Arts On Line Education Update 12.03.2012

129th General Assembly: The Ohio House and Senate will hold hearings and sessions this week.

Senate Leaders Elected: Ohio Senate Republicans elected last week Keith Faber Senate President for the 130th General Assembly. Senator Faber will take over the presidency from Senator Tom Niehaus, who was term-limited and will complete his term at the end of December 2012. Other members of the Senate Republican leadership team in the 130th General Assembly are Senators Chris Widener (Springfield) president pro tempore; Tom Patton (Strongsville) majority floor leader; and Larry Obhof (Medina) majority whip.

House Leaders Elected: House Republicans re-elected William Batchelder (Medina) as speaker for the 130th Ohio General Assembly. Other members of the Republican leadership team include Representatives Matt Huffman (Lima) speaker pro tempore; Barbara Sears (Sylvania) majority floor leader; John Adams (Sidney) assistant majority floor leader; Cheryl Grossman (Grove City) majority whip, and Jim Buchy (Greenville) assistant majority whip.

Education Bills Approved: The Ohio House approved two education bills last week, Sub. HB555 (Stebelton) and HB191 (Patmon/Hayes). An analysis of HB555 is included at #5 below.

HB191 was approved by a vote of 53 to 38. The bill would establish a minimum school year for school districts based on hours, rather than days of instruction. No hearings on this bill have been scheduled in the Senate.

Superintendent’s Search: Ray and Associates, the search firm hired by the State Board of Education to help them hire a superintendent of public instruction, is seeking comments from stakeholders regarding the characteristics and qualifications of the new superintendent. Comments will be accepted until December 6, 2012.

House Education Committee Update: The House Education Committee, Representative Stebelton chair, reported-out HB462 (Pelanda) Withholding grades or credits-abused child. This bill addresses circumstances in which school districts withhold or transfer to another district or school the grades and credits of a child who is alleged or adjudicated as abused, neglected, or dependent. The bill was amended allowing schools to request a copy of any order regarding the child’s custody or placement issued pursuant to a complaint filed under Sec. 2151.27 of the Revised Code.

Hearings this Week:

Senate Education Committee: The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on Tuesday, December 4, 2012 at 9:00 PM in the South Hearing Room and Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 10:00 AM in the North Hearing Room to consider Sub. HB555 (Stebelton) Accountability-New Report Cards and HB543 (Anielski) Suicide Awareness Training.

Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee: The Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee, chaired by Senator Coley, will meet on Thursday, December 6, 2012 at 9:30 AM in the South Hearing room to receive sponsor testimony on SB391 (Niehaus) Ethics Laws, a proposal by Senate President Niehaus to modernize Ohio’s ethics laws. The bill would require the Ohio Ethics Commission to publish the financial disclosure forms of public officials online and would update the reporting requirements for lobbyists.

House Finance and Appropriations Committee: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet on Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 9:30 AM in hearing room 313. The committee will receive testimony regarding funding for primary and secondary education and funding online instructional models.

National News

Finalists for Race to the Top: Three Ohio school districts/partnerships are among 61 finalists in the federal 2012 Race to the Top – District Competition. The Ohio finalists include the Cleveland Metropolitan School District; the Reynoldsburg City Schools, and the Ohio Appalachian Personalized Learning Network Collaborative. The schools are competing for funding from the $400 million federal Race to the Top – District Competition to support personalize learning, improve student achievement and educator effectiveness, close achievement gaps, and prepare every student for success in college and careers. According to the U.S. Department of Education only 15-25 applications will be accepted. The awards will range from $5 million to $40 million, and will be announced at the end of December.

New Campaign to Support Learning: The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) launched last week “Learning Is More Than a Test Score,” a campaign to inform the public about the components of high quality teaching and learning and de-emphasize high stakes testing. The campaign promotes student access to instruction in the arts and physical education and high-quality standards such as the Common Core. The AFT believes that policy-makers are fixating too much on testing, which is limiting student access to a well-rounded education.

According to the web site, “Public school educators, parents and students report that as low-quality standardized tests have taken on more importance, the amount of testing in school has increased while nontested subjects like social studies, art, music and hands-on science instruction have been reduced or squeezed out of the curriculum entirely. Because many of these subjects help students develop critical thinking, creativity and other vital 21st-century skills, forcing some students to forgo these experiences in exchange for testing and test preparation puts them at an unfair disadvantage.”

The AFT will be working with affiliates, communities, school districts, and states to help ensure that testing does not encroach on the instructional time students need to learn how to think critically and creatively.

In the next few months, the AFT will convene leaders and external experts to look at promising practices and develop a road map of promising policy alternatives to balance the emphasis on testing. The Albert Shanker Institute also will devote its Good Schools conference to this topic.

The AFT’s campaign includes a website, a toolkit and other items. The website is available.

Court Decides on Redistricting Maps: The Ohio Supreme Court issued a 4-3 decision on November 27, 2012 in Wilson et at v. Kasich, et. al denying plaintiffs’ request to declare unconstitutional the state’s current apportionment plan for the Ohio General Assembly. The majority opinion was written by Justice O’Donnell. Justices Lanzinger, Cupp and Judge Willamowski of the Third Appellate District concurred. Justices O’Connor, Pfeifer, and McGee Brown dissented. Judge Willamowski was sitting in for Justice Stratton.

The case was filed in January 4, 2012 by 36 electors living in various House Districts, and challenged the constitutionality of the apportionment plan approved by the Apportionment Board on September 30, 2011 based on Article XI, Sections 7 and 11.

Justice Terrence O’Donnell wrote the majority opinion saying that “….The Ohio Constitution does not mandate political neutrality in the reapportionment of house and senate districts” and that the burden of proof is on the plaintiffs to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the apportionment plan developed by the apportionment board is unconstitutional.

The minority disagreed with the majority’s arguments regarding burden of proof and whether or not the constitutional requirements for compactness and minimal splitting within single governmental districts had been met by the apportionment board.

The opinion is available.

Update on HB555: The Ohio House approved on November 29, 2012 HB555 (Stebelton) School Accountability/Local Report Card by a vote of 58 to 27. The bill now moves to the Senate Education Committee, which is expected to complete action on it before the 129th General Assembly ends this month.

The bill includes a variety of changes in education law, but focuses on three main issues: a new rating system for Ohio’s schools/districts; evaluations of sponsors of charter schools; and evaluations of dropout prevention and recovery schools. The bill directs the State Board of Education, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Ohio Department of Education to calculate standards, benchmarks, and approve rules to implement the provisions in the bill in a very short amount of time. Some school leaders are questioning the capacity of the ODE to complete this work after years of cut-backs and loss of staff.

Some of the provisions in the bill were originally included in SB316 (Lehner), the mid-biennial review for education, to comply with Ohio’s application for waivers from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Lawmakers decided to hold-back on the accountability changes, which were pulled from SB316 before it was approved and signed into law in June 2012. As a result, some provisions need to be finalized in order to comply with the waiver Ohio was granted.

The following is a summary of some of the provisions included in the bill:

Amended Section 3301.079 (D) Academic Standards
Replaces references to “English language arts” with the terms reading and writing.

Amended Sec. 3301.0710 (A)(2) Assessment
Increases the number of ranges of scores students can achieve on the achievement assessments from three to five: advanced level; accelerated; proficient; basic; and limited.

Amended Sec. 3301.0711 Graduation Requirements
Technical changes.

Amended Sec. 3301.0714 EMIS
Allows entities contracted by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to “develop” state assessments to access certain EMIS reports with staff and/or student information.

Amended Sec. 3302.01 Report Card Ratings Definitions
Performance Index Score: Allows the ODE to assign an additional weight to students who have passed over a grade or subject and have attained a proficient score or higher on a state assessment. The ODE shall assign each year an additional proportional weight to students who attain an advanced score. The State Board must approve this weight.

Subsets of Students: Adds students identified as gifted and students in the lowest quintile for achievement to the subset of students included in the performance index score. Students identified as gifted in superior cognitive will be included in the subset, along with students identified as gifted in reading and math. The ODE shall also include data for students with specific academic ability in other fields, if the field is assessed.

Graduation Rate: Includes the definition of the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate and the five-year adjusted cohort.

Annual Measurable Objectives: Defines annual measurable objectives as the progress determined in accordance with an agreement between the ODE and the U.S. Department of Education.

Amended Sec. 3302.02, Performance Indicators
Removes attendance from the set of performance indicators that the State Board of Education is required to establish, but retains the “breadth of coursework available within the district.”

Adds to the performance indicators for gifted education in the 2013-2014 school year, the level of gifted services provided; performance of students identified as gifted on state assessments; value added growth measure dis-aggregated for students identified as gifted; the level of gifted identification effort; appropriate licensed gifted staff levels; and the level of professional development provided to general education teachers working with gifted students and gifted spending.

Directs the State Board to set the percentage at 80 percent for all of the state achievement assessments for the 2013-2014 school year. Permits the State Board to adopt rules by July 1, 2014, establishing a different percentage to begin with the 2014-2015 school year.

Amended Sec. 3302.021 Value Added
Retains this section mostly unchanged, but eliminates the Accountability Task Force and creates the Ohio Accountability Advisory Committee, which consists of 14 members, and changes the membership categories and voting privileges of members of the new committee.

  • Retains the chairs and ranking minority members of the House and Senate education committees as voting members;
  • Retains the superintendent of public instruction or designee, but removes the voting privilege;
  • Removes one representative from the teachers’ unions, but adds three members from the public who have experience or expertise in education, statistics, and student data analysis or education public policy, appointed by the Speaker of the House;
  • Removes one representative of school boards of education, but adds three members of the public who have experience in education, statistics, and student data analysis or education public policy, appointed by the President of the Senate;
  • Removes one school district superintendent, but adds two members of the public who have experience in education, statistics, and student data analysis or education public policy, appointed by the Governor;
  • Removes members representing business, nonprofit organizations, school building principal, and a member of the State Board of Education, and replaces them with a member, who shall have experience or expertise as an analyst or auditor appointed by the Auditor of State.
  • Requires the committee to meet at least twice each calendar year, and report to the Governor, General Assembly, and State Board about the state’s accountability system.
  • Requires the committee to adopt recommendations to improve the school district and building accountability system.
  • Requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to annually submit to the Accountability Advisory Committee the results of the report cards.

Amended Sec. 3302.03 Report Cards
Eliminates the current report card criteria and establishes a new system for rating school districts and buildings based on letter grades A-F outlined in section (E). The State Board of Education is required to establish the performance criteria for each letter grade and prescribe a method to assign a letter grade. The bill states in part (E) that “A” means making excellent progress; “B” means making above average progress; “C” means making average progress; “D” means making below average progress; “F” means failing to meet minimum progress. The current requirement in law to disaggregate the data according to certain categories is retained with some changes for gifted education, and added is a new category comprised of students who achieve in the lowest quintile.

States that for a school building to which any of the performance measures do not apply, due to grade levels served by the building, the State Board shall designate the performance measures that are applicable to the building. This designation must be calculated separately and used to calculate the building’s overall grade.

Requires the ODE to issue annual report cards reflecting the performance profile of each school district, each building within each district, and for the state as a whole, using the performance measures and letter grade system. Requires the ODE to include on the report card for each district the most recent two-year trend data in student achievement for each subject and each grade.

Outlines in Section 3302.03 (A)(1) a-i; (B)(1) a-l; and (C)(1) a-n how grades in the performance measures for school districts and schools will be phased-in over school years 2012-13; 2013-14; and 2014-15. For some school years the percentage of students needed to receive a certain grade level changes, and indicators are added.

The following performance measures will be reported:

  • Annual measurable objectives, which replaces adequate yearly progress
  • Performance index score for a school district or building as a percentage of the total possible points as adopted by the State Board
  • Performance Indicators earned expressed as a percent
  • Four and five-year adjusted cohort graduation rates overall
  • Value added score based on three years of value added data
  • The rate of participation and average score among students enrolled in a district or building on a national standardized test for college admission, selected by the State Board
  • The percent of students in a district or building who enroll in state institutions of higher education or enroll out of state, and who are determined not to be college ready. (Excludes students not enrolled in college or who go in the military.)
  • Value added scores for subgroups of students
  • The percent of students who receive an honors diploma

Adds for the 2013-2014 school year three additional indicators: whether a school district or building is making progress in improving literacy in grades K through 3 as determined by the State Board of Education; the percentage of students who receive an honors diploma; and the results of the college and career ready assessments.

Adds for the 2014-2015 school year additional indicators: the results of the college and career-ready assessments and the percentage of students who receive industry credentials.

Includes on the report card without an assigned letter grade the rate of participation among students enrolled in a district or building in advanced placement classes and the percentage of those students who receive a score of three or better on advanced placement examinations; and the number of high school and college credits a district’s or building’s students have earned in that school year through dual enrollment programs.

Sets the deadlines for the State Board of Education to adopt resolutions describing the performance measures, benchmarks, and grading system for the 2012-13; 2013-14 and the 2014-15 school years.

Does not require an overall letter grade for a school district or school in the 2012-2013 or the 2013-2014 school years, but requires the ODE to establish a method to assign an overall grade for a school district or school building for the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter. The State Board shall adopt a grade for each separate component and an overall grade for the following:

  • Gap closing, which shall include the performance measure for annual measurable objectives
  • Achievement, which shall include the performance measures for the performance index score and performance indicators
  • Progress, which shall include the performance measures, value added, and the rate of participation and scores on a national standardized test for college admission
  • Graduation rates
  • Kindergarten through third-grade literacy
  • Prepared for success, which shall include the performance measures for participation and scores on a national standardized test for college admission, indicators for college and career ready, participation and scores on advanced placement exams, college credits earned, honors diploma, results of the college and career-ready assessments, and industry credentials.

Requires the ODE to conduct a public presentation before the House and Senate education committees at least forty-five days prior to the State Board’s adoption of rules to prescribe the methods for calculating the overall grade for the report card and describe the format for the report card, the weights that will be assigned to the components of the overall grade, and the method for calculating the overall grade.

Requires the State Board not later than July 1, 2015 to develop a measure of student academic progress for high school students, which shall be included on the report card beginning in the 2015-2016.

Requires the ODE to report when a particular student group did not receive a student performance data report, because there were less than ten students.

Amended Sec. 3302.033 Report Cards for Joint Vocational School Districts and Career Technical Planning Districts.
Allows data to be dis-aggregated for each joint vocational school district.

Includes districts that are not joint vocational.

NEW 3302.04 Additional Measures
Requires the State Board of Education by December 31, 2013 to adopt measures in addition to the report card, and report them separately for school districts, school buildings, community schools, STEM schools, and college preparatory boarding schools.

Data for students who have passed over a grade or subject area under an acceleration policy prescribed under section 3324.10 of the Revised Code;

The number of students who are eligible to receive and those that are receiving free lunch under the “National School Lunch Act,” 42 U.S.C. 1751, as amended, and the “Child Nutrition Act of 1966,” 42 U.S.C. 1771, as amended;

The number of lead teachers employed by each district and each building once the data is available through the education management information system established under section 3301.0714

The amount of students screened and identified as gifted under Chapter 3324. of the Revised Code;

  • Postgraduate student outcome data as described under division (E)(2)(d)(ii) of section 3314.017 of the Revised Code;
  • Availability of courses in fine arts;
  • Participation with other school districts to provide career-technical education services to students;
  • The amount of extracurricular services offered to students.

The department shall report this information annually beginning with the 2013-2014 school year and make this information available on its web site for comparison purposes.

Amended Section 3302.04 Transition for Designations
Clarifies that after the 2014-2015 school year, when a provision in law refers to a school or school district in academic emergency, academic watch, continuous improvement, it means the following: Academic emergency = F, Academic Watch = D, Continuous Improvement = C.

Maintains current agreements with the U.S. Department of Education regarding low performing schools.

States that for the 2012-2013 school year schools or districts that receive an “F” rating for the number of performance indicators met; performance index score; or a rating of “D” or “F” for value added, shall be subject to intervention rules and a site evaluation.

Amended Sec. 3302.041 Corrective Action Plans
Clarifies that corrective action plans for schools are contingent upon the approval of the U.S. Department of Education.

Amended Sec. 3302.042 Parent Trigger Pilot Project
Specifies that for the 2014-2015 school year and thereafter, schools in the pilot project (Columbus City School District) with a rating of “D” or “F” on the value-added progress dimension for three or more consecutive school years are eligible for the pilot project in addition to a school ranked by the performance index in the lowest five percent of public school buildings statewide.

Amended Sec. 3302.05 Exemptions from Mandates
Identifies the school districts eligible for exemptions from state mandates adopted by the State Board of Education based on the new rating system for schools.

Amended Sec. 3302.10 Academic distress commission
Identifies the school districts that must implement an academic distress commission based on the new rating system.

Amended Sec. 3302.12 Low Performing Schools
Identifies the school districts that must implement certain provisions regarding low performing schools based on the new rating system.

Amended Sec. 3302.20 Annual Operating Expenditures for Classroom Instruction
Requires data to be collected and reported from the college preparatory boarding school after two years of operations about operating expenditures for classroom instruction and non classroom purposes.

Adds the requirement that the ODE categorize all college-preparatory boarding schools in a single category.

Excludes community schools subject to Section 3314.17 (dropout prevention and recovery schools) from performance index scores rankings.

Amended Sec. 3302.21 Ranking City, Exempted Village, Local School Districts, and Community Schools
States that community schools subject to Section 3314.17 (dropout prevention and recovery schools), STEM schools subject to Section 3326, and college-preparatory boarding school subject to Section 3328 are excluded from rankings.

Permits the Superintendent of Public Instruction to develop another measure of student academic performance based on similar data and performance measures and to rank districts, schools, or buildings to which the performance index score does not apply.

Allows alternative student academic progress measures to be used to rank schools if adopted under division (C)(1)(e) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code.

Excludes from an annual report about school rankings issued by the ODE each September community schools subject to 3314.17; STEM schools subject to 3326; and college preparatory schools subject to 3328.

Amended Section 3310.03 Educational Choice Scholarship
Aligns the eligibility requirements for students seeking an Educational Choice Scholarship with the new rating system for schools/districts.

New 3310.16 Two Application Periods for the Educational Choice Scholarship
Establishes for the 2014-2015 school year and thereafter two application periods, the first day of February to July 1st and July 1st through mid August, for the Educational Choice Scholarship.

Amended Sec. 3311.80 Municipal School District
Permits the municipal school district to use an alternative student academic progress measure adopted by the State Board of Education in place of value added as a component of teacher evaluation.

States that “Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Chapter 4117. of the Revised Code, the requirements of this section prevail over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after October 1, 2012.”

Amended Sec. 3313.473 Site-based management councils
Aligns the requirements for a site-based management council with the new rating system for school districts and schools.

Amended Sec. 3313.608 Third Grade Reading Guarantee
Changes the term English language arts to reading and writing.

Requires students identified with a reading deficiency to receive intensive reading instruction services and regular diagnostic assessments until the development of the reading improvement and monitoring plan is implemented.

Amended Sec. 3314.011 Fiscal Officers
Requires fiscal officers of community schools to be licensed under Section 3301.074 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 3314.012 Report Cards for Community Schools
Exempts schools subject to Section 3314.017 (dropout and prevention recovery schools) from the ODE requirement to issue annual report cards for community schools.

Requires the report card for community schools to align with divisions (A), (B), (C) and (D) of Section 3302.03 of the Revised Code, rating system for schools.

Amended Sec. 3314.013 Internet or computer-based schools
Extends until the 61st day after the law has been enacted or after July 1, 2013 the prohibition regarding the opening of new internet/computer-based schools, with some exceptions. New schools may open subject to the approval of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Requires the Superintendent to approve applications for new internet/computer-based school from only those demonstrating experience and quality.

Requires the Superintendent to adopt rules prescribing measures to determine experience and quality of applicants. Measures shall include, but are not limited to, the sponsor’s experience, the operator’s experience, the sponsor and operator’s previous record of student achievement, a preference for operators with previous experience in Ohio.

Amended Sec. 3314.015 Community School Sponsors
Requires the ODE to evaluate the effectiveness of any and all sponsors of community schools.

Requires the State Board rather than the ODE to determine whether the mission proposed in the contract of a community school to be sponsored by a state university board of trustees complies with the requirements in the division, and if any tax exempt entity is an education-oriented entity for the purposes of sponsoring a community school.

Amended Sec. 3314.016 Rating Sponsors of Community Schools
Prohibits an entity from sponsoring additional community schools if it is rated as ineffective.

Requires the ODE to develop and implement an evaluation system that rates each entity that sponsors a community school based on the following components:

  • Academic performance of students enrolled
  • Adherence to the quality practices prescribed by the ODE. This provision can not be implemented until the ODE develops the quality practices and an instrument to measure adherence.
  • Compliance with applicable laws and administrative rules by an entity.

Requires the ODE to exclude from the academic component community schools in operation for less than two full years and community schools in division (A)(4)(b) of Sec. 3314.35. (Dropout recovery and prevention)

Requires the ODE to prescribe quality practices for community school sponsors and develop an instrument to measure adherence to the quality practices.

Requires the State Board of education not later than July 1, 2013 to adopt rules in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code prescribing standards for measuring compliance with applicable laws and rules under division (B)(1)(c) of this section.

Requires the ODE to rate all entities that sponsor community schools as either “exemplary,” “effective,” or “ineffective,” based on the components prescribed by division (B) of this section, where each component is weighted equally, except that entities sponsoring community schools for the first time may be assigned the rating of “emerging” for only the first two consecutive years.

Requires the ODE to publish the ratings between the first day of October and the 15th day of October.

States that prior to the 2014-2015 school year, student academic performance prescribed under division (B)(1)(a) of this section shall not include student academic performance data from community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program as described in division (A)(4)(a) of section 3314.35 of the Revised Code.

For the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter, student academic performance prescribed under division (B)(1)(a) of this section shall include student academic performance data from community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program.

Allows the ODE to assume sponsorship of community schools that has not yet opened and for which the sponsor has becomes ineligible until the governing authority of the new community school has secured a new sponsor or until two years has expired. The sponsorship by the ODE of a school under these circumstances does not count toward the ODE sponsor limit.

New Sec. 3314.017 Report Cards for Dropout and Prevention Community Schools
Requires the State Board of Education to adopt academic performance rating and a report card system for community schools that primarily serve students enrolled in dropout prevention and recovery programs beginning in the 2012-2013 school year.

States that nothing in this section shall at any time relieve a school from its obligations under the “No Child Left Behind Act of 2001” to make “adequate yearly progress.” The department shall continue to report each school’s performance as required by the act and to enforce applicable sanctions under section 3302.04 or 3302.041 of the Revised Code.

Requires the State Board to adopt the following performance indicators for the rating and report card system required by this section:

  • Graduation rate for students graduating in four years or less; those graduating in five years; those graduating in 6 years, 7 years, and 8 years with a high school diploma.
  • The percentage of twelfth-grade students currently enrolled in the school who have attained the designated passing score on all of the applicable state high school achievement assessments required under division (B)(1) or (2) of section 3301.0710 of the Revised Code and other students enrolled in the school, regardless of grade level, who are within three months of their twenty-second birthday and have attained the designated passing score on all of the applicable state high school achievement assessments by their twenty-second birthday.
  • Annual measurable objectives as defined in section 3302.01 of the Revised Code
  • Growth in student achievement in reading, or mathematics, or both as measured by separate nationally norm-referenced assessments that have developed appropriate standards for students enrolled in dropout prevention and recovery programs, adopted or approved by the state board.

Requires the State Board rules to prescribe the expected performance levels and benchmarks for each of the indicators based on the data gathered by the department. Based on a school’s level of attainment or non attainment of the expected performance levels and benchmarks for each of the indicators, the department shall rate each school in one of the following categories: Exceeds standards, Meets standards, or Does not meet standards.

Requires the State Board to establish performance levels and benchmarks for the indicators by certain dates.

Prescribes the percentage of the score that will be based on each indicator.

States that if both of the indicators for graduation rate and student achievement on certain state assessments improve by ten per cent for two consecutive years, a school shall be rated as “meets standards.”

Prescribes the components of the report cards for the 2012-2013; 2013-2014; 2014-2015 school years. Requires the ODE to also include student outcome data such as postsecondary credits earned, nationally recognized career or technical certificates, military enlistment, job placement, attendance rate, and progress on closing achievement gaps for each school.

Requires the ODE to gather data and work with stakeholders to determine how to measure student growth and requires schools to cooperate.

Requires the ODE to identify one or more states that have established or are in the process of establishing similar academic performance rating systems for dropout prevention and recovery programs and consult with the departments of education of those states in developing the system required by this section.

Amended Sec. 3314.02 Challenged School District
Aligns the definition of a challenged school district with the components of the new rating system.

Allows the governing board of an educational service center to sponsor a new start-up school in any challenged school district in the state if all of the following are satisfied: If applicable, it satisfies the requirements of division (E) of section 3311.86 of the Revised Code; it is approved to do so by the ODE; or it enters into an agreement with the ODE under section 3314.015 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 3314.05 Community School Multiple Facilities
Allows community schools to be located in multiple facilities if certain conditions are met. Aligns those conditions with the new rating system for community schools.

Amended Sec. 3314.35 Community School Closure
Describes the circumstances that would lead to the closure of a community school using the new rating system for schools.

States that for purposes of division (A)(3) of this section only, the value-added progress dimension for a community school shall be calculated using assessment scores for only those students to whom the school has administered the achievement assessments prescribed by section 3301.0710 of the Revised Code for at least the two most recent school years.

New Sec. 3314.351 Dropout Prevention and Recovery Community Schools
States that beginning on or after July 1, 2014, any such community school that has received a designation of “does not meet standards” as described in division (D)(1) of section 3314.017 of the Revised Code on the report card issued under that section, for at least two of the three most recent school years shall be subject to closure.

Requires the ODE to notify each school subject to closure by the first day of September.

Amended Sec. 3314.36 Waivers for Dropout Prevention and Recovery Community Schools
States that until June 30, 2014, the ODE shall grant a waiver to a dropout prevention and recovery program, within sixty days after the program applies for the waiver, if the program meets all of the certain conditions unchanged by the bill.

States that beginning on July 1, 2014, all community schools in which a majority of the students are enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program are subject to the provisions of section 3314.351 of the Revised Code, regardless of whether a waiver has been granted under this section. Thereafter, no waivers shall be granted under this section.

Amended Sec. 3319.111 Teacher evaluations/contracts
States that notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Chapter 4117. of the Revised Code, the requirements of sections 3119.11 and 3119.112 of the Revised Code prevail over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after September 24, 2012 and the effective date of this amendment.

Amended Sec. 3319.112 Teacher Evaluations
States that the value-added progress dimension established under section 3302.021 of the Revised Code or an alternative student academic progress measure if adopted under division (C)(1)(e) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code shall be used in the student academic growth portion of an evaluation.

Amended Sec. 3319.58 Ineffective Teachers
Exempts community schools subject to Section 3314.017 (dropout prevention and recovery schools) to require classroom teachers in schools ranked in the lowest ten percent of all public school buildings to register for and take all written examinations of content knowledge selected by the ODE.

Amended Sec. 3326.03 STEM Schools
Allows an educational service center to submit proposals for new STEM schools through a partnership of public and private entities to the STEM committee.

Amended 5910.02 Ohio War Orphans Scholarship
Permits the War Orphans Scholarship Board to apply for, receive, and accept, grants, gifts, bequests, and contributions from public and private sources, including agencies and instrumentalities of the United States and this state, and shall deposit the grants, gifts, bequests, or contributions into the Ohio war orphans scholarship fund.

New Sec. 5910.07 Ohio War Orphans Scholarship Fund
Creates the Ohio war orphans scholarship fund in the state treasury. The fund shall consist of gifts, bequests, grants, and contributions made to the fund. Investment earnings of the fund shall be deposited into the fund. The fund shall be used to operate the war orphans scholarship program and to provide grants under sections 5910.01 to 5910.06 of the Revised Code.

Amended Sec. 5919.34 National Guard Scholarship Fund
Permits the chancellor and the adjutant general to apply for, and receive grants, gifts, bequests, and contributions, from public and private sources, including agencies and instrumentalities of the United States and this state, and shall deposit the grants, gifts, bequests, or contributions into the national guard scholarship reserve fund.

Temporary Law:

Section 4: Not later than August 31, 2013, the state board of education shall submit to the General Assembly under section 101.68 of the Revised Code recommendations for a comprehensive statewide plan to intervene directly in and improve the performance of persistently poor performing schools and school districts.

Section 5. Not later than December 31, 2013, the Department of Education shall review the additional information included on the school district and building report cards described in division (H) of section 3302.03 of the Revised Code, as amended by this act, and shall submit to the Governor and the General Assembly, in accordance with section 101.68 of the Revised Code, recommendations for revisions to make the report cards easier to read and understand.

Section 7. Requires the Department of Education, in consultation with entities that sponsor community schools, to prescribe quality practices for community school sponsors, develop an instrument to measure adherence to those quality practices, and publish the quality practices and instrument, so that they are available to entities that sponsor community schools prior to their implementation. The quality practices developed under this section shall be based on standards developed by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers or any other nationally organized community school organization.

Section 8. Amends Sec. 267.10.90 of HB 153 of the 129th General Assembly to require the State Board of Education to set rules and dates for the administration of the English language arts assessments for the elementary grades.

Higher Education Leaders Propose New Funding Formula: Governor Kasich requested in September 2012 that a commission of college and university leaders propose a new state funding system for higher education based on the current level of state funding, which is expected to be available in the FY14-15 biennial budget. On November 30, 2012 the commission, led by Ohio State University president E. Gordon Gee, presented the recommendations and policy changes to Governor Kasich and Chancellor Jim Petro in a report entitled, Recommendations of the Ohio Higher Education Funding Commission. The recommendations and policy changes will be phased-in over three years.

According to the report, Ohio’s is leading the nation in efforts to “invest in institutions that demonstrate a commitment to student success and economic development”. The Ohio Higher Education Funding Commission will remain intact throughout the budget process to continue to refine the recommendations and to support the implementation of the policy changes.

The following recommendations are included in the report:

  • Funding for community colleges in Ohio should transition from a system that mainly rewards enrollment in classes to one that rewards the completion of classes, certificates and degrees.
  • All university students on all campuses (main or regional) should be treated equally in the funding formula and in any relevant state laws.
  • Colleges and universities should be rewarded if they attract out-of-state students to Ohio and keep them in the state for employment or continued education.
  • Historical set-asides and earmarks should be eliminated so that all of the state’s funding flows through the new completion-based formula.
  • Ohio’s community colleges should review the current success points incentive system, which has proven very successful, to ensure it is fully capturing the range of activities that lead to completion.
  • Ohio’s community colleges should develop a new degree incentive component for the second year of the biennium that rewards the completion of an associate degree, certificate or transfer to a university.
  • The Ohio board of regents should work with campus leaders and faculty to begin establishing statewide standards for certificates. Once a standard is developed for a specific certificate, it should be rewarded through the state formula.
  • A new weighting system is recommended in the second year of the biennium for non-traditional and at-risk students to ensure that Ohio’s schools maintain their access mission.

To implement the recommendations, the commission proposed the following policy changes incorporated into the new university formula:

  • Move 50 percent of state funding into degree completion. In the current formula, 20 percent of state funding is awarded based on degree attainment. This proposal increases the percentage to 50 percent.
  • Remove the separate funding formula for regional campuses. In the current formula, funding is set aside for regional campuses and distributed on a course completion basis. This proposal removes the set-aside, and treats all students in the university sector the same, regardless of where they are located.
  • Out of state undergraduate students. The new formula proposes a 50% FTE credit in the degree attainment portion for out-of-state undergraduate degrees. However, those students would have to remain in Ohio after graduation to be counted in the formula. The State of Ohio would be asked to cross-reference student graduation data with other state data to ensure they are still in Ohio one year after being awarded a degree. Graduate funding would apply to all students.
  • Award credit for Associate Degrees. The new proposal gives credit within the state formula for associate degrees earned at all regional and main campuses. Currently, only a small number of main campuses earn credit for associate degrees.
  • Remove the stop loss. This historical safeguard, which redistributes funding from high performing  schools to prevent funding losses at other schools, is recommended for elimination.
  • Remove Access Challenge & square footage (POM) based earmarks from regional campuses. These historical earmarks are applied to a limited number of campuses. In the most recent budget, Access Challenge totaled $17 million (mostly at regional campuses) and POM totaled $3 million. The commission recommends removing the Access and POM set-asides on regional campuses for the FY13 budget, and fully removing the appropriations for main campuses in the following budget.
  • Adopt a standard three-year average The current formula uses several different methods of averaging. In the interest of appropriate planning and transition, the commission recommends adopting a standard three-year average in year one of the budget and all future years.
  • Apply STEM weights to degree completion model. In the current formula, the STEM weights only apply at the course level. Under the new proposed formula, STEM weights would also apply at the degree level.
  • Proportional credit for transfer students. In the current formula, degree attainment funding is awarded exclusively to the institution from which the student graduated. The new formula proposes to award proportional degree credit to each university based on the actual amount of credits taken at that university.
  • Apply at-risk weights at the student level in the formula. In the current formula, at-risk weights are applied at the campus level through a campus index, which attempts to reflect the proportion of at- risk students at each campus. The new formula proposes to remove the campus index, and instead apply the at-risk weights directly at the student level when they graduate based on their precise level of at-risk categories.

The following are policy changes for the community college formula:

  • Transition funding from enrollment to completion. In the current formula, only 10 percent of state funds are distributed by success points. Recommendation: In the first year of the biennium, funding is distributed 25 percent to success points, 25 percent based on course completion and 50 percent based on enrollment. In the second year of the biennium, the community colleges will make a recommendation to the Chancellor on how to distribute the funds, although none of those categories will be awarded based on enrollment.
  • Develop a degree completion incentive. A new formula provision will be developed for the second year of the budget to reward the successful completion of an associate degree, certificate or transfer to a university.
  • Develop a new at-risk formula weight. In order to protect the access mission of Ohio’s community colleges, a new formula weight is recommended for the second year of the budget to reward schools that are successful in educating non-traditional and at-risk student populations.
  • Remove the stop loss. This historical safeguard, which redistributes funding from high performing schools to prevent funding losses at other schools, is recommended for elimination.
  • Remove Access Challenge earmarks from regional campuses. These historical earmarks are applied to a limited number of campuses. In the most recent budget, Access Challenge totaled $54.4 million.

The recommendations are available.

FYI ARTS

Governor’s Awards in the Arts Announced: Governor Kasich’s office announced last week the following winners of the 2013 Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio:

Arts Administration – Jill Snyder, Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (Cleveland);
Arts Education – Stivers School for the Arts (Dayton);
Arts Patron – Charlotte Kessler (New Albany) and Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Schuster (Dayton);
Business Support of the Arts – PNC Bank (Statewide)
Community Development and Participation – Raymond Shepardson (Cleveland);
Individual Artist – Jack Earl (Lakeview) and Joseph O’Sickey (Kent).

The winners were selected from 66 nominations submitted by individuals and organizations throughout Ohio. They will receive an original work of art by Parma painter Susan Danko at the 2013 Governor’s Awards for the Arts luncheon ceremony, which will be held at 12:00 PM on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 at the Columbus Athenaeum in downtown Columbus. The event will be hosted by the Ohio Arts Council and Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation and presented in partnership with The Ohio Channel. The award luncheon is held each year in conjunction with ARTS DAY, a day-long event sponsored by the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation. Other ARTS DAY events include an arts advocacy briefing, legislative visits by students representing ten high schools in Ohio, an arts showcase, and student exhibitions.

More information on Arts Day 2013 can be obtained here.

The 2013 Best Communities for Music Education survey has launched! Teachers, parents, school administrators and board members are invited to complete the 2013 Best Communities survey online now through Friday, January 18, 2013. Many districts reported that making the “Best Communities” list has had a positive effect on their ability to sustain and advance music education programs. In 2012, 176 communities were recognized, including 166 school districts and 10 schools.

“The designation has helped to validate the work of the students, faculty, administration and community in building a music program of which we all can be proud,” said Brian P. Timmons, district music coordinator of Bergenfield public schools, in Bergenfield, N.J. “Though the economic crisis, we have been able to continue to grow and develop our program with unprecedented participation. Our designation has undoubtedly been a positive factor in that success.”

The BCME survey asks detailed questions about funding, graduation requirements, music class participation, instruction time, facilities, support for the music program, and other relevant factors about their communities’ music education programs. One application may be submitted for school districts and community members are encouraged to work together to complete the comprehensive survey.

The Institute for Educational Research and Public Service of Lawrence, Kansas, an affiliate of the University of Kansas, hosts the survey and has updated and refined processes for assessment of community selection. Survey responses are verified with district officials and then advisory organizations review the data.

The survey is available for review.

Complete the District Survey today.

Complete the School survey today.

Holiday Performances at the Statehouse: Musical groups from schools in central Ohio will be performing at the Statehouse starting Wednesday December 4, 2012 at noon. The performances will take place in the Museum Gallery on the ground floor of the Ohio Statehouse. The concerts are free and open to the public.

Scheduled musical performances include the following:

Dec. 4 – Westland High School, Galloway
Dec. 5 – Hamilton Twp. High School, Columbus
Dec. 6 – Eastmoor Academy, Columbus
Dec. 7 – Grove City Christian School, Grove City
Dec. 10 – Johnstown-Monroe High School, Johnstown
Dec. 11 – Jackson Center High School, Jackson Center
Dec. 12 – FCI Kindergarten Village, Columbus
Dec. 13 – Kenton Ridge High School, Springfield
Dec. 14 – Lancaster High School, Lancaster
Dec. 17 – Centennial High School, Columbus
Dec. 18 – Northside Christian School, Westerville

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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