administrative rules by an entity.

Requires the ODE to exclude from the academic component community schools in operation for less than two full years and community schools in division (A)(4)(b) of Sec. 3314.35. (Dropout recovery and prevention)

Requires the ODE to prescribe quality practices for community school sponsors and develop an instrument to measure adherence to the quality practices.

Requires the State Board of education not later than July 1, 2013 to adopt rules in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code prescribing standards for measuring compliance with applicable laws and rules under division (B)(1)(c) of this section.

Requires the ODE to rate all entities that sponsor community schools as either “exemplary,” “effective,” or “ineffective,” based on the components prescribed by division (B) of this section, where each component is weighted equally, except that entities sponsoring community schools for the first time may be assigned the rating of “emerging” for only the first two consecutive years.

Requires the ODE to publish the ratings between the first day of October and the 15th day of October.

States that prior to the 2014-2015 school year, student academic performance prescribed under division (B)(1)(a) of this section shall not include student academic performance data from community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program as described in division (A)(4)(a) of section 3314.35 of the Revised Code.

For the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter, student academic performance prescribed under division (B)(1)(a) of this section shall include student academic performance data from community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program.

Allows the ODE to assume sponsorship of a community school that has not yet opened and for which the sponsor has becomes ineligible until the governing authority of the new community school has secured a new sponsor or until two years has expired. The sponsorship by the ODE of a school under these circumstances does not count toward the ODE sponsor limit.

Amended Sec. 3314.017 Report Cards for Dropout and Prevention Community Schools
Requires the State Board of Education to adopt academic performance rating and a report card system for community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in dropout prevention and recovery programs beginning in the 2012-2013 school year.

States that nothing in this section shall at any time relieve a school from its obligations under the “No Child Left Behind Act of 2001” to make “adequate yearly progress.” The department shall continue to report each school’s performance as required by the act and to enforce applicable sanctions under section 3302.04 or 3302.041 of the Revised Code.

Requires the State Board to adopt the following performance indicators for the rating and report card system required by this section:

  • Graduation rate for students graduating in four years or less; those graduating in five years; those graduating in 6 years, 7 years, and 8 years with a high school diploma.
  • The percentage of twelfth-grade students currently enrolled in the school who have attained the designated passing score on all of the applicable state high school achievement assessments required under division (B)(1) or (2) of section 3301.0710 of the Revised Code and other students enrolled in the school, regardless of grade level, who are within three months of their twenty-second birthday and have attained the designated passing score on all of the applicable state high school achievement assessments by their twenty-second birthday.
  • Annual measurable objectives as defined in section 3302.01 of the Revised Code
  • Growth in student achievement in reading, or mathematics, or both as measured by separate nationally norm-referenced assessments that have developed appropriate standards for students enrolled in dropout prevention and recovery programs, adopted or approved by the state board.

Requires the State Board rules to prescribe the expected performance levels and benchmarks for each of the indicators based on the data gathered by the department. Based on a school’s level of attainment or non attainment of the expected performance levels and benchmarks for each of the indicators, the department shall rate each school in one of the following categories: Exceeds standards, Meets standards, or Does not meet standards.

Requires the State Board to establish performance levels and benchmarks for the indicators by certain dates.

Prescribes the percentage of the score that will determine each indicator.

States that if both of the indicators for graduation rate and student achievement on certain state assessments improve by ten per cent for two consecutive years, a school shall be rated as “meets standards.”

Prescribes the components of the report cards for the 2012-2013; 2013-2014; 2014-2015 school years. Requires the ODE to also include student outcome data such as postsecondary credits earned, nationally recognized career or technical certificates, military enlistment, job placement, attendance rate, and progress on closing achievement gaps for each school.

Requires the ODE to gather data and work with stakeholders to determine how to measure student growth and requires schools to cooperate.

Requires the ODE to identify one or more states that have established or are in the process of establishing similar academic performance rating systems for dropout prevention and recovery programs, and consult with the departments of education of those states in developing the system required by this section.

Amended Sec. 3314.02 Challenged School District
Aligns the definition of a challenged school district with the components of the new rating system. States that a challenged school district is one that:

  • On the effective date of this amendment, the district was in a state of academic emergency or in a state of academic watch as described in law section prior to the effective date of this amendment.
  • For two of the 2012-2013, 2013-2014, and 2014-2015 school years, the district received a grade of “D” or “F” for the performance index score and a grade of “F” for the value-added progress dimension.
  • For the 2015-2016 school year and for any school year thereafter, the district has received an overall grade of “D” or “F”, or, for at least two of the three most recent school years, the district received a grade of “F” for the value-added progress dimension under division (C)(1)(e) of that section.

Allows the governing board of an educational service center to sponsor a new start-up school in any challenged school district in the state if all of the following are satisfied: If applicable, it satisfies the requirements of division (E) of section 3311.86 of the Revised Code; it is approved to do so by the ODE; or it enters into an agreement with the ODE under section 3314.015 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 3314.05 Community School Multiple Facilities
Allows community schools to be located in multiple facilities if certain conditions are met. Aligns those conditions with the new rating system for community schools.

Amended Sec. 3314.35 Community School Closure
Describes the circumstances that would lead to the closure of a community school using the new rating system for schools before July 2013 and after July 2013.

States that for purposes of division (A)(3) of this section only, the value-added progress dimension for a community school shall be calculated using assessment scores for only those students to whom the school has administered the achievement assessments prescribed by section 3301.0710 of the Revised Code for at least the two most recent school years.

New Sec. 3314.351 Dropout Prevention and Recovery Community Schools
States that beginning on or after July 1, 2014, any such community school that has received a designation of “does not meet standards” as described in division (D)(1) of section 3314.017 of the Revised Code on the report card issued under that section, for at least two of the three most recent school years, shall be subject to closure.

Requires the ODE to notify each school subject to closure by the first day of September.

Amended Sec. 3314.36 Waivers for Dropout Prevention and Recovery Community Schools
States that until June 30, 2014, the ODE shall grant a waiver to a dropout prevention and recovery program, within sixty days after the program applies for the waiver, if the program meets all of the certain conditions unchanged by the bill.

States that beginning on July 1, 2014, all community schools in which a majority of the students are enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program are subject to the provisions of section 3314.351 of the Revised Code, regardless of whether a waiver has been granted under this section. Thereafter, no waivers shall be granted under this section.

Amended Sec. 3314.361 Community School Drug Recovery Program

Defines a community school operating a drug recovery program with a court as a dropout prevention and recovery school program regardless of the ages of the students or grade levels served.

Amended Sec. 3319.11 Teacher Evaluations
States that “Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Chapter 4117. of the Revised Code, the dates set forth in this section as “on or before the first day of June” or “on or before the fifteenth day of June” prevail over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after the effective date of this amendment.”

Amended Sec. 3319.111 Teacher evaluations/contracts
States that the teacher evaluation provisions do not apply to a person employed as an instructor of adult education.

Allows alternative student academic progress measures to be used if adopted by the state board of education.

States that “Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Chapter 4117. of the Revised Code, the requirements of sections 3119.11 and 3119.112 of the Revised Code prevail over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after September 24, 2012 and the effective date of this amendment.”

Amended Sec. 3319.112 Teacher Evaluation Framework Criteria
Requires multiple evaluation factors for the teacher evaluation framework. States that one factor shall be student academic growth which shall account for fifty per cent of each evaluation. When applicable to the grade level or subject area taught by a teacher, the value-added progress dimension or an alternative student academic progress measure shall be used in the student academic growth portion of an evaluation in proportion to the part of a teacher’s schedule of courses or subjects for which the value-added progress dimension is applicable. If a teacher’s schedule is comprised only of courses or subjects for which the value-added progress dimension is applied, until June 30, 2014, the majority of the student academic growth factor of the evaluation shall be based on the value-added progress dimension or after July 1, 2014, the entire student academic growth factor of the evaluation shall be based on the value-added progress dimension. In calculating student academic growth for an evaluation, a student shall not be included if the student has sixty or more unexcused absences for the school year.

States that the value-added progress dimension established under section 3302.021 of the Revised Code or an alternative student academic progress measure if adopted under division (C)(1)(e) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code shall be used in the student academic growth portion of an evaluation.

Amended Sec. 3319.58 Ineffective Teachers
Exempts community schools subject to Section 3314.017 (dropout prevention and recovery schools) from requiring classroom teachers in schools ranked in the lowest ten percent of all public school buildings to register for and take all written examinations of content knowledge selected by the ODE.

Amended Sec. 3326.03 STEM Schools
Allows an educational service center to submit proposals for new STEM schools through a partnership of public and private entities to the STEM committee.

Amended 5910.02 Ohio War Orphans Scholarship
Defines “veteran” as any person who was a member of the armed services of the United States and participated in an operation for which the armed forces expeditionary medal was awarded.

Permits the War Orphans Scholarship Board to apply for, receive, and accept, grants, gifts, bequests, and contributions from public and private sources, including agencies and instrumentalities of the United States and this state, and shall deposit the grants, gifts, bequests, or contributions into the Ohio war orphans scholarship fund.

New Sec. 5910.07 Ohio War Orphans Scholarship Fund
Creates the Ohio war orphans scholarship fund in the state treasury. The fund shall consist of gifts, bequests, grants, and contributions made to the fund. Investment earnings of the fund shall be deposited into the fund. The fund shall be used to operate the war orphans scholarship program and to provide grants under sections 5910.01 to 5910.06 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 5919.34 National Guard Scholarship Fund
Permits the chancellor and the adjutant general to apply for, and receive grants, gifts, bequests, and contributions, from public and private sources, including agencies and instrumentalities of the United States and this state, and shall deposit the grants, gifts, bequests, or contributions into the national guard scholarship reserve fund.

Temporary Law:

Section 3: Includes the following description of the General Assembly’s intent regarding these changes in law: “As Ohio prepares to transition to the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are scheduled to be fully implemented in the 2014-2015 school year, it is the intent of the General Assembly to put a new accountability system in place to help prepare the state’s students, parents, schools, and communities for the increased demands of a 21st Century education and to assure that our youngest students are provided the skills to successfully progress through our primary and secondary education system as evidenced by an emphasis on early literacy. The General Assembly intends that the system created in this act will assist our schools in the move to the Common Core through a comprehensive, data-driven evaluation system that can lead to academic excellence in schools across Ohio and will focus on the goal of assuring that all of our children graduate from high school adequately prepared to be successful in college or in the career of their choice. Further, the General Assembly intends that the system will pay special attention to closing the achievement gap that historically has left too many of our students behind.”

Section 4: Not later than August 31, 2013, the state board of education shall submit to the General Assembly under section 101.68 of the Revised Code recommendations for a comprehensive statewide plan to intervene directly in and improve the performance of persistently poor performing schools and school districts.

Section 5: Not later than December 31, 2013, the Department of Education shall review the additional information included on the school district and building report cards described in division (H) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code, as amended by this act, and shall submit to the Governor and the General Assembly, in accordance with section 101.68 of the Revised Code, recommendations for revisions to make the report cards easier to read and understand.

Section 6: Requires the State Board of Education not later than March 31, 2013, to submit to the General Assembly a one-year safe harbor for districts and schools for the first year that the assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers are administered in this state as achievement assessments. The recommendations shall include a method to exempt from sanctions and penalties prescribed by law, based on report card ratings, school districts, buildings operated by districts, community schools, STEM schools, and college preparatory boarding schools that have a decline in performance index score that is within two standard errors of measure below the Ohio statewide average decline in performance index score when compared to the performance index score from the previous year as determined by the Department of Education. However, districts or schools that have received an “F” for performance index score on the report card issued for the previous school year shall not be eligible for the exemption.

The recommendations shall specify that for those districts and schools to which the exemption applies, for purposes of determining whether a district or school is subject to any sanctions or penalties, the year that the assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers are first administered in this state shall not be considered.

However, the ratings of any previous or subsequent years shall be considered in determining whether a school district or building is subject to sanctions or penalties. Accordingly, the ratings for the year that the assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers are first administered shall have no effect in determining sanctions or penalties, but shall not create a new starting point for determinations that are based on ratings over multiple years.

The recommendations shall include the provisions from which an applicable district or building would be exempt, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Any restructuring provisions established under Chapter 3302. of the Revised Code, except as required under the “No Child Left Behind Act of 2001”;
  • Provisions for academic distress commissions under section 3302.10 of the Revised Code;
  • Provisions prescribing new buildings where students are eligible for the Educational Choice Scholarships under section 3310.03 of the Revised Code;
  • Provisions defining “challenged school districts” in which new start-up community schools may be located, as prescribed in section 3314.02 of the Revised Code;
  • Provisions prescribing community school closure requirements under section 3314.35 of the Revised Code.

Section 7: Amends section 3314.016 (Sponsorship of Community Schools) to take effect January 1, 2015.

Section 8: Requires the Department of Education, in consultation with entities that sponsor community schools, to prescribe quality practices for community school sponsors, develop an instrument to measure adherence to those quality practices, and publish the quality practices and instrument, so that they are available to entities that sponsor community schools prior to their implementation. The quality practices developed under this section shall be based on standards developed by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers or any other nationally organized community school organization.

Section 9: Amends Sec. 267.10.90 of HB153 of the 129th General Assembly to require the State Board of Education to set rules and dates for the administration of the English language arts assessments for the elementary grades.

FYI ARTS

Vans Custom Culture Competition: The Vans Custom Culture invites high school arts classes to compete in a competition to win money for their visual art program. Registered schools will receive four pairs of blank Vans sneakers to be customized in four themes: ART, MUSIC, ACTION SPORTS, AND LOCAL FLAVOR.

Custom Culture is a national high school shoe customized contest where schools from all over the United States compete for a chance to win money for arts programs. The Top Five finalists will be flown to New York City for an exclusive final event where the winner will be selected. The grand prize winning school will receive a $50,000 prize for their arts programs and the chance for their shoes to be produced and sold in Vans’ retail stores. The four runner up schools will also receive money for their arts programs. Additionally, national retail partner Journeys will award a separate $10,000 prize to one of the final five schools with the best local flavor themed pair of shoes.

Registration for the competition begins on January 2, 2013.
Information is available.

Arts Education Means More: Rob Schultz writes on the ARTSblog that arts education must exist beyond evaluation, measurement, and standards. (Arts Education Must Exist Beyond Evaluation, Measurement, and Standards by Rob Schultz, ARTSblog, December 11, 2012.)

According to the author, comprehensive approaches to learning that include the arts are important to address the personalized needs of students, but sometimes it is important for arts education to exist “… simply for the sake of enjoying what our students are doing, and just letting them do it. Without demands. Without complications. To allow expression to happen without worrying about whether or not it’s planned, measured, defined, linked, collaborative, progressive, sustainable, integrated, modeled, informed, competent, or transformational.”

The blog is available.

NEA Grants Awarded: The National Endowment for the Arts announced on November 27, 2012 awards for 71 arts education programs totaling over $2.023 million. Two awards were made to Ohio arts education organizations.

The Granville Studio of Visual Arts in Granville, OH was awarded a $15,000 grant to support Journey: Art of the Self-Portrait, a studio arts program for high school students. Students will gain curatorial skills by developing a public exhibition of their own art work in a community setting. Teaching artists will document each phase of the project using photography, journaling, and video of peer critiques.

The other Ohio grant was awarded to YS Kids Playhouse in Yellow Springs, OH. The program was awarded $10,000 to support the Summer Theater Arts Immersion program. Led by local, national, and international artists, students will study acting, technical theater, and music and create original and adapted performances that will be presented to the public.

Congratulations to the Ohio recipients!!

Information is available.

Students Learn to Read Through the Arts: Melissa Jenco writes in the Chicago Tribune that at-risk students in 21 Chicago city schools are using the arts to help them learn to read through the Reading in Motion’s Benchmarks program. (A musical twist to reading education: Reading in Motion’s Benchmarks program uses the arts to help at-risk students, December 12, 2012, by Melissa Jenco, Chicago Tribune.)

According to the article Reading in Motion, Karl Androes executive director, founded in 1983, partners with schools and teachers to create and deliver an innovative, supplemental reading program that uses music and drama to engage students. Reading In Motion’s mission is to get every at-risk student reading at or above grade level within the first years of school through the power and discipline of the arts. The program is supported by the Chicago Tribune Charities, a McCormick Foundation Fund.

The program uses the arts to reinforce reading including vocabulary development, sounding-out letters, and shaping letters using Play-Doh, pictures, and drawings. Teachers use the program 40 to 50 minutes a day, five days a week with kindergarten and first graders. A study of the effectiveness of the program found that 92 percent of the kindergarten students in the program for one year were reading at grade level, compared to 63 percent at grade level when the program began.

The program provides training for teachers during the summer and throughout the school year, and Reading in Motion coaches visit classrooms monthly to provide support.

The article is available.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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