Arts On Line Update 09.12.2011

129th Ohio General Assembly:  The Ohio House has cancelled sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, but has scheduled a session on Thursday, September 15, 2011 to consider a bill (pending introduction) about congressional redistricting. The Ohio Senate has cancelled sessions for this week.  Both the House and Senate will hold committee hearings this week.

New Faces at the Statehouse:  Over the past few months several lawmakers have resigned from the Ohio House and Senate and new members have been appointed to complete their terms of office.  Most recently on September 9, 2011 Governor Kasich announced the appointment of Senator Tim Grendell (18th Senate District) to the Geauga County Court of Common Pleas Court effective September 21, 2011, which will leave another temporary open seat in the Ohio Senate. The following is a review of the recent changes at the Statehouse:

New to the Ohio Senate:
-20th Senate District:  Representative Troy Balderson (R-Zanesville – 94th House District) replaced Senator Jimmy Stewart -26th Senate District:  Representative Dave Burke (R-Marysville – 28th House District) replaced Senator Karen Gillmor

New to the Ohio House:
-94th House District:  Brian Hill (R-Zanesville) replaced Representative Troy Balderson -28th House District:  Dorothy Pelanda (R-Marysville) replaced Representative Dave Burke

Pending changes:
-30th House District:  Representative Robert Mecklenborg (R-Cincinnati) resigned.  The Ohio Republican Caucus is currently interviewing candidates for the seat.
-18th Senate District:  Senator Tim Grendell has been appointed to the Geauga County Court of Common Pleas effective September 21, 2011. No news yet about the process that the Senate will use to replace him.

Good Economic News:  The Office of Budget and Management, Tim Keen director, reports that August tax revenue at $1.55 billion is $67.4 million ahead of estimates. Total tax revenue for FY12 is $284 million higher than during the first two months of FY 2011.

Congressional District Plan to be Revealed Tuesday:  The House State Government & Elections Committee, chaired by Representative Huffman, will review and possibly vote on a legislative plan for re-configuring congressional districts on September 13, 2011. Due to the 2010 Census the number of congressional districts in Ohio must be reduced from 18 to 16.  Currently Republicans represent thirteen districts and Democrats five districts in Congress. The plan must be approved by the General Assembly soon to allow elections officials time to prepare for primary elections in the spring.  Separate legislation to move the Presidential Primary from March 2012 to May 2012 is also being considered.  Lawmakers approved that change in recently passed legislation, HB194 (Mechlenborg/Blessing), but that law will not go into effect, because it is being challenged through the referendum process.

State House and Senate districts in Ohio will also be re-configured as a result of the 2010 Census through a process led by the Apportionment Board, which consists of the governor, secretary of state, state auditor, and two legislative members from each party.

This Week at the Statehouse

Monday, September 12, 2011

The House Legislative Study Committee on Ohio Tax Structure, chaired by Representative Adams, will meet at 11:00 AM at the University of Toledo Scott Park Auditorium, 2225 Nebraska Ave, Toledo. The committee will receive testimony on the Commercial Activity Tax, tax expenditures, and sales and use taxes.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

The House State Government and Elections Committee, chaired by Representative Huffman, will meet at 1:30 PM in hearing room 313. Pending introduction and referral, the committee will hold hearings on legislation regarding  Congressional redistricting sponsored by Representative Huffman and legislation to change the spring primary election date, sponsored by Representatives Blessing and O’Brien.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee, chaired by Senator Faber will meet at 9:30 AM in the South Hearing Room. Pending introduction and referral, the committee will hear sponsor testimony on legislation sponsored by Senator Faber to move the date of the spring primary election.

The House State Government and Elections Committee, chaired by Representative Huffman, will meet at 1:45 PM or immediately after session in hearing room 313. Pending introduction and referral, the committee will hold hearings and a vote is possible on a congressional redistricting bill sponsored by Representative Huffman and legislation to change the spring primary election date sponsored by Representatives Blessing and O’Brien.

The House Ways and Means Committee, chaired by Representative Beck will meet at 3:30 PM in hearing room 114.  The committee will hear testimony on the following bills:
-HB242 (Brenner/Patmon) Tax Credits for Nonpublic Schools.  This legislation would authorize non-refundable tax credits for donations to nonprofit entities providing scholarships to low-income students enrolling in chartered nonpublic schools.
-HB258 (Grossman/Dovilla) Apprenticeship Programs.  This legislation would exempt from taxation for five years the earned income of an individual who obtains journey-person status or a baccalaureate degree and works in Ohio, and prohibits adopting standards stricter than federal regulations for apprenticeship programs.

The House Education Committee, chaired by Representative Stebelton, will meet at 5:00 PM in hearing room 017.  The committee will receive testimony on the following legislation:
-HB255 (Gonzales) School Breakfast Programs:  Requires school districts and community schools to establish school breakfast programs in academic emergency buildings, and makes other changes regarding school breakfast programs.
-HB211 (Adams) American History State Academic Standards: Includes content on specified historical documents in the state academic standards and in the high school American history and government curriculum.
-HB136 (Huffman) Parental Choice and Taxpayer Savings Scholarship Program: Replaces the Educational Choice and the Cleveland scholarship program with the Parental Choice and Taxpayer Savings Scholarship Program, and establishes the Special Education Scholarship Program.

Friday, September 16, 2011
The House Legislative Study Committee on Ohio Tax Structure, chaired by Representative Adams, will meet at 10:30 AM at University Akron Martin University Center, 105 Fir Hill St., Akron, OH.

News from Washington, D.C.

Back to School Bus Tour:  U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and officials from the U.S. Department of Education visited Ohio and other midwest states last week to promote “Education and the Economy” in a “back-to-school” bus tour of several schools and school districts.

While visiting Cleveland Secretary Duncan participated in a panel discussion about connecting community resources to the classroom, and while in Toledo Secretary Duncan met with teachers.

Senior officials of the U.S. Department of Education participated on September 6, 2011 in a meeting hosted by U.S. Representative Marcia Fudge with several school superintendents, and also visited several school districts and charter schools.

For information about these visits please see StateImpact Ohio, which covered the tour and interviewed Secretary Duncan.

Congress Returns from Summer Recess:  Lawmakers returned to Washington, D.C. last week to continue work on a number of education-related bills that have been stalled for months.  Lawmakers must still approve FY12 appropriations, which begin on October 1, 2011, and reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), known as the No Child Left Behind Act. Certain sanctions for school districts that do not meet adequate yearly progress will go into effect this year if Congress does not change the law or grant waivers from its provisions.

A new panel, dubbed the “supercommittee”, created in federal legislation to increase the debt ceiling, will also be meeting to find ways to cut the federal deficit.  The panel’s recommendations to reduce the federal deficit by $1.2 trillion over the next ten years are due November 23, 2011, and could affect FY12 appropriations and FY13 budget recommendations for education and the arts. Automatic cuts will be enacted if Congress and the President can’t agree on the supercommittee’s recommendations.

President Obama is also asking Congress to approve the American Jobs Act ($450 billion), which will be introduced this week.  According to a speech President Obama made before a joint session of Congress on September 8, 2011, the American Jobs Act will provide funds to prevent the layoff of up to 280,000 teachers; help keep police and firefighters on the job; support construction and renovation of school facilities; expand access to high-speed wireless; and more.

More information about the American Jobs Act is available.

State Board of Education to Meet:  The State Board of Education, Debe Terhar president, will meet on September 12 & 13, 2011 at the Ohio School for the Deaf, 500 Morse Rd, Columbus, OH.

On Monday, September 12, 2011, the Executive Committee of the State Board of Education will meet at 8:45 AM.  The committee will discuss the concept of having a student member on the State Board of Education; discuss the October retreat; discuss the NASBE slate of officers; and recommended changes to NASBE’s positions on public education.

The Legislative and Budget Committee and Technology and Education Systems Committees will meet at 9:30 AM.

The Legislative and Budget Committee, chaired by C.Todd Jones, will discuss the proposed federal platform and receive an update on pending legislation.

The Technology and Education Systems Committee, chaired by Dennis Shelton, will receive an update from John Childs, interim chief operating officer and receive updates about eTranscripts, student record exchange, IIS, and EMIS-R.

At 11:00 AM the Board will recognize distinguished school administrators who have been selected by their professional associations to receive the following awards:

Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA) Betsy Cowles Award – Deborah S.  Delisle

Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA) – Superintendent of the Year –  Dr. Philip Price, Mayfield Heights City School (Cuyahoga County)

Distinguished Principals of the Year:

-Ohio Association of Secondary School Administrators (OASSA) – Secondary Principal of the Year – Roger Howard, Independence High School (Cuyahoga County)

-Ohio Association of Elementary School Administrators (OAESA) – Distinguished Elementary Principal of the Year – Teresa Anderson, High Street Primary (Piqua, Miami County)

-Ohio Association of Elementary School Administrators (OAESA) – Distinguished Middle School Principal of the Year – Heidi Kegley, Willis Intermediate School (Delaware, Delaware County)

-Ohio Association of Secondary School Administrators (OASSA) – Middle School Principal of the Year – Matthew Lutz, formerly Walnut Springs Middle School (Westerville, Franklin County), currently Executive Director of Education for the Mid-Ohio Educational Service Center (MOESC).

After lunch at 1:00 PM the Achievement, Capacity, and Select Committee on Urban Education committees will meet.

The Achievement Committee, chaired by Angela Thi Bennett, will consider the following:
-Discuss and approve a resolution of intent to adopt Rule 3301-16-02, Honors Diploma -Discuss and approve a resolution of intent to adopt Rule 3301-16-03, Community Service Learning -Discuss SB 210 – Healthy Choices for Healthy Children’s Act -Discuss a performance indicator for gifted education -Discuss and approve a resolution of intent to rescind Rule 3301-61-14, Provisions for the career-technical education construction and equipment loan fund.

The Capacity Committee, chaired by Tom Gunlock, will consider the following:
-Discuss the Diversity Strategies Policy Implementation Plan -Discuss proposed amending of Rule 3301-24-18, Resident Educator License -Discuss proposed new Rules 3301-101-01 to -12, Peterson Special Education Scholarship Program -Discuss proposed rescission of Rules 3301-104-01 to -03, Expenditures for Computer or Internet Based Schools -Discuss proposed amending of Rules 3301-11-01 to -04, -07, Ed Choice

The Selected Committee on Urban Education, chaired by Joe Farmer, will consider the following:
-Review and discuss a presentation from the Office of Accountability on the performance of urban districts on the 2011 LRC -Review and discuss a presentation from the Office of School Options on EdChoice and Community School performance

The full Board will convene at 2:45 PM to receive a presentation about the 2011 State Report Cards.

Board members will present reports at 3:45 PM, and a 119 hearing on ORC Rules 3301-24-04, Entry Year Program, will be conducted at 4:00 PM.

The Board will then adjourn.

Meeting on Tuesday, September 13, 2011

The State Board meeting will begin at 8:30 AM with an executive session.

At 10:00 AM the Board will convene and receive a presentation from Bob Sommers, Director of the Governor’s Office of 21st Century Education and Barbara Mattei-Smith, Assistant Policy Director, Governor’s Education Office, about a new funding model for education.

At 11:30 AM the Board will convene its business meeting, which includes the swearing-in of Stan Heffner, State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The Board will then receive reports from committees; receive the report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction; receive public participation on agenda items, and vote on the report and recommendations of the Superintendent.  The report and recommendations are listed below.

The Board will then consider old business, new business, miscellaneous business, receive public participation on non-agenda items, and adjourn.

September 2011 Report and Recommendations of the Superintendent of Public Instruction
#8 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-16-02 of the Administrative Code entitled establishing criteria for awarding the diploma with honors.
#9 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Adopt Rule 3301-16-03 of the Administrative Code entitled community service learning
#10 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Rescind Rule 3301-61-14 of the Administrative Code entitled Rule for the Provisions for the Career-Technical Education Construction and Equipment Loan Fund.
#11 Approve a Resolution to deny the proposed transfer of school district territory from the Hilliard City School District, Franklin County, to the Dublin City School District, Franklin County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.
#12 Approve a Resolution to deny the proposed transfer of school district territory from the Plain Local School District, Stark County, to the North Canton City School District, Stark County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.
#20 Approve a Resolution to confirm the findings of the Ohio Department of Education for the revocation of the approval of the Ashe Cultrue Center to sponsor community schools.

NCES Report Compares State Proficiency Standards to NAEP: The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) released on August 10, 2011 “Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto the NAEP Scales:
Validation and Change in State Standards for Reading and Mathematics, 2005-2009” by Victor Bandeira de Mello.  This report is the most recent comparison of state standards for proficiency in reading and mathematics and scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

According to NCES, “The process of state mapping shows where each state’s standards lie on the NAEP scale, providing important contributions to analysis.”  For example, this analysis found that there is still wide variation among state proficiency standards (71 points between Massachusetts and Tennessee in 8th grade math) and more states’ proficiency standards are at or below NAEP’s definition of Basic performance. Although eight states increased the rigor of their passing marks on standardized exams between 2007 and 2009, when compared to the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), the standards of these states and most others are still much lower than those at the federal level. For example, in 8th grade reading, 16 states set standards for proficiency lower than the NAEP basic level, and no states matched NAEP proficient level.  In 8th grade mathematics, the proficiency levels of 12 states were lower than the NAEP basic category, and 36 states were within the basic category. Only the standards for Massachusetts were within the NAEP proficient range.

The National Center for Education Statistics began comparing states’ measurements for student achievement based on NAEP’s 500-point scale in 2003 to provide states, which are permitted to use their own state assessments and standards for proficiency through the No Child Left Behind Act, with a way to track the rigor of state standards and how state standards have improved over time.

The following information was provided about Ohio’s standards in the NCES report:

  • 4th grade reading standard:  Ohio’s proficiency standard was below basic for grade 4 reading (190) when classified into NAEP achievement levels. No states achieved the NAEP proficient standard.
  • 8th grade reading standard:  Ohio’s proficiency standard was basic for grade 8 reading (255) when classified into NAEP achievement levels.  No state achieved the NAEP proficient standard.
  • 4th grade mathematics standard:  Ohio’s proficiency standard was basic for grade 4 mathematics (220) when classified into NAEP achievement levels.  Massachusetts achieved a proficient level.
  • 8th grade mathematics standard:  Ohio’s proficiency standard was basic for grade 8 mathematics (265) when classified into NAEP achievement levels.  Massachusetts achieved a proficient level.

The report is available.

Report Analyzes State Funding for Schools: The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities released on September 9, 2011 a new report entitled, “New School Year Brings Steep Cuts in State Funding for Schools” by Phil Oliff and Michael Leachman.  The report notes that state funding for schools in 21 out of 24 states, in which data are available, is now below pre-recession levels, and the shortfall in some states exceeds 10 percent. South Carolina, Arizona, and California have reduced per student funding for K-12 education by more than 20 percent.

Ohio’s reduction in state funding per pupil is 2.2 percent from FY08 to FY12, which equates to approximately $89 per student, adjusted for inflation. However, the per student percent change from FY11 to FY12 is 9.1 percent, which equates to $399 per student, adjusted for inflation.

The report also includes information about the number of education jobs lost nationally.  From August 2008 to August 2009 there were 44,000 education jobs lost; from August 2009 to August 2010 there were 56,000 education jobs lost; and from August 2010 to August 2011 there were 194,000 education jobs lost.

The authors write, “The analysis illustrates the continuing effect on state-funded services like education of the 2007-09 recession and slow recovery. The failure of the federal government to extend emergency fiscal aid to states and school districts and the failure of most states to enact needed revenue increases have exacerbated the cuts.”

The budget cuts will impact the national economy and the quality of the education programs for students.  The report notes that the economic recovery will be undermined by the loss of the purchasing power of schools and of the individuals who have been laid off, and the budget reductions will undermine education reform initiatives for lower achieving students and the overall quality and comprehensiveness of the education program offered for all students.

Reductions in state funding for education also put pressure on communities to increase local revenues to support schools.  However, the “precipitous decline in property values since the start of the recession” makes it impractical for some localities to increase local revenues for schools.

The report notes that a few states are increasing funding for education, including Alaska, Montana, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Iowa. The state economies of Alaska and Montana have not been affected by the recession compared to other states, while policy-makers in Maryland, Iowa, and Massachusetts have agreed to maintain the current funding levels for education in spite of the economic downturn. In Massachusetts and Maryland, for example, lawmakers have increased state revenues to ensure that funding for schools is maintained at current levels.

The full report is available.

Update from the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Arts Task Force: The National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Arts Task Force and guests met on August 30, 2011 in Reston, VA. (For a complete list of attendees please go to http://nccas.wikispaces.com/)

The task force consists of representatives of State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE) and representatives of the Arts Education Partnership, the American Alliance for Theatre and Education, the Educational Theatre Association, the National Arts Education Association, the National Association for Music Education, the National Dance Education Organization, and The College Board.

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) brought SEADAE and other arts leaders together in May 2010 to plan how to revise national arts education standards.  SEADAE was already engaged in the National Expectations for Learning in Arts Education, a comprehensive project that encompasses standards in the arts, curriculum, assessments, professional development, and leadership.  At the May 2010 meeting participants agreed that revising standards in the arts was a priority, and formed the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) to become the “work-horse and decision-making” body to revise the national standards. Committees were created for governance, communication, development, and research, and The College Board was asked to conduct research to support the work of the NCCAS.

The agenda of the August 30, 2011 meeting included the following:

An update of the history of NCCAS presented by Marcia McCaffrey, New Hampshire Department of Education/SEADAE.

An overview of the current status of arts education standards gathered through a survey of states. The survey results were presented by Lynn Tuttle, Arizona Department of Education/SEADAE.  Thirty-nine of the forty-one states with Arts Education Directors responded to the survey. (Ohio did not participate.) The survey found that 93 percent of states have arts standards in all arts disciplines, and ten percent of states include media arts as a separate discipline. More than half (54 percent) of states reported that they did not know when their state standards in the arts would be revised, but eight states reported that their standards for the arts would be revised in 2011. (Ohio and Texas are currently revising their standards for the arts.) Seventy-two percent of states said that they would be willing to postpone revision until the national standards in the arts were completed.

Most states reported that they would like to see the standards address the four arts disciplines; 21st Century Skills; interdisciplinary arts learning; and arts integration with non-arts areas.  Less than half of the states reported that they would like the standards to address arts and humanities (25 percent); media arts as a discrete discipline area (33 percent); and media arts embedded in the four disciplines (45 percent).

States also reported that the standards should address measurable benchmarks and assessments; 21st Century Skills; the four arts disciplines; K-12 articulation; include preK; and consider college readiness.

The data from the state survey can be found.

A presentation about two research reports prepared by The College Board and presented by Nancy Rubino and Amy Charleroy.

A review of Understanding by Design led by Debora Hansen, Delaware State Department of Education.

A discussion about the pros and cons for using a conceptual framework to organize the revision of the standards.  The purpose of the framework would be to give structure to learning and define the over-arching concepts that help teachers instruct and students learn. Some examples of conceptual frameworks were provided.  For example, the conceptual framework used by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is create, perform, and respond to the arts; Australia:  generating, realizing, and responding to the arts; and 21st Century Skills: communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration. The group prepared a document that included the advantages and challenges of using a conceptual framework.  The document is available.

A review and update of details that should be included in the next generation of arts standards.  This document was first developed in March 2011 and was revised at the August meeting.  The following nine details have been agreed upon:

1.National Arts Standards should extend PreK-14.
2.National Arts Standards should include Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings. At least some of these will be shared across art forms.
3.National Arts Standards should help teachers focus their work, rather than providing an unrealistically broad scope.
4.National Arts Standards should explicitly reflect embedded 21st century skills
5.National Arts Standards should be based on the expectation that students, regardless of later elective choices, learn a common body of skills/content in each art form PreK-8.
6.National Arts Standards should be grade-by-grade from PreK-8 in music, visual arts, theatre, and dance. National Arts Standards should be differentiated for electives (based on National Center for Educational Statistics course codes).
7.With the help of higher education/research colleagues including College Board, we should base grade level (or possible cluster) expectations on what research reveals students can do when provided with quality instruction over time.
8.We should validate National Arts Standards’ research-base by examining student work uploaded by skilled teachers – that demonstrate what well-taught children actually do, and also provide the basis for benchmarking (anchor sets), pre-service and in-service teacher training.

The full document can be viewed at http://nccas.wikispaces.com.

A discussion of media arts and how they fit into the national arts standards.  The task force determined that NCCAS should hold another session to further discuss and define media arts and how media arts should be represented in the standards for the arts.

Next Steps

Participants agreed to the following next steps:
-The NCCAS Framework Committee will create a foundational document to guide the next stage of the work to revise the standards. It was suggested that the committee include the chairs of each of the designated standards writing teams. The framework will be approved by NCCAS Leadership at a meeting on November 1 & 2, 2011 meeting between NCCAS and the states as represented by twenty-five Arts Education Directors from the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education.

The following is a timeline explaining the next steps:

September 2011: NCCAS hires a Project Director (The deadline to accept applicants for the position was August 26, 2011.) November 2011:  National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) issues guiding principles in the form of a conceptual framework December, 2011: NCCAS establishes the standards writing teams January 2012-June, 2012:  The Project Director manages the writing and revision of Standards draft. July, 2012:  NCCAS releases a of draft version of revised standards document for gathering public comment. September – November 2012: NCCAS reviews and responds to revised arts standards public comment; revisions are made to standards by writing teams led by Project Director. December, 2012: Release of revised arts standards.

Follow the progress of this work.

College Board Releases Reports on Arts Education:  The College Board, in partnership with the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS), released on August 26, 2011 two new research reports, described below, designed to support the revision of the National Arts Education Standards.

The College Board expects to release two additional reports in the near future: one focusing on college level arts standards benchmarks, including expectations of students enrolled in non-major arts courses, and a comprehensive review of preK-12 arts education and child development, including practices that address students’ cognitive, social, and emotional needs.

International Arts Education Standards: A Survey of the Arts Education Standards and Practices of Fifteen Countries and Regions.  This report compiles and analyzes information on the arts education standards of fifteen countries/regions selected by members of the NCCAS: Australia, Austria, China, Finland, Ireland, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Scotland, Singapore, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States, and Venezuela. (Although Venezuela was included the researchers found that it does not have published standards.)

The analysis found that all countries (except Venezuela) include standards for music and visual arts, and address the developmental levels of children by structuring their national arts standards in bands or levels according to the age and/or grade levels of students. Six of the countries also published standards for theatre education and four published standards for dance.

The analysis also shows a high degree of similarity in the learning goals and skill requirements for students among the standards.  Although language differs among the countries, the broad concepts of generating, realizing, and responding to the arts are included in all of the standards for the arts. Secondary goals for arts education are also noted, such as awareness of cultural institutions, events, and professional artists; cross-curricular connections with literacy, math, social studies; information and communication technology, and media arts; visual culture; development of social skills; national cultural heritage; professional opportunities; and environmental awareness.

The report also includes information about how different countries approach assessment through their arts standards.  The researchers found that Canada, New Zealand, and Singapore provide the most thorough assessment strategies and criteria.

The full report is available at http://nccas.wikispaces.com.

Arts Education Standards and 21st Century Skills:  An Analysis of the National Standards for Arts Education (1994) As Compared to the 21st Century Skills Map for the Arts.

The National Consortium of National Arts Education Associations released in 1994 the National Standards for Arts Education.  This was the first time that arts educators presented what students should know, understand, and be able to do in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts in grades K-12.

In 2010 members of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS), working with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, released the 21st Century Skills Map in the Arts. The map defines the ways in which each of 13 skills identified by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills are represented through study of the arts.

This report provides an analysis of the level of alignment between the current arts content standards and the skills; lesson examples; and outcomes included in the P21 Arts Map, across three grade bands in the disciplines of music, dance, visual art, and theatre.

This work anticipates that alignment with 21st century skills will be a fundamental aspect of the next generation of arts standards.

The following is a summary from the report about how 21st Century Skills align with standards for the arts.  (Please note: The report also includes the reverse:  how standards for the arts align with 21st Century Skills):

Dance:  Researchers found that the 21st Century Skills that most aligned with the National Standards for Dance were Critical Thinking/Problem Solving and Communication, both of which matched 19 out of 21 standards, and Innovation, which aligned with 16 standards.

The 21st Century Skills that least aligned with the National Standards for Dance were Leadership and Responsibility, which aligned with seven of the dance standards; Collaboration, which aligned with five standards; and Information, Communication, and Technology Literacy, which aligned with two.

Music:  Researchers found that the 21st Century Skills that most aligned with the National Standards for Music were Communication, which aligned with 24 out of 27 standards; Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, which aligned with 17 standards; and Flexibility and Adaptability, which aligned with 15 of the standards.

The 21st Century Skills that least aligned with the National Standards for Music were Innovation, which aligned with 6 music standards; Information, Communication, and Technology Literacy, which aligned with 3 standards; and Media Literacy, which aligned with one of the standards.

Theatre:  Researchers found that the 21st Century Skills that most aligned with the National Standards for Theatre were Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, which aligned with 22 out of 24 standards; Communication, which aligned with 20 standards; and Creativity, which aligned with 16 standards.

The 21st Century Skills that least aligned with the National Standards for Theatre were Information Literacy, which aligned with 4 of the theatre standards; and Productivity and Accountability and Information, Communication, and Technology Literacy, each of which aligned with 3 standards.

Visual Art:  Researchers found that there were five 21st Century Skills that aligned with 17 of the 18 National Standards for Visual Art. They are: Communication, Innovation, Creativity, Information Literacy, and Media Literacy.

There was a similar tie among the 21st Century Skills that least aligned with the National Standards for Visual Art. Collaboration, Productivity and Accountability, and Leadership and Responsibility all had zero positive alignments to the standards.

Overall the researchers also found alignment between the central goals that guided the development of the 1994 standards and the key 21st Century Skills.

To view the entire report please visit the NCCAS wiki page at http://nccas.wikispaces.com.

Find out more about the College Board’s initiatives related to arts education, including advocacy for arts education.

FYI Arts

Kanako Shimasaki Performs a Solo with the National Summer Music Institute Orchestra:  Congratulations to Kanako Shimasaki – Ohio’s representative to the National Symphony Orchestra National Trustees’ Summer Music Institute.  Ms. Shimasaki won a competition during the Summer Music Institute and the honor to perform a solo with the National Summer Music Institute Orchestra on July 24, 2011 at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Approximately 70 students (ages 15-20) from across the country participate in the Summer Music Institute each year. The students are selected to participate by a state arts organization in their state. In Ohio the organization is the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education. The Institute includes four weeks of private lessons, rehearsals, coaching by the National Symphony Orchestra members, classes, and lectures, and culminates with performances on the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Ms. Shimasaki performed the first movement of Barber’s Violin Concerto and then the Brahms Symphony #4 with the orchestra.  This is the forth summer in which Ms. Shimasaki has participated in the Summer Institute.  She plans to enter the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music in the fall. Please watch her performance.

AND….congratulations to all of the students-members of the National Summer Music Institute Orchestra for their outstanding performances at the Kennedy Center this past summer!!!

OSU Band Director to Retire:  OSU President E. Gordon Gee announced on September 3, 2011 that Ohio State University Band Director Jon Woods would be retiring at the end of the 2011-12 academic year.  Dr. Woods has directed the Ohio State University Marching Band for the last 25 years, and has had the longest tenure as full-time director of the band. Dr. Woods also serves as administrative coordinator and conductor of all athletic bands, which provide music and support for various campus sporting events. He is also a professor of music education in the School of Music, where he teaches and advises graduate students, and supervises student teachers. Assistant band director Jonathan Waters will become interim director in 2012-13. Dr. Waters, a former band member, has served as assistant director since 2002. The University plans several events in honor of Dr. Woods over the next year to celebrate his outstanding career.

AFA Blog Salon:  During National Arts in Education Week, September 12-16, 2011, Americans for the Arts will host a blog salon about career development and the role of arts education in the economy. The blog salon will feature posts by prominent arts education leaders throughout the week. Follow the salon by using the tag: September 2011 Salon, which will go live on September 12. Join in the discussion by adding comments.

The College Board Award for the Arts:  The College Board Award for Excellence and Innovation in the Arts recognizes and celebrates the achievements of six member institutions that have implemented an arts program that promotes student learning and creativity in exemplary and innovative ways. One school from each of The College Board’s six regions will be awarded $3,500 to support the continuation and growth of their arts programs. For information about how to apply for the award, please visit https://artsaward.collegeboard.org

AFA Campaign Focuses on Business/Arts: Americans for the Arts’ new campaign, The pARTnership Movement, focuses on how the business community can partner with the arts to build a competitive advantage. A webinar will be presented on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 3:00 PM EDT to explain the components of the campaign to increase local partnerships with the businesses community, media, and business associations. The moderator will be Mara Walker, Chief Operating Officer, Americans for the Arts.  Presenters include Emily Peck, Director of Private Sector Initiatives, Americans for the Arts; Will Maitland Weiss, Executive Director, Arts & Business Council of NY; and Chris Ebmeyer, Account Manager, Machinery, a strategic and creative boutique.  Learn how you can participate.

Exhibit Promotes the Value of Arts Education:  A new arts education exhibit opened on September 6, 2011 at Chicago’s Jane Addams Hull House Museum. The exhibition, “Unfinished Business: Arts Education” is a community curated exhibit that explores the necessity of arts education in schools and communities. The exhibit has several interactive aspects that include weaving and postcard printing. It will also feature interviews with Chicago artists and a detailed history of arts education pioneers. “Unfinished Business” is expected to run for one year. More information about the exhibit is available.

Massachusetts to Implement Arts Assessments: According to the Massachusetts Art Education Association, the Hunt Alternative Fund recently awarded Arts|Learning (A|L) a $15,000 grant to develop arts education assessments in Massachusetts public schools.  Arts|Learning will be working in partnership with the Connecticut Department of Education and Dr. Scott Shuler, who has developed model performance-based assessments in music and visual art in grades 2, 5, and 8. Also partnering in this project are the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) and the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

Implementation of these assessments will be optional in Massachusetts schools.  However, new teacher evaluation regulations in Massachusetts require that all teachers be able to show student learning, and this project will provide teachers and their administrators a useful tool to accomplish this task.

According the Massachusetts Art Education Association, the implementation of the Common Arts Assessments in Connecticut has had a strong impact on improving program quality and resources, and teachers have reported that administering these arts assessments has enabled them to leverage additional resources in their schools to ensure that their students achieve standards in the arts.

More information is available.

Gravity’s Ripple III: Outdoor Contemporary Dance Performances On Sept. 16-17 Dublin Arts Council and OhioDance will present Gravity’s Ripple III, an original, site-specific outdoor contemporary dance project in collaboration with The Ohio State University Department of Dance and Ohio Department of Education Division of the Arts.

Free public performances:

Friday, September 16, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. watch a dress rehearsal

Friday, September 16, 2011 6:30 p.m.

Saturday, September 17, 2011 6:30 p.m., final performances at Dublin Arts Council, 7125 Riverside Dr., in Dublin.

The approximate 40-minute performance, inspired by the rolling hills of the site and the Scioto River, will be followed by a question and answer session between Keely Shaffer-Glenn, the choreographer, the dancers and the audience.

For more information about Gravity’s Ripple III or any of Dublin Arts Council’s programs, exhibitions and events call (614) 889-7444 or visit www.dublinarts.org. Dublin Arts Council (DAC), is located at 7125 Riverside Dr. in Dublin, Ohio.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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One Response to Arts On Line Update 09.12.2011

  1. Congratulations to those officials who have supported the arts and have been elected in Ohio! There are such tremendous gains for students when art is a significant part of their program. In addition to the many qualities of creativity, it is my belief that art education also transfers to academic disciplines. Which ought to be an important factor for those educators to know who want to eliminate art from elementary schools.

    I’m retired now but taught for many years. In my combined first and second grade classes, children freely participated in the art center during Choice Time. (The same
    approach had been included in nursery school through third grades.) Readily available supplies were bought with school money and parents supplied a huge variety of junk materials. Much of art for the young child involves exploring a wide range of materials. It should include the process that is emphasized. During this process, children have opportunities to develop the very same cognitive traits necessary to succeed in academic areas. Opportunities for attaining academic success through art in school is not apt to be found in any other school activities.

    See my 2 entries about an art center for young children:

    http://peggybroadbent.com/blog/index.php?s=Children%27s+Explorations+in+an+Art+Center
    http://peggybroadbent.com/blog/index.php?s=Young+Children%27s+Cognitive+Gains+Through+Art

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