Arts On Line Update – 3.21.2011

129th Ohio General Assembly:  The Ohio House and Senate will hold sessions and committee hearings this week.  The Senate Education Committee will also meet. Hearings on the Biennial Budget (HB153 – Amstutz) will be held by the House Finance and Appropriations Committee.  There are no hearings this week on SB5 (Jones) Collective Bargaining.  The committee is working on amendments and expects to consider the bill for passage next week.

Budget Debate Begins:  Governor Kasich and Tim Keen, director of the Office of Budget and (OBM), held a news conference on March 15, 2011 to introduce HB153 (Amstutz), the FY12-13 state budget proposal, entitled The Jobs Budget.  The budget language was not ready to be introduced on March 15th, and so HB153 will serve as a placeholder until the actual language of the bill is available in the next few weeks.

The OBM released on March 15, 2011 several documents, referred to the “Blue Books”, that provide the priorities and goals of the proposed state budget, and funding levels for departments and agencies.

According to those documents, the proposed FY12-13 budget includes $59.3 billion in FY12 and $60.1 billion in FY13 for All Funds, and $26.8 in FY12 and $28.6 in FY13 for General Revenue Funds.  More details about the proposed budget are available at # 4,5,6, and 7 below.

Superintendent Delisle Resigns:  Superintendent of Public Instruction, Deborah Delisle, submitted to the State Board of Education on March 15, 2011 her resignation effective April 30, 2011. The State Board of Education has directed Board leadership to propose a response to the circumstances of the resignation and a process to select the next superintendent.

The Senate approved on March 16, 2011 SB71 (Manning) Municipally Owned Facilities.  This bill gives tax breaks to municipally-owned stadiums that house independent and non-affiliated sport teams. The bill does not require school districts to agree to the tax breaks, even though school districts could lose revenue as a result of the tax break.

The Ohio House concurred on March 16, 2011 with Senate amendments to HB30 (Gardner) School Funding. The bill includes the following provisions:

  • eliminates spending and reporting requirements related to the school funding system
  • eliminates the prohibition on unit funding for gifted student services effective after fiscal year 2011
  • eliminates the requirement that school districts offer all-day kindergarten
  • eliminates the requirement that school districts annually set aside operating funds for textbooks and instructional materials,
  • eliminates the requirement that school districts establish family and civic engagement teams except as required for implementation of federal “Race to the Top” grants

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, reported out favorably on March 15, 2011 SB81 (Cates) Teach for America, which qualifies Teach for America participants for a resident educator license in Ohio.

This week at the Statehouse

MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2011
House Finance and Appropriations Committee: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet at 1:00 PM in hearing room 313 and receive testimony from Gary Mohr, director of the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction and Martha Spohn, interim director of the Department of Youth Services on HB153 Biennial Budget (Amstutz).

TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2011
House Finance and Appropriations Committee: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet at 9:00 AM in hearing room 313 and reconvene at 1:00 PM and receive testimony on HB153 Biennial Budget (Amstutz) from the Governor’s Office of 21st Century Education; the Department of Education, and the Board of Regents.  The committee will also receive testimony on HB123 Worker’s Compensation Budget (Hottinger); HB124 Industrial Commission budget (Hottinger); and SB4 (Schaffer) Performance Audits of State Agencies.

Senate Education Committee: The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet at 9:30 AM in the South Hearing Room. The committee will receive testimony on the following bills:

  • HB36 (Kozlowski) Calamity Days, which would excuse up to five, instead of three, calamity days for the 2011-11 school year, to broaden schools’ authority to make up calamity days by lengthening remaining days in the school year, and to declare an emergency.
  • SB15 (Turner) Education Performance Standards Dropout: Requires the State Board of Education to recommend performance standards for dropout programs operated by school districts.
  • SB86 (Sawyer) Community School – DYS Adults:  Permits the establishment of a community school to serve adults of school age who are incarcerated or who have been released from the custody of the Department of Youth Services, and declares an emergency.

House Health and Aging Retirement and Pensions Subcommittee: The House Health and Aging Retirement and Pensions Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Kirk Schuring, will meet at 7:00 PM in room 018 to receive testimony on HB69 (Wachtmann) State Retirement Systems.

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2011
House Finance and Appropriations Committee: The House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz, will meet at 9:00 PM in hearing room 313 and reconvene at 1:00 PM if needed to receive testimony on HB153 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget.

House Health and Aging, Retirement, and Pensions Subcommittee: The House Health and Aging Retirement and Pensions Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Kirk Schuring, will meet at 2:30 PM in room 018 to receive testimony on HB69 (Wachtmann) State Retirement Systems.

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2011
House Primary and Secondary Education Committee: The House Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Carey, will meet at 9:30 AM in hearing room 114 and reconvene at 1:00 PM.  The committee will receive testimony on HB153 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget.

News from Washington, D.C.: Continuing Resolution, Again:  President Obama signed into law on March 18, 2011 the sixth continuing resolution (H.J. Res. 48) for FY11 to maintain funding for government agencies and departments through April 8, 2011.  This resolution reduced government spending another $6 billion, by eliminating 50 earmarked programs and some programs that were targeted for elimination by the President in his proposed budget for FY12.

NCLB Topic of President’s Speech:  President Obama urged lawmakers to reauthorize the No Child Left Behind Act before the next school year begins (fall 2011) in a speech on March 14, 2011 at Kenmore Middle School in Arlington, Va., The President identified several problems with NCLB, and recommended that the law include improved measures of success to reward schools for progress; improved standards to prepare students for college and careers; better assessments to demonstrate student progress and higher-level thinking skills; accountability measures that encourage student creativity; and improve teacher quality.

Ohio to Receive Federal Grant for Low-Achieving Schools:  U.S. Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, announced on March 17, 2011 that Ohio was one of five states that would be receiving $19.5 million through the federal School Improvement Grant (SIG) Program. The funds are a part of a $546 million grant program made available to states for FY10. The $19.5 million is being distributed by formula to the state.  Schools will be able to apply for the grants through a competitive process in the spring. As a part of the application, school districts must indicate which of the four school intervention models will be implemented in each of the lowest-achieving schools that are receiving the federal funds. The intervention models are Turnaround Model; Restart Model; School Closure; and Transformation Model.

Information about Ohio’s application is available.

The Jobs Budget Introduced: Governor Kasich introduced his administration’s FY12-13 budget, HB153 (Amstuzt), entitled “The Jobs Budget”, on March 15, 2011. HB153 is a place-holder until the actual language of the bill is available, which will be sometime over the next few weeks.  Information about the budget is available in documents called “Blue Books” prepared by the Office of Budget and Management (OMB), Tim Keen director, and available at http://obm.ohio.gov/.  A print-out with state aid for each school district is expected to be available soon.  Hearings on the Jobs Budget has already begun in House Finance and Appropriations Committee, chaired by Representative Amstutz.

JOBS BUDGET OVERVIEW

The FY12-13 proposed Jobs Budget includes funding levels for state programs, agencies, and departments from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013. The budget includes state revenues distributed through the General Revenue Fund (GRF) and the distribution of ALL FUNDS, which includes federal funds, grants, fees, etc.

Proposed total funding levels in the Jobs Budget for the General Revenue Fund (GRF) increase from $26.611 billion in FY11 (estimate) to $26.892 billion in FY12 to $28.622 billion in FY13.

The total for All Funding groups decreases from $62.659 billion in FY11 (estimate) to $59.36 billion in FY12 and then increases to $60.18 billion in FY13.

According to the OBM’s “Budget Overview”, “The goal of Gov. John Kasich’s budget proposal — The Jobs Budget — is to create a jobs-friendly environment in Ohio.” A social safety net for Ohio’s most vulnerable citizens is preserved while restructuring Medicaid.

Approximately $2.3 billion in savings is achieved by reducing 250 line items; $1.4 billion is saved by restructuring Medicaid; and other savings are achieved by accelerating the phaseout of reimbursements to school districts and local governments for the loss of the Tangible Personal Property Tax (TPPT) and Kilowatt Hour Tax.

The following are some highlights from the Budget Overview:

The Jobs Budget

  • closes an $8 billion budget deficit
  • preserves $800 million in tax cuts
  • includes $34 million in job-creating tax incentives
  • consolidates Medicaid to control costs
  • utilizes state assets to leverage savings
  • includes tools to help local government reduce costs
  • decreases funding for forty-four out of 59 agencies; holds seven agencies at current funding levels; increases funding for eight agencies; and decreases funding for two-thirds of the line items in the budget.

Budget Recommendations for the Ohio Arts Council:  The Jobs Budget decreases GRF for the Ohio Arts Council from $6.95 million in FY11 to $5.3 million in FY12 (a 19.5 percent decrease from FY11) to $5.3 million in FY13.

Funding for FY12 for All Funds is $6.79 million (a 16.1 percent decrease from FY11). Funding for FY13 is $6.79 million.

The Jobs Budget provides $4 million to support over 600 grants per fiscal year, benefiting programs in community arts; folk and traditional arts; music, dance and theatre; the literary arts; arts education; arts programs in community organizations; public arts programs at colleges and universities; and individual artists.

According to the Blue Books, the proposed budget for the Ohio Arts Council also supports over 100,000 young people and 180,000 adults through school-based arts education and life-long learning programs each year.

Budget Recommendations for K-12 Education:  Proposed funding levels for K-12 GRF550 Foundation Funding increases from $5.31 billion in FY11 (estimate) to $5.4 billion in FY12 (2 percent increase) and $5.5 billion in FY13 (1.5 percent increase).

General Revenue Fund for K-12 increases from $6.26 billion in FY11 to $6.3 billion in FY12 (1 percent increase) to $6.4 billion in FY13 9 (1.4 percent increase).

All Funds for K-12 decrease from $11.53 billion in FY11 to $10.2 billion in FY12 to $9.7 billion in FY13.  The decrease in funding is the result of the expiration of federal stimulus funds appropriated via the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); decreases in federal funding for IDEA, Title 1, and other federal programs; decreases in lottery profits; and changes proposed for the Revenue Distribution Fund.

The Revenue Distribution Fund (line items 900 and 909) decreases from $1.2 billion in FY11 to $756 million in FY12 to $505 million in FY13. This fund is used to reimbursement school districts for local tax revenue lost as a result of the elimination of the Tangible Personal Property Tax (TPPT) and the Kilowatt Hour Tax.  The Jobs Budget proposes to accelerate the phase-out of reimbursements to school districts for these lost revenues.  The amount of reimbursement that a school district will receive will depend on how much the school district relies on the reimbursement as part of its overall budget.

The following summary of certain provisions in The Jobs Budget regarding K-12 education was prepared from the “Blue Book” and the “Budget Overview”:

K-12 EDUCATION:  The proposed budget “provides a reform agenda to move Ohio from being a manager of the educational status quo to a higher performer.”

TEACHERS:  The Jobs Budget “welcomes” teachers trained through Teach for America; provides a bonus to teachers for increased student learning; lets teacher quality drive employment decisions instead of seniority; tests teachers in failing schools; and streamlines the dismissal process for poor-performing educators.

Educator Preparation (line item 448) is reduced by 40 percent from FY11 to FY12 ($1.3 million to $786,737).

SCHOOLS:  The Jobs Budget includes provisions to give parents the right to reconstitute their children’s school; creates innovation schools; ranks schools on the basis of student performance and cost effectiveness; creates a student results-driven recognition programs; and revokes the charters of the poorest-performing schools.

Funding for Career Technical Education, Joint Vocational Schools Districts, Students at Risk, and Special Education is maintained, and changes are recommended for Gifted Education.

  • $1 million is redistributed each year from Tech Pre Consortia to increase funding for High Schools That Work and Tech Prep grants.
  • Funding for Special Education is included in Line Item GRF 550 Foundation Funding.  Special Education is funded at $593.9 million in FY11, and in FY12, and FY13.
  • Funding for At Risk students through GRF 550 Foundation Funding is maintained at $608.9 million in FY11, and in FY12 and FY13.
  • Funding for Gifted Education ($68.3 million in FY11) is included in basic aid support for schools, but the distribution mechanism will not be known until the budget language for HB153 is introduced. The spending requirements for gifted education are eliminated.  Funding for gifted units provided by Educational Service Centers ($8.1 million in FY12 and FY13) is still included in GRF 550 Foundation Funding.

Funding for Pupil Transportation, Line Item GRF 502, decreases from $462.8 million in FY11 to $438.2 million in FY12, and increases to $442.1 million in FY13.

SCHOOL CHOICE: The Jobs Budget expands the number of EdChoice Scholarships; removes the cap on community schools; and enhances community school access to facilities. The total budget for School Choice is $92.7 million in FY12 and in FY13.

Non-public schools receive administrative cost reimbursements and support for auxiliary services such as the purchase of secular textbooks, health and diagnostic services, guidance and social work counseling.  The funding increase (1.4 percent in FY12, and 1.5 percent in FY13) for nonpublic schools represents the same aggregate percentage increase of the line items GRF 550 Foundation Funding and GRF 502 Pupil Transportation.

Line item 455 Community Schools and Choice Programs is increased from $1 million in FY11 to $2.2 million in FY12 and FY13, an increase of 120 percent from FY11 to FY12.

SHARED SERVICES:  The Jobs Budget proposes that services provided by Educational Service Centers and Technology Centers be integrated through Regional Shared Service Centers, which would provide support to school districts and local governments.  A new health insurance program for schools and local governments, the Ohio Public Employees Health Care Program, will also be created and managed by the Department of Administrative Services.

Half of the funds for GRF431 School Improvement Initiatives ($7.39 million) are transferred to Educational Service Centers to provide school improvement services to school districts.

Other Budget Recommendations:  The following are highlights of the Jobs Budget for key areas of Ohio government:

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
The Ohio Department of Education’s general administrative and program support is reduced by 8.7 percent.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Jobs Budget funds approximately 5,700 children and 2,000 preschool special education classrooms. Funding for Early Childhood Education is maintained at $23.26 million in FY12 and in FY13.

Funding for Help Me Grow decreases from $36.5 million in FY11 to $33.6 million in FY12 and $36.6 million in FY13.

Funding for Early Care and Education (Line item 600635 Ohio Department of Job and Family Services) decreases from $134.2 million in FY11 to $123.5 million in FY12 to $123.5 million in FY13. Child care eligibility will be reduced to 125 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) from the current level of 150 percent, but an outtake level of 200 percent of the FPL will be maintained. Approximately 103,865 children will be served per month in 2012 and 104,350 children per month in 2013.  Currently 104,000 children are served per month. Provider rates decrease seven percent.

Step up to Quality will be funded at $27.7 million each year to support child care resource and referral services, professional development, technical assistance, and quality payments to providers.

BOARD OF REGENTS
The Jobs Budget increases GRF from $2.1 billion in FY11 to $2.2 billion (1.1 percent increase) in FY12 and to $2.3 billion (3.7 percent) in FY13.

All Funds decrease from $2.5 billion in FY11 to $2.29 billion (10.5 percent decrease) in FY12 and increase to $2.38 billion (3.7 increase) in FY13.

The Jobs Budget increases the State Share of Instruction by 2.7 percent in FY12 and .9 percent in FY13.  The budget also includes a proposal for the Chancelor of the Ohio Board of Regents to submit to the General Assembly a plan to create charter universities; develop a three-year college program; increase the faculty teaching load by one course every other year; reduce education remediation rates and costs and define “remediation free”; increase the number of students who receive college credit while in high school; and maintain the tuition cap of 3.5 percent.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT
The Jobs Budget reduces state revenue sharing with local government. The proposed funding for the Local Government Fund decreases from $665 million in FY11 (estimate) to $526 million in FY12 and $339 million in FY13. The Library Fund is cut by five percent.

The budget also proposes the following strategies to reduce costs for local governments and schools:

  • reduces mandates
  • expands the use of technology for purchasing and other operations
  • reduces the public notice costs by creating a statewide public notice website
  • empowers local governments to collaborate and share services, such as creating a state-managed health care pool for schools and local governments
  • provides more flexibility by changing collective bargaining
  • allows colleges, universities, and schools to use a single prime contractor to reduce construction costs

PRISONS AND SENTENCING
The Jobs Budget supports sentencing reform and incentives for positive inmate behavior.  The budget includes the sale and privatization of five prisons and closing four prison camps.

JOB CREATION
The Jobs Budget proposes to create a stable dedicated funding stream for job creation to support JobsOhio.  Ohio’s Liquor Enterprise will be transferred to JobsOhio to create a dedicated funding source from Ohio’s liquor profits to fund ongoing economic development activities and operating costs.  The Department of Commerce will manage the day to day operations of the Liquor Enterprise.  The state will receive a lump sum of $500 million to compensate the state for the loss of liquor profit, and $700 million to prepay the current outstanding liquor profit bonds.

TRANSFORMING MEDICAID
Ohio’s Medicaid system, which serves 2.2 million Ohioans, costs $18 billion in FY11, and is expected to grow as the federal share of Medicaid declines in 2012. To contain costs and improve services, the Jobs Budget proposes to improve care coordination; provide accountable care for children; integrate behavioral and physical health care; re-balance long-term care; improve accountability for services in nursing homes; and modernize reimbursement rules.

PENSION CHANGE
The Jobs Budget recommends a 12/12 contribution rate for employers and employees to pension plans, which will save $570 million. There is a concern about this proposal, which some believe will prevent the systems from maintaining the thirty year pension funding requirement.

State Board of Education: The State Board of Education met on March 14-15, 2011 at the Ohio School for the Deaf, 500 Morse Road, Columbus.

The Achievement Committee, chaired by Mike Collins, approved a resolution to adopt Model Curricula in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies; approved a resolution of intent to adopt Pre-K English Language Arts and Math Standards; received a presentation on the Interstate Compact for Educational Opportunities for Military Children; and approved a resolution of intent to adopt changes in the value added rules.

The Capacity Committee, chaired by Kristen McKinley, approved a resolution to adopt Rules 3301-104-01 to 03, Expenditures for Computers or Internet Based School Rules, and discussed the model policy for Tobacco Free Schools.

The Advocacy and Outreach Committee, chaired by Mary Rose Oakar, received a presentation about the state budget process and how a bill becomes law from Representative Stebelton, chair of the House Education Committee; received information about three bills that include changes in the EdChoice Scholarship program and bills regarding calamity days; discussed HB96 (Celeste), which specifies dyslexia as a specific learning disability and requires a pilot project to provide early screening and intervention services for children with dyslexia; and received an update about the federal budget.

A Chapter 119 Hearing was conducted regarding the following rules:
-3301-44-01 to 08 Post Secondary Enrollment Options
-3301-92-01, 02, Textbooks and Instructional Materials

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011
On March 15, 2011 the Board convened its business meeting and immediately proceeded into executive session.

Following the executive session the Board held elections for Board officers.  The Board elected by roll-call vote Debe Terhar president (vote 10 to 9) and Tom Gunlock vice president (vote 10 to 9).

The Board continued its meeting with the report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Deborah Delisle, which included five items: preparation of testimony on the education budget; Ohio’s Race to the Top State Reform Steering Team Committee (SRST) meeting; RttT Innovation Symposium; 21st Century Summit on April 5 & 6, 2011; and Willard Daggett International Education meeting.

After the Superintendent concluded her remarks, she announced her resignation as Superintendent effective April 30, 2011.  She explained the her decision to resign was influenced by a meeting that she had had with two members of Governor Kasich’s administration.

Several Board members expressed their shock at the circumstances surrounding the resignation and their belief that the Constitutional authority of the State Board and its ability to function as an independent, non-partisan Board might be compromised.

There was a lengthy discussion during which some Board members requested that the Board take action in response to the resignation. Board members also requested that a process be established to select the next Superintendent.

Following the discussion the Board resumed its business meeting and took action on eleven personnel items and the resolutions included below. The Board then considered several items under new business. Board members submitted several resolutions to be considered by the State Board at the April 2011 meeting regarding the resignation of Superintendent Delisle.

The Board then received a report from the Urban Schools Committee, which had met on Monday.  Jeff Mimms reported that the Urban Schools Committee reviewed an 1996 ODE report regarding successful schools and how to motivate young people to stay in school.  The committee also reviewed performance index data that shows an increase in student achievement in school districts from 2002-2009.  The data showed that while the Urban 8 School Districts improved faster than the Urban 21, they did not improve at a higher rate than school districts in Ohio overall.

During public participation on non-agenda items, Lt. Commander Patrick Powers of the Cleveland Recruiting Battalion, addressed the Board.

The Board then adjourned.

Resolutions Considered by the State Board of Education at the March 2011 Meeting

#3 Approved a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rule 3301-24-14 of the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) entitled Supplemental Teaching License.

#4 Approved a Resolution of Intent to Adopt Preschool Content Standards and their successors in mathematics and English Language Arts.

#5 Approved a Resolution of Intent to consider confirmation of the Reynoldsburg City School District’s determination of impractical transportation of a certain student attending Liberty Christian Academy, a chartered nonpublic school, Licking County.

#6 Approved a Resolution of Intent to Adopt the Diversity Strategy Recommendations set forth in the OSU Kirwan Institute’s Report and Recommendations on Diversity Strategies for Successful Schools, and to Direct the Development of an Implementation Plan.

#7 Amended the Resolution and then approved a Resolution to grant the Transfer of School District Territory from the Mansfield City School District, Richland County, to the Lexington Local School District, Richland County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#8a  Defeated a Resolution to Deny the Transfer of School District Territory from the Columbus City School District, Franklin County to the Westerville City School District, Franklin County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#8b  Defeated a Resolution to Approve the Transfer of School District Territory from the Columbus City School District, Franklin County to the Westerville City School District, Franklin County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#9 Approved a Resolution to Accept the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Deny the Transfer of School District Territory from the Bethel Local School District, Miami County, to the Miami East Local School District, Miami County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

The Resolution was amended to advise the petitioners that they are not precluded from submitting an amended request for a transfer of territory in the future.

#10) Approved a Resolution to Accept the Recommendation of the Hearing Officer and to Approve the Transfer of School District Territory from the Alexander Local School District, Athens County, to the Athens City School District, Athens County, pursuant to Section 3311.24 of the Ohio Revised Code.

#20 Approved a Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-11-10 entitled payment of Scholarship Amounts.

#21 Approved a Resolution to Rescind and Adopt Rule 3301-24-03 entitled Teacher Education Programs.

#22 Approved a Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-39-01, to rescind and adopt Rules 3301-39-02 and 3301-39-03 and to rescind Rule 3301-39-04 regarding approval of nonpublic schools.

#23 Approved a Resolution to Adopt Model Curricula in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies in accordance with the requirements of Revised Code Section 3301.079.

#24 Defeated a Motion to Relocate the State Board of Education’s Regularly Scheduled Administrative Rule Hearing from the Ohio School for the Deaf to the Ohio Department of Education, commencing with the Rule Hearings Scheduled for April 2011.

#25 Approved a Motion Regarding the 2011-2012 State Board Meeting Dates.

#26 Approved a Resolution to Accept the Surrender of and Revoke the Charter of Natural Learning Montessori Academy.

#27 Approved a Resolution of Intent to amend OAC Rules 3301-51-01 and 3301-58-03 Value Added Progress Dimension.

#28 Approved a Resolution, under emergency consideration, that directs the leadership of the State Board of Education to draft a letter to the Governor, with the approval of the State Board of Education, regarding the appropriate contact of the governor and his office with the Superintendent of Public Instruction about any and all aspects of employment of the Superintendent, and requests that any options regarding the employment of the Superintendent be directed to the State Board of Education.  The vote was eleven to five with one abstention.

Daniel Pink on Teacher Performance:  Daniel Pink reviews on his website the results of two studies about how teacher incentive programs affect student performance. (“Does giving teachers bonuses improve student performance?” March 16, 2011 http://www.danpink.com/).

According to the website, a recently published study of a teacher incentive program in the Nashville Public Schools, “showed an effect somewhere between minuscule and nonexistent” on student performance.

Another study published by Harvard economist Roland Fryer, examines the effects of pay-for-performance program for teachers in the New York City public schools. This study found, “…no evidence that teacher incentives increase student performance, attendance, or graduation,” or evidence that the incentives change student or teacher behavior. In fact the study showed that teacher incentives might decrease student achievement, especially in larger schools.

The results of these studies are timely for teachers and policy-makers in Ohio, because one of the reforms included in Governor Kasich’s proposed budget (HB153) for education is plan to give teachers a bonus for each student who improves their achievement.

The review is at http://www.danpink.com/.
The Harvard paper is available.

Bills Introduced

  • HB153 (Amstutz) Biennial Budget: Makes operating appropriations for the biennium beginning July 1, 2011, and ending June 30, 2013, and provides for the authorization and conditions for the operation of state programs.
  • HB155 (Fedor) School Bullying Policies:  Enacts the “Jessica Logan Act” to require that public school bullying policies prohibit bullying through electronic means and address certain acts that occur off school property and requires staff training on the bullying policy.
  • HB157 (Schuring) Teacher Development on Dyslexia: Authorizes educational service centers to provide teacher professional development on dyslexia.
  • HB164 (Blessing) Community School for Incarcerated Adults: Permits the establishment of a community school to serve adults of school age who are incarcerated or who have been released from the custody of the Department of Youth Services, and declares an emergency.
  • SB118 (Cates) Body Mass Screenings – Schools:  Makes schools’ implementation of body mass index screenings optional.
  • SB119 (Kearney) State Lottery Sale:  Creates the Commission to Study the Sale of the State Lottery.
  • HB159 (Mecklenborg) Voters Provide Photo Identification:  Requires electors who appear at a poling place to vote or who cast absent voter’s ballots in person to provide photo identification; establishes a process for electors who cannot afford photo identification to receive free photo identification; and permits electors with a religious objection to being photographed to vote in person upon the execution of an affirmation to that effect.

FYI ARTS: Invitation for Submission of Works is Extended to March 31, 2011: The Dublin Arts Council (DAC) & OhioDance, in collaboration with The Ohio State University Department of Dance & Ohio Department of Education Division of the Arts is seeking submissions for “Gravity’s Ripple III” on September 12-17, 2011.

These organizations are partnering to present a unique opportunity for the planning, development, and performance of a site-specific outdoor contemporary dance work and a residency that incorporates individual educational opportunities. This contemporary dance project, entitled “Gravity’s Ripple III,” is part of DAC’s ongoing program, “Ripple Effect: Artistic Impact of the Scioto River.”

Submission of portfolios for Gravity’s Ripple III has been extended to March 31, 2011. Submissions of online video links or DVDs will also be accepted.  For full details about the submission process please go to: http://ohiodance.org/resource_auditions.php.

Please submit all “Gravity’s Ripple III” applications and direct all correspondence and questions to:
Jane D’Angelo, Executive Director
OhioDance
77 S. High St., 2nd Floor
Columbus, OH 43215
(614) 224-2913
jane@ohiodance.org
www.ohiodance.org

Gamechangers for Arts Education:  James Palmarini, editor of Teaching Theatre and director of educational policy for the Educational Theatre Association, writes on March 15, 2011 in the Educational Theater Association Advocacy blog that at least two “gamechangers” in regard to education are taking place. The first is the massive cuts being proposed for the federal budget, and the second is the movement in states to restrict or completely eliminate collective bargaining for public employees.

He goes on to summarize a number of instances in which funding for the arts has been eliminated or reduced in schools across the nation, and asks arts education advocates to contact members of Congress and request that funding for “Arts in Education” and the National Endowment for the Arts be restored to FY10 levels in the federal budget.

Regarding collective bargaining, Palmarini notes that collective bargaining has been used to reduce class size and improve student access to arts instruction. These outcomes support students as well as teachers.

The blog is available.

Can Arts Education Be a Savior to the Economy? Jim Denova, of the Benedum Foundation and Gregg Behr, of The Grable Foundation write for the State Journal that the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) “…do not sufficiently address another important ingredient in national and international competitiveness: creativity.” (“Can Arts Education Be a Savior to the Economy”, March 10, 2011),

The authors note that a recent cover story in Newsweek cited an IBM poll of 1,500 CEOs who identified creativity as the primary competency necessary in our work force to lead our nation to a prosperous future. To cultivate creativity, some educators have “launched” a new movement called STEAM, which stands for Science, Technology, Arts and Mathematics. “It is the next generation of STEM, and it elevates creativity to the pivotal role that glues the other disciplines together.”

They cite robotics and game design as examples of STEAM in action, and provide specific examples of how the arts are being used to help students hone 21st century skills, such as creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, and communication, in schools in West Virginia and Pittsburgh.

They write, “Simply put, creativity is something that can be taught – in schools, at libraries and even in our own homes. More importantly, creativity is something that must be nurtured in all children. It’s not an exaggeration to say that our very future depends upon it. It’s what will keep that “Gathering Storm” away.”

The article is available.

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About OAAE

Since our founding in 1974, by Dr. Dick Shoup and Jerry Tollifson, our mission has always been to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Working at the local, state, and federal levels through the efforts of a highly qualified and elected Board of Directors, our members, and a professional staff we have four primary areas of focus: building collaborations, professional development, advocacy, and capacity building. The OAAE is funded in part for its day-to-day operation by the Ohio Arts Council. This support makes it possible for the OAAE to operate its office in Columbus and to work statewide to ensure the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan. Support for arts education projects comes from the Ohio Arts Council, The John F. Kennedy Center, Ohio Music Education Association, Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre Association, VSA Ohio, and OhioDance. The Community Arts Education programs of Central Ohio are financially assisted by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners and the Greater Columbus Arts Council. We gratefully acknowledge and appreciate the financial support received from each of these outstanding agencies and organizations.
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