Arts On Line Update 04.30.2012

Special Alert:  Hearings on School Funding to Begin

The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will begin hearings on Ohio’s school funding system on May 1, 2012, when Paolo DeMaria, currently at the Ohio Board of Regents, will present two of three presentations on school funding basics. The hearings are scheduled for May 1, 2012 at 1:30 PM and May 2, 2012 at 9:00 AM.  They will take place at the Statehouse in Columbus in room 313. Additional hearings on school funding at the Statehouse and regional hearings are also being planned. Information about these hearings will be included in future Arts on Line Education Updates.

These hearings provide arts education advocates opportunities to do the following:

1) Describe the impact of school district budget cuts on arts education programs and on the students in your school/district. Arts education advocates should contact representatives in the Ohio House, Senate, and State Board of Education to let them know what arts courses, programs, and grade levels have been cut in their school/district, and how these cuts will affect sequential learning in the arts and students selecting to pursue continuing education and careers in the arts.

2) Advocate for the following: Ohio’s school funding system should provide sufficient financial support to ensure that all students have sequential, standards-based learning opportunities in the arts (defined as dance, drama theatre, music, and visual art) in grades K-12, so that by the end of 12th grade all students have

  • experienced the fine arts:  dance, drama/theater, music and visual art
  • studied at least one art form in depth
  • graduated with at least one high school credit in the arts, and
  • are prepared with the knowledge and skills to pursue a career in the arts or higher education in the arts, if that is their choice.

(These expectations are listed on p.2 of the Academic Content Standards for the Fine Arts, adopted by the State Board of Education in December 2003.)

Locate your legislator.

Locate your State Board of Education representative.

129th Ohio General Assembly:  The Ohio House and Senate will hold committee hearings and sessions this week.

Update on Mid Biennial Review (MBR):  The Ohio House approved on April 25, 2012 several parts of the Mid Biennial Review legislative package, which includes ten bills in the House and SB316 (Lehner) Education and SB315 (Jones S.) Energy in the Senate. The following MBR bills were approved:

  • Am. Sub. HB487 (Amstutz), Mid Biennial Review:  Makes operating and other appropriations, levies taxes, and provides for implementation of those levies, and provides authorization and conditions for the operation of state programs. Vote 62-34.
  • HB508 (Beck) tax changes:  Makes changes to the laws governing the assessment, levy, and collection of taxes in the state. Vote 91-3. This bill includes several changes in law that affect school district, municipal, township, and library property taxes and reimbursements of the tangible personal property tax.
  • HB509 (Blair) local governments:  Makes changes to the laws governing local governments. Vote 88-8.

Other Bills Passed by the House:  The Ohio House also approved last week HB437 (Roegner/Patmon) School Vehicles-Out of State Travel, which would increase the number of miles a school district board may authorize its motor vehicles for out-of-state travel, and HB375 (Butler) Property Sale by School Districts, which would allow school districts to sell real property to private, nonprofit institutions of higher education.

Update on SB295 (Coley):  Although SB295 was informally passed by the Ohio House on April 25, 2012, lawmakers are discussing with Fair Elections Ohio a proposed compromise regarding SB295 and the status of a referendum in November 2012 on HB194.

To recap, after HB194 (Mecklenborg-Blessing) Election Reform was signed into law on July 1, 2011, citizens, led by Fair Elections Ohio, mounted a successful referendum campaign, which allows voters to approve or disapprove of the law in the November 6, 2012 election.

SB295 repeals HB194, but there are two main controversies that lawmakers are trying to resolve as the Ohio House is considering SB295: First, lawmakers are debating the constitutionality of repealing a law that is already facing a referendum.  Second, SB295 does not “restore” election law prior to HB194, because additional changes in election law were included in another bill which became law, HB224 (Dovilla-Stinziano).  For example, Fair Election Ohio wants to restore in-person early voting on the Saturday – Monday before Election Day.  This provision was changed in HB194 and in HB224, but through different sections of Ohio law, so repealing HB194 through SB295 will not restore election law prior to HB194.

Bills Increase Tax Credits for Films Made in Ohio:  The House Ways and Means and the Senate Ways and Means Committee both received testimony last week on two bills (HB521 – Dovilla and SB331 – Patton) that would increase the maximum total amount of tax credits allowed per year for completion of motion pictures certified as tax credit-eligible productions.  According to the Ohio Department of Development, 31 projects have been awarded Ohio Motion Picture Tax Credits since the program began in 2010. Films made in Ohio include Take Shelter, The Avengers, The Soloist, Major League, and Air Force One.

The Ohio Motion Picture Tax Credit program expires in June 2012.  The program reimburses filmmakers 25 percent of what they spend in Ohio and 35 percent of wages paid to Ohio residents.

Ohio House Welcomes New Members:  The House seated last week Gary Scherer of Circleville to represent the 85th House District and Marilyn Slaby of Copley to represent the 41st House District. The House still has one vacancy to fill.

House Education Committee Reports Bills:  The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, reported out on April 25, 2012 HB377 (Duffey/Stinziano) Student Members of Trustees — Voting Powers and HB191 (Hayes/Patmon) Minimum School Year.

This Week at the Statehouse
TUESDAY, MAY 1, 2012
Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner The Senate Education Committee will meet at 9:30 AM in the South Hearing Room.  The committee will receive sponsor testimony on SB335 (Turner/Lehner) Municipal School Districts-Community Schools.

House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz The House Finance and Appropriations Committee will meet at 1:30 PM, Hearing Room 313.  The committee will receive an overview of Ohio’s school funding system from Paolo DeMaria, the Ohio Board of Regents.

Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Widener The Senate Finance Committee will meet at 2:30 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room and receive sponsor testimony on Am. Sub. HB487 (Amstutz) Mid Biennium Review.

House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton The House Education Committee will meet at 5:00 PM, House Hearing Room 313.  The committee will receive sponsor testimony on HB525 (Williams/Amstutz) Municipal School Districts/Community Schools. Also invited to testify are Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, Cleveland Metropolitan School District CEO Eric Gordon and Cleveland Teachers Union president, David Quolke.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 2012
House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz The House Finance and Appropriations Committee will meet at 9:00 PM, Hearing Room 313.  The committee will receive an overview of Ohio’s school funding system from Paolo DeMaria, the Ohio Board of Regents.

Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Widener The Senate Finance Committee will meet at 2:30 PM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room and receive testimony on Am. Sub. HB487 (Amstutz) Mid Biennium Review.

THURSDAY, MAY 3, 2012
Senate Finance Committee, chaired by Senator Widener The Senate Finance Committee will meet at 11:00 AM in the Senate Finance Hearing Room and receive sponsor testimony on Am. Sub. HB487 (Amstutz) Mid Biennium Review.

Update from Washington, D.C.
Action on Student Loan Rate Hike: Several members of Congress are proposing ways to retain the 3.4 percent interest rate on Stafford loans for over 7 million college students after President Obama and others raised public awareness about the pending increase. The interest rate, enacted in 2007, is scheduled to increase to 6.8 percent on July 1, 2012. A budget approved by the U.S. House had allowed the rate to increase, but public pressure last week moved House Republicans to approve on April 27, 2012 H.R.4628, the Interest Rate Reduction Act, sponsored by Representative Judy Biggert. H.R.4628 retains the lower rate but pays for it by reducing funding for the “Prevention and Public Health Fund”, part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act. The Prevention and Public Health Fund provides $11.9 billion for cancer screening, child immunizations, and programs to help people quit smoking and lose weight. Most Democrats voted against H.R. 4628, which is unlikely to pass the Democratic controlled Senate.

Several Democrats, including Senator Tom Harkin, chair of the Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee, and Representative George Miller, the ranking member of the House Education and Workforce Committee, are proposing to fund the low interest rate by cutting oil subsidies and/or certain business tax breaks.

National Teacher of the Year Announced:  Rebecca Mieliwocki was named the National Teacher of the Year on April 23, 2012 and was honored by President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House. Ms. Mieliwocki is a seventh-grade teacher in suburban Los Angeles.

TurnAround: ARTS Creating Success in Schools:  The President’s Committee on Arts and Humanities announced on April 23, 2012 a new public-private arts education partnership to turn around low-performing schools called “Turnaround Arts” (TAI).  The initiative was developed in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Education and the White House Domestic Policy Council. Turnaround Arts will be managed by the Arts Education Partnership, a national coalition administered by the Council of Chief State School Officers, the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the U.S. Department of Education.

The purpose of Turnaround Arts is to narrow the achievement gap and increase student engagement through the arts in the nation’s lowest performing elementary and middle schools.  The program will “test the hypothesis that high quality and integrated arts education boosts academic achievement, motivates student learning and improves school culture in the context of overall school reform.”

Turnaround Arts will work in eight “turnaround schools”, and over the course of two years will bring intensive arts education resources and expertise into these schools and support the school leadership in using the arts as a reform strategy. An external evaluation of the program will measure the impact and effectiveness of this approach. The schools were competitively selected from among those already receiving a School Improvement Grant. They are

(1) Batiste Cultural Arts Academy at Live Oak School in New Orleans, LA (PK-8)
(2) Findley Elementary School in Des Moines, IA (PK-5)
(3) Lame Deer Jr. High School in Lame Deer, MT (7,8)
(4) Noel Community Arts School in Denver, CO (6,7)
(5) Orchard Gardens K-8 School in Boston, MA (K-8)
(6) Savoy Elementary School in Washington, DC (PK-5)
(7) Martin Luther King, Jr. School in Portland, OR
(8) Roosevelt School in Bridgeport, CT (K-8)

Presidentially-appointed artists on the Committee, Chuck Close, Sarah Jessica Parker, Kerry Washington, Forest Whitaker, Yo-Yo Ma, Damian Woetzel and Alfre Woodard, will “adopt” one of the selected schools for the length of the program, and work with the schools and communities.

The partners in Turnaround Arts include the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, the Herb Alpert Foundation, Crayola, NAMM Foundation, the Aspen Institute, and Booz Allen Hamilton. Inktel and SKDKnickerbocker are providing additional support and resources.

More information is available.

Education Provisions included in HB487:  Am. Sub. HB487 (Amstutz), Mid Biennial Review, as approved by the Ohio House, includes a new provision that requires the General Assembly to take action before any surplus can be deposited into the rainy day fund. According to the Office of Budget and Management, Ohio is expected to have a surplus at the end of this fiscal year, and advocacy groups are already requesting that the surplus be used to support a variety of programs that have been cut in the current budget, including early care and education, health/mental health services, human services, local government funds, etc.  Am. Sub. HB487 also includes the following education provisions:

Early Childhood:  Requires each early childhood education program that receives state funding through GRF appropriation item, 200408, Early Childhood Education, to participate in the Step Up to Quality Program administered by the Department of Job and Family Services, and to be rated in the Program by July 1, 2016. -Requires school districts, educational service centers, and county DD boards serving preschool children with disabilities to participate in the Step Up to Quality Program administered by the Department of Job and Family Services, and to be rated in the Program by July 1, 2018.

NEW – Cleveland Scholarship Program: Eliminates the income-based reduction required by current law for scholarships under the Cleveland Scholarship Program. Currently, each scholarship award is reduced by either 10 percent or 25 percent, depending upon the student’s family income, with the balance of the award to be paid by a political subdivision, a private entity, or an individual. The bill increases Foundation Funding (200550) by $2.3 million to cover the state share of the scholarship.

NEW eTech Ohio Commission: Eliminates the eTech Commission and transfers its duties to the ODE, in coordination with the Chancellor of the Board of Regents.  Also transfers funds for eTech to the Ohio Department of Education.

Digital Task Force:  Extends the Digital Learning Task Force to June 30, 2012 and requires the task force to submit a report by June 30, 2012.

School District Property:  Makes possible certain sales of school district property for residential development and to a certain state university.

School Management Assistance:  Reduces an earmark used by the Auditor of State for school district auditing in GRF appropriation item 200422, School Management Assistance, from $1,300,000 to $1,000,000 in FY13. Under continuing law, the remaining appropriation in this line item is to be used by ODE to provide fiscal technical assistance to school district management personnel.

School Choice Funding:  Permits an earmark of $2.271 million in FY13 for GRF appropriation item 200550, Foundation Funding, to be used for school choice programs, rather than for the Cleveland school choice program, and appropriates additional funds, if necessary, to GRF appropriation item 200550, Foundation Funding, for scholarship payments made under the Cleveland Scholarship Program.

Consolidated Line Items:  Makes changes that affect appropriation item 200321, which consolidates GRF items 200100 Personal Services and 200320 Maintenance and Equipment, and appropriation item 200416, Career-Technical Education Match.

Update on the Cleveland Plan: Two new bills were introduced on April 25, 2012 in the Ohio House and Senate to implement changes for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District proposed by Mayor Frank Jackson, business and foundation leaders, and agreed to, in part, by the Cleveland Teachers Union.  The bills, SB335 (Turner-Lehner) and HB525 (Williams-Amstutz) “replace”  SB325 and HB506, which were introduced several weeks ago.  The new bills include provisions recently negotiated by Mayor Jackson and the Cleveland Teachers Union. The following is a preliminary summary of the bills:

  • Overall the bills amend several sections of education law to align with new Sections 3311.77 to 86. Sections 3311.71 to 76 in current law refer to a municipal school district (the Cleveland Metropolitan School District – CMSD) in which the mayor appoints a nine-member board of education.
  • Sec. 2921.02 Cleans-up language about bribery of a state official. New provisions (E) and (F) state that no persons should bribe a member of the transformation alliance established in this legislation.
  • Sec. 3302.03 (6) (c) Performance Standards:  Permits a municipal school district under Section 3311.71 of the Revised Code, to combine the academic performance of students enrolled in the community school with comparable data from the schools of the district for the purpose of calculating the performance of the district as a whole on the district’s report card, and to have the students attending the community school included in the district’s average daily student enrollment as reported in the district’s report card. Any district that so elects shall annually file with the department a copy of the lease or agreement and other documentation indicating eligibility, as required by the department. States that this section does not apply to dropout recovery schools
  • Sec. 3311.74. (B)(1) School Improvement Plans: Requires the chief executive officer of a municipal school district to develop a plan that “requires the parents or guardians of students who attend low-performing schools to attend, prior to the thirty-first day of December each year, at least one parent-teacher conference or similar event held by the school the student attends to provide an opportunity for the parents and guardians to meet the student’s teachers, discuss expectations for the student, discuss the student’s performance, and foster communication between home and school.” (B)(2) Requires the chief executive officer, with the concurrence of the board, to take corrective action in low performing schools, including “adjusting the length of the school year or school day.”  (B)(3) Requires the chief executive officer, prior to taking corrective action pursuant to the plan, to identify which schools are in need of corrective action, what corrective action is warranted at each school, and when the corrective action should be implemented. Collectively, these items shall be known as the “corrective plan.” States that “The corrective plan is not intended to be used as a cost savings measure; rather, it is intended to improve student performance at targeted schools.” Requires the chief executive officer and the presiding officer of each labor organization whose members will be affected by the corrective plan to each appoint up to four individuals to form one or more corrective action teams, and implement the plan with a timeline set by the chief executive officer. Allows the chief executive officer to implement another plan if he/she disagrees with all or part of the recommendations of a corrective action team, or if a corrective action team fails to make timely recommendations on the implementation of all or part of the corrective plan. States that the chief executive officer and any corrective action team are not bound by the applicable provisions of collective bargaining agreements in developing recommendations for and implementing the corrective plan. (B)(4)”Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in Chapter 4117 of the Revised Code, the content of the plan developed under this division and any actions taken to implement the plan prevail over any conflicting provision of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after the effective date of this amendment.”
  • Sec. 3311.76. Exemptions:  Permits the Superintendent of Instruction to exempt the municipal school district from certain laws under Title 33 of the Ohio Revised Code and rules. Exceptions apply to Sections 3302, 3317, 3323 (Special Education), and parts of 3307, 3309, and 3319.
  • NEW:  3311.77 Teacher Contracts/municipal school district.  Requires a municipal school district to comply with this section rather than 3319.08 of the Revised Code and states that Section 3319.0811 of the Revised Code shall not apply to the municipal school district. Describes the terms of a contract for a municipal school district and the conditions of employment.
  • NEW:  3311.78 Salary Schedules.  Requires the board of education of each municipal school district to annually adopt a differenciated salary schedules for principals and teachers based on performance as outlined in (D) of this section. Requires the board to determine the teacher’s or principal’s initial placement on the applicable salary schedule based on years of experience and area of licensure and any other factors the board considers appropriate, and initially place the teacher on the applicable salary schedule so that the teacher’s annual salary on the schedule is comparable to the teacher’s annual salary for the school year immediately prior to the school year covered by the schedule. For each principal hired prior to the effective date of this section, the board shall initially place the principal on the applicable salary schedule consistent with the principal’s employment contract. (C) States that the salary of a teacher shall not be reduced unless such reduction is accomplished as part of a negotiated collective bargaining agreement. The salary of a principal shall not be reduced during the term of the principal’s employment contract unless such reduction is by mutual agreement of the board and the principal or as part of a uniform plan affecting the entire district. (D) Prescribes the following be used to measure a teacher’s or principal’s performance to determine salary: (1) The level of license issued under section 3319.22 of the Revised Code that the teacher or principal holds; (2) Whether the teacher or principal is a highly qualified teacher, as defined in section 3319.074 of the Revised Code; (3) Ratings received by the teacher or principal on performance evaluations conducted under section 3311.80 or 3311.84 of the Revised Code. (4) Specialized training and experience. (E) Allows teachers and principals to receive additional compensation for duties, not contracted for under a supplemental contract, that the board determines warrant additional compensation. Those duties may include, but are not limited to, assignment to a school building eligible for funding under Title I of the “Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965,” 20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq.; assignment to a building in “school improvement” status under the “No Child Left Behind Act of 2001,” as defined in section 3302.01 of the Revised Code; teaching in a grade level or subject area in which the board has determined there is a shortage within the district; assignment to a hard-to-staff school, as determined by the board; or teaching in a school with an extended school day or school year. (F) Allows the board to increase a teacher’s or principal’s salary based on performance and duties upon the recommendation of the chief executive officer. The performance-based increase for a teacher or principal rated as accomplished shall be greater than the performance-based increase for a teacher or principal rated as proficient. The board can also decrease the teacher’s or principal’s salary if the teacher or principal will perform fewer or different duties described in division (E) of this section in the school year for which the salary is decreased. (G) States that this section prevails over any conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement entered into on or after the effective date of this section, but requires the board and the teachers’ labor organization to negotiate the implementation of the differentiated salary schedule for teachers and negotiate additional factors regarding teacher salaries, provided those factors are consistent with this section.
  • NEW 3311.79 Assignment of Teachers. Allows all teachers to apply for open positions.  Requires the formation of a building level team to conduct interviews of applicants prior to school opening and during the school year.  The team shall be chosen by the principal and the representative of the district’s teachers’ labor organizations, and shall include the building principal, a representative of the district teachers’ labor organization, a parent, a staff member in the same job classification as the posted position, and any other members mutually agreed upon by the principal and the labor organization representative. Specifies the credentials for hiring teachers, including the level and number of subject licenses; highly qualified status; results of teacher performance evaluations in subjects taught; specialized training or experience; and other credentials established. States that the building team recommendations shall be sent to the chief executive officer.  If the building team cannot come to consensus, the chief executive officer or designee can fill a teaching position based on the best interests of the district and the input from the building team. Allows the chief executive officer or designee to assign, reassign, or transfer a teacher after meeting with the teacher, principals of affected buildings, and representative from the teachers’ labor organization. States that seniority or a continuing contract status shall not be used as a primary factor in determining any teacher’s assignment to a school. States that this section prevails over conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement, but that the board and teachers’ labor organization shall negotiate regarding implementation of this section, including the processes by which each building level team conducts its interviews and makes recommendations.
  • NEW 3311.80 Teacher Evaluations.  Requires a municipal school district to comply with this Section rather than 3319.111 – teacher evaluations. Outlines certain conditions for an evaluation framework, which shall be adopted by the board of education and the teachers’ labor organization by July 1, 2013. States that the evaluation procedures shall describe how the evaluation results will be used for decisions regarding compensation, retention, promotion, and reductions in force and for removal of poorly performing teachers. Allows teachers to challenge any violation of the evaluation procedures in accordance with the grievance procedures specified in any applicable collective bargaining agreement.  A challenge under this division is limited to the determination of procedural errors that have resulted in substantive harm to the teacher. States that this section does not apply to substitute teachers employed for less than 120 days or to administrators appointed by the chief executive officers, and prevails over conflicting provisions of a collective bargaining agreement, but that the board and teachers’ labor organization may negotiate additional evaluation procedures.
  • NEW 3311.81  Teacher Contracts.  Defines limited and extended contracts for teachers in a municipal school district, and states that this section applies rather than 3319.11.  Requires that teachers who receive a written notice of the intention of the board not to re-employ such teacher pursuant to this division are entitled to the hearing provisions of division (C) of this section. The decision of the board shall be final and not subject to further appeal. States that this division prevails over any conflicting provision of a collective bargaining agreement, and the board and the teachers’ labor organization shall negotiate the due process procedures preceding a teacher’s receipt of a written notice indicating the intent of the board not to re-employ the teacher.
  • NEW 3311.82 Termination of Contracts and Disciplinary Suspension. Includes the procedures for the termination of a contract and disciplinary suspension of a teacher in a municipal school district, rather than through 3319.16 and 3319.161, but states that those sections shall apply to the district with respect to termination of contracts with other district employees licensed by the state board of education, subject to division (F) of section 3311.84 of the Revised Code.
  • NEW 3311.83 Suspension of Teacher Contracts/Reductions in Force. Includes the procedures for reductions in force of teachers in a municipal school district, rather than through 3319.16 and 3319.161, but states that those sections shall apply to the district with respect to termination of contracts with other district employees licensed by the state board of education, subject to division (F) of section 3311.84 of the Revised Code. Specifies that the reasons for reduction in force include:  1) Return to duty of regular teachers after leaves of absence, including leaves of absence provided pursuant to section 3319.13 or 3319.14 of the Revised Code; (2) Decreased enrollment of students in the district; 1922 (3) Academic reasons resulting in consolidation of teaching positions, duties, or functions or resulting in changes in educational programs; (4) Financial reasons; (5) Territorial changes affecting the district. Establishes in division (B) categories of teachers based on their type of contract and teacher evaluation status, and states that teachers will be reduced based on their category. Allows that teachers whose contracts are suspended by the board through this section have the right of restoration by the board. States that the board and the representative of the teachers’ labor organization shall negotiate how specialized training and experience will be factored into reduction in force and recall decisions and that additional factors to be considered in determining the order of reductions can be negotiated. After applying specialized training and experience and any other negotiated factors, teachers within the same category prescribed by division (B) of this section shall be given preference based on seniority.
  • NEW 3311.84 Evaluation of Principals.  Includes the procedures for evaluating principals and assistant principals, rather than through 3319.02, but states that all other provisions of that section shall apply to the district with respect to principals and assistant principals. Section 3319.02 of the Revised Code in its entirety shall apply to the district with respect to employees other than principals and assistant principals who are covered by that section, except as otherwise provided in section 3311.72 of the Revised Code. States that termination of a principal’s contract shall be in accordance with section 3319.16 of the Revised Code, except as follows: (1) Failure of the principal’s building to meet academic performance standards established by the chief executive officer shall be considered good and just cause for termination under that section. (2) If the chief executive officer intends to recommend to the board that the principal’s contract be terminated, the chief executive officer shall provide the principal a written copy of the principal’s evaluation at least five days prior to making the recommendation to the board.
  • NEW 3311.85 School Year.  Permits a board of education of a municipal school district to establish a school calendar for the district and one or more of the district’s school buildings that provides for additional student days beyond the minimum prescribed by law, or year-round instruction, or an extended school day. The calendar must comply with the minimum school year prescribed by section 3313.48 of the Revised Code. Requires the district board and teachers’ labor organization to negotiate regarding any additional compensation for school staff for an extended school day or school year.
  • NEW 3311.86 Transformation Alliance:  Defines the transformation alliance as a nonprofit corporation (under Chapter 1702) created for a municipal school district.  Defines partnering community school as a community school established under Chapter 3314 and is located within the territory of a municipal school district, and is sponsored by the district, receives services from the district, leases a building from the district, or is a party to an agreement with the district, whereby the district and the community school endorse each other’s programs. Defines “Transformation alliance education plan” as a plan prepared by the mayor and confirmed by the alliance, to transform public education in the alliance municipal school district, to a system of municipal school district schools and partnering community schools that will be held to the highest standards of school performance and student achievement. States that the mayor of a municipal school district may initiate proceedings to establish a municipal school district transformation alliance and appoint initial directors. The directors will represent the municipal school district; partnering community schools; members of the community at large, including parents and educators; and the business community, including business leaders and foundation leaders. The mayor shall be an ex officio director and chairperson of the board of directors. (C)(1) States that any formal action taken by the board of directors shall take place at a meeting of the board and shall require the concurrence of a majority of the members of the board. Meetings of the board of directors shall be public meetings open to the public at all times, except that the board may hold an executive session for any of the purposes for which an executive session of a public body is permitted under division (G) of section 121.22 of the Revised Code. (C)(1) Requires public notice of meetings and (C)(2) filing of all records with the department of education.  All records will be made available to the public according to Chapter 149 of the Revised Code. (D) Requires the transformation alliance to do the following: (1) Confirm and monitor implementation of the transformation alliance education plan (2) Suggest national education models and develop venues for the community and institutions within the territory of the alliance municipal school district to provide input in the development of new schools within the territory of the district (3) Work with the alliance municipal school district and partnering community schools to adopt a comprehensive, evidence-based framework to assess district and community schools and advocate for school performance accountability with the department of education. The alliance annually shall assess the performance of district schools and community schools using the framework adopted under this division. (4) Communicate school choices within the territory of the alliance municipal school district by publishing and making available to parents and guardians of students an annual report summarizing the alliance’s assessments of district and community school performance and providing, during the intradistrict open enrollment period under section 3313.97 of the Revised Code, information about educational choices (5) Assess community school growth and quality by applying national quality standards as they relate to the opening of community schools located within the territory of the alliance municipal school district or the closure of failing community schools located within the territory of the alliance municipal school district.
  • 3311.86 (E) States that this section applies to community schools created under section 3314.03 after the effective date of this section and located in an alliance municipal school district. Requires that a governing authority of a community school established under this section receive the approval from the alliance; requires persons considering the establishment of a community school under this section receive the approval from the alliance; requires that the governing authority and persons establishing a community school under this section file contracts and copies of agreements with the alliance. Requires the alliance with the Department of Education to establish criteria to approve community schools under this section. Includes a process to appeal denials to the Ohio Department of Education.
  • 3311.86 (F) States that “Directors, officers, and employees of an alliance are not public employees or public officials, are not subject to Chapters 124 (Department of Administrative Services), 145 (Retirement Fund), and ORC Section 4117 (Labor and Industry), and are not “public officials” or “public servants” as defined in section 2921.01 of the Revised Code. Membership on the board of directors of an alliance does not constitute the holding of an incompatible public office or employment in violation of any statutory or common law prohibition against the simultaneous holding of more than one public office or employment. Members of the board of directors of an alliance are not disqualified from holding any public office by reason of that membership, and do not forfeit by reason of that membership the public office or employment held when appointed to the board, notwithstanding any contrary disqualification or forfeiture requirement under the Revised Code or the common law of this state.
  • NEW 3313.412 Sale of Unused School Facilities:  Requires a municipal school district to offer unused academic facilities to its partnering community schools at a price that is not higher than the appraised fair market value of the property.  States the following: (G) “Notwithstanding division (F) of section 5705.10 of the Revised Code, if a school district board sells real property that it owns in its corporate capacity, moneys received from the sale may be paid into the general fund of the district, as long as the district has owned the real property for at least five years and the real property and any improvements to that real property were not acquired with the proceeds of public obligations, as defined in section 133.01 of the Revised Code, of the district that are outstanding at the time of the sale.”
  • NEW 3314.351 Conditions for Closure of a Community School Under Section 3311.71 (Municipal School District). (A)(1)Specifies the criteria that must be met to close a community school that is located within the territory of a municipal school district. (A)(2) States that this section does not apply to a community school in which a majority of the students are enrolled in a dropout prevention and recovery program that is operated by the school and that has been granted a waiver under section 3314.36 of the Revised Code; and any community school in which a majority of the enrolled students are children with disabilities receiving special education and related services in accordance with Chapter 3323 of the Revised Code.
  • 3314.36 Exemptions from Closure Provisions:  Exempts dropout prevention community schools from closure under Sections 3314.35 and 3314.351.
  • Section 5705.192 Taxing Authorities: 5705.192 (3) states that “In the case of an existing school district levy imposed under division (B) of section 5705.21, division (C) of section 5705.212, or division (J) of section 5705.218 of the Revised Code, the rates allocated to the municipal school district and to qualifying community schools each may be increased or decreased or remain the same, and the total rate may be increased, decreased, or remain the same.” (C) Requires that the form of a ballot be modified for the type of levy proposed by a municipal school district, to indicate the number of mills or the portion of the rate increased/reduced to be allocated to a qualifying community school.
  • Section 5705.21 Levy for Municipal School District and Qualifying Community Schools:  States that “The levy of a tax for the current expenses of a qualifying community school under this section and the distribution of proceeds from the tax by a municipal school district to qualifying community schools is a proper public purpose.” Requires a board of education of a municipal school district to approve a resolution to submit the question of an additional tax levy to the voters of the school district.  The resolution shall state the purpose of the levy, the rate of the tax expressed in mills per dollar of taxable value, the number of such mills to be levied for the current expenses of the qualifying community schools and the number of such mills to be levied for the current expenses of the school district, the number of years the tax will be levied, and the first year the tax will be levied. The number of years the tax may be levied may be any number not exceeding ten years, or for a continuing period of time.
  • Qualifying Community School Fund:  Requires the board of education of a municipal school district to establish a separate fund for the deposit of tax revenue raised for qualifying community schools under this section.
  • Resident student:  Defines a resident student as a student enrolled in a qualifying community school who is entitled to attend school in the municipal school district under section 3313.64 or 3313.65 of the Revised Code.
  • Distribution of Tax Revenue:  States that each qualifying community school shall receive a portion of the qualifying community schools amount in the proportion that the number of its resident students bears to the aggregate number of resident students of all such qualifying community schools as of the receipt and deposit of the tax distribution. For the purposes of this division, the number of resident students shall be the number of such students reported under section 3317.03 of the Revised Code and established by the department of education as of the receipt and deposit of the tax distribution.
  • Qualifications for State Aid:  States that, “The taxes charged and payable for the current expenses of qualifying community schools shall not affect the calculation of “state education aid” as defined in section 5751.20 of the Revised Code.”
  • Please Note:  Changes in several other sections of law are also included so that all new provisions align with law unchanged. Provisions refer to local taxation authorize combined levies (municipal school district and community schools) for permanent improvements or incremental levies, etc.

Redistricting Task Force Meets:  The Redistricting Task Force, co-chaired by Senator Keith Faber and Nina Turner met on April 26, 2012. The task force was created in HB369 (Huffman) and includes Senators Faber, Turner, Sawyer and LaRose; and Representatives Buchy, Huffman, Clyde, and Letson.

The task force is charged with developing the process of redrawing congressional lines by June 30, 2012. As a first step the task force will review current redistricting/apportionment proposals.  These include,

  • 128-HJR15:  A plan adopted by the House to revise the process for drawing General Assembly districts sponsored by Representative Tom Letson and former Representative Jennifer Garrison.
  • 129-HJR5:  A plan to revise both the congressional and General Assembly districts proposed by Representatives Ted Celeste and Mike Duffey and Senators Frank LaRose and Tom Sawyer.
  • 128-SJR5:  A the plan to revise the process for both the General Assembly and congressional districts sponsored by Secretary of State Jon Husted.

A proposed constitutional amendment for redrawing both General Assembly and congressional districts proposed by Voters First, a coalition of organizations, including the League of Women Voters of Ohio, Common Cause, and Ohio Citizen Action.

The Task Force is scheduled to meet again on Wednesday, May 16, 2012.

State and Local Governments Face Fiscal Challenges:  The Government Accounting Office released a report on April 2, 2012 entitled “State and Local Governments’ Fiscal Outlook April 2012 Update” (GAO-12-523SP).  According to the report, the fiscal outlook is improving for state and local governments as tax receipts have increased, but total tax receipts have only returned to pre-recession levels of 2007, and long-term fiscal challenges remain unless policies are changed. Tax receipts have increased nearly 11 percent between the second quarter of 2009 and the third quarter of 2011, with receipts from income and sales taxes accounting for most of the revenue growth. Property taxes grew slightly between 2009-2010, but have flattened as real estate values have remained depressed.

The continuing issue facing state and local governments is rising health-related costs for Medicaid and compensation for state and local government employees and retirees.  Without policy changes “state and local governments would face an increasing gap between receipts and expenditures in the coming years.”

The report states, “We calculated that closing the fiscal gap would require action to be taken today and maintained for each year equivalent to a 12.7 percent reduction in state and local government current expenditures.5 Closing the fiscal gap through revenue increases would require action on that side of a similar magnitude.”

Analysts used models based on the Bureau of Economic Analysis’ (BEA) National Income and Product Accounts to simulate long-term fiscal outlook for the state and local sector as a whole.  The models incorporate the Congressional Budget Office’s economic projections, and adjustments were made to capture the budgetary effects of near-term cyclical swings in the economy.

The report is available.
Organizations Support Resolution Opposing Testing: Several organizations and individuals have joined together to support a national resolution opposing high-stakes testing.  On April 23, 2012 more than 360 Texas boards of education signed the resolution, while in New York over 1,432 principals and 4,860 individuals have signed similar resolutions.

The resolution calls on governors, state legislatures, and state education boards and administrators to reexamine public school accountability systems, and develop accountability systems which do not require extensive standardized testing, more accurately reflect the broad range of student learning, and are used to support students and improve schools.

Furthermore, the resolution calls on the U.S. Congress and Administration to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (currently known as the “No Child Left Behind Act”), reduce the testing mandates, promote multiple forms of evidence of student learning and school quality in accountability, and not mandate any fixed role for the use of student test scores in evaluating educators.

The resolution and petition drive is supported by the Advancement Project; Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund; FairTest; Forum for Education and Democracy; MecklenburgACTS; Deborah Meier; NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.; National Education Association; New York Performance Standards Consortium; Tracy Novick; Parents Across America; Parents United for Responsible Education – Chicago; Diane Ravitch; Race to Nowhere; Time Out From Testing; and United Church of Christ Justice and Witness Ministries.

The resolution is available.

Bills Introduced:

  • HB525 (Williams/Amstutz) Municipal School Districts – Community Schools:  Revises the management of municipal school districts and community schools located within municipal school districts.
  • SB335 (Turner/Lehner) Municipal School Districts – Community Schools: Revises the management of municipal school districts and community schools located within municipal school districts.

FYI ARTS

2012 World Choir Games to be Held in Cincinnati:  The 2012 World Choir Games will be held July 4-14, 2012 in Cincinnati, Ohio.  The Games are the largest international choral competition in the world, and more than 360 choirs from 48 countries have registered to participate, including choirs representing 25 states and 80 choirs from the Cincinnati area. This is the first time that the Games will take place in the U.S.A. Previous games have been held in Austria, China, Germany, and South Korea.

The Games are organized by INTERKULTUR, based in Pohlheim, Germany. The Proctor and Gamble company is the presenting sponsor for the Games this year, and more than 315 corporations, foundations, organizations, and individuals have made donations to support the Games.

A resolution has been introduced in the Ohio Senate by Senator Shannon Jones (SCR14 – Jones S.) declaring July 2012 as World Choir Games Month and recognizing the 2012 World Choir Games in Cincinnati, Ohio, as a global event of cultural significance to Ohio and the U.S.More information about the World Choir Games is available.

ArtsEdSearch.org Clearinghouse for Arts Research:  The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) has created a clearinghouse for research and policy information regarding arts education in and out of school called ArtsEdSearch.org.  The clearinghouse allows researchers to access over 200 summaries of research studies by school type, including early childhood, elementary school, middle school, secondary school, postsecondary, and adult and lifelong learning, and by outcomes or settings. The site is available.

Congratulations!!! NEA Grants Announced:  The National Endowment for the Arts announced on April 25, 2012 the 928 recipients of $77.17 million in funding for arts programs to nonprofit organizations nationwide. The grants support projects in three categories:

  • Art Works supports the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and the strengthening of communities through the arts.
  • Arts in Media supports the development, production, and national distribution of innovative media projects about the arts and media projects that can be considered works of art.
  • Partnership Agreements extend the NEA’s reach and impact by providing support to the nation’s state arts agencies and regional arts organizations.

Ohio will receive 17 grants totaling $1,359,000.  The following is a list of the recipients and the amount awarded in Ohio:

  • Apollo’s Fire, The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra Cleveland Height, OH $25,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Music To support national tour performances, educational activities, and a radio broadcast of Come to the River: An Early American Gathering. The program, featuring singer-actors, a baroque/folk fiddler, a period guitarist/banjo player, a virtuoso hammered dulcimer player, an Irish/baroque flutist, percussive dancers, and a narrator/harpsichordist, will explore the music and traditions of early America including shape-note singing, New England barn dances, and southern revival hymns.
  • Cincinnati Association for the Performing Arts Cincinnati, OH $20,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Visual Arts To support an exhibition by Cincinnati-based multimedia artist Anthony Luensman (b. 1966) at the Weston Art Gallery in the Aronoff Center for the Arts. Luensman will create new work for the exhibition using sculpture, photography, video, and sound pieces based on themes of childhood, loss, and the evanescence of life. The exhibition — along with a gallery talk, educational workshop and performance — will be featured as part of FotoFocus, the first biennial month-long celebration of photography, film, and video organized by the Cincinnati Art Museum.
  • Cincinnati Opera Association Cincinnati, OH $30,000 CATEGORY: Arts in Media   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Media Arts To support the production of a documentary film by Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar, chronicling the creation of an American work of opera. The Opera Fusion: New Works program offers an environment where a composer/librettist team can focus on their new work using resources from Cincinnati Opera and students from the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati. The film is intended for national broadcasting and film screenings.
  • Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Cincinnati, OH $15,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Music To support free outdoor Concerts in the Park and related educational activities. Reaching venues in southwest Ohio, northern Kentucky, and southeast Indiana, the five community concerts will include educational activities for children and families, such as hands-on artmaking activities for children and pre-concert lectures with the conductor and musicians.
  • Cityfolk, Inc. Dayton, OH $40,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Folk and Traditional Arts  To support the 2012 Cityfolk Festival, an annual presentation of traditional music, dance, and visual arts. The project will feature leading traditional artists, including NEA National Heritage Fellow Mavis Staples, and a special exhibition, Folkways: Mexico, that will include performances, lecture-demonstrations, and workshops dedicated to the traditional arts of Mexico.
  • Cleveland Play House Cleveland, OH $20,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Theater To support the Classroom Matinee Touring Program. Components include a commissioned version of a main stage play designed for in-school performances, preparatory classroom workshops, and teacher and student education materials.
  • Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra Association Dayton, OH $25,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Music To support Classical Connections, a series of adult educational concerts. Accompanied by a Listener’s Guide, the first half of each concert will offer audiences an in-depth look into the music through discussion about and demonstration of important passages of a particular work and will be followed in the second half by a full performance of the work.
  • Design Impact Cincinnati, OH $39,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Design To support the American cohort of Design Impact designers. Designers are selected and paired with not-for-profit organizations in India to design solutions that improve access to basic needs, such as a clean water, shelter, or safe environments.
  • GroundWorks Dancetheater Cleveland, OH $20,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Dance To support guest artist residencies for New York choreographers Doug Elkins and Kate Weare. Portions of each residency will take place in Cleveland and Akron and include the creation and performance of a work as well as numerous outreach activities such as master classes, open rehearsals, artist talks, and educational programs at local schools.
  • Kent State University Main Campus Kent, OH $35,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Design To support an exhibition titled Shifting Paradigms of Identity: Creative Technology and Fashion, with related public programs at the Kent State University Museum. Project activities include an exhibition that examines the effects of pioneering applications of technology on fashion, accompanying lectures series, public workshops, and website.
  • Mayerson Foundation Cincinnati, OH $45,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Arts Education To support Artistic Excellence Program, weekly, year-round music, dance, visual art, and electronic media classes for high school students in the School for Creative & Performing Arts in Cincinnati. The program will include private lessons, ensemble coaching, master classes with visiting artists, and artists in residence from the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Ballet, and the Contemporary Arts Center.
  • Ohio Arts Council Columbus, OH $980,000 CATEGORY: Partnership   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: State & Regional To support Partnership Agreement activities.
  • Professional Flair, Inc. (aka The Dancing Wheels Company & School) Cleveland, OH $10,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Dance To support the commissioning of new works by choreographers David Rousseve and Michael Uthoff. The works will premiere in Cleveland in a program titled Diversity in Dance: The Dancing Wheels Company’s 32nd Season, and then will be excerpted for educational and touring purposes.
  • Thurber House, Inc. Columbus, OH $15,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Literature To support a summer writing camp for children in grades two through eight and writing workshops for older children and adults. Participants can focus on one topic or genre over a six-week period, or take different workshops each week on such issues as character development and writing for television.
  • University of Akron Main Campus Akron, OH $20,000 CATEGORY: Arts in Media   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Media Arts To support the development of the Synesthetic Augmented Reality Application (SARA).The application will allow users to translate visual images taken with their mobile devices into sonic compositions. Once developed, the application will be available through iTunes and the Android store, and will be presented at new media festivals.
  • University of Dayton Dayton, OH $10,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Research To support a study of the relationship between arts engagement and quality of life, as reflected by economic well-being and civic engagement patterns. The study will examine data from several waves of the Current Population Survey (CPS) and its Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) supplements in order to explore this relationship.
  • Westcott House Foundation (Consortium) Springfield, OH $10,000 CATEGORY: Art Works   FIELD/DISCIPLINE: Design To support the Westcott Design Studio targeted to high-school students. In collaboration with Springfield Preservation Alliance, the project will offer students an opportunity to interpret significant historical landmarks through digital media and produce new media artwork.
Advertisements

About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
This entry was posted in Arts On Line. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s