Arts On Line Education Update September 18, 2017

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Schools can soon apply for STEAM designation
“The Ohio General Assembly recently passed legislation to designate STEAM schools in Ohio, which are STEM schools that also emphasize the arts. The Department will update the application for STEM designation to reflect this change and will make it available in late November. More information will be available on the Department of Education website later this fall. For questions or more information, contact Holly Lavender at (614) 387-0539.”

Ohio Submits its ESSA State Plan to U.S. Department of Education
“The Ohio Department of Education today submitted the state’s plan, as approved by the State Board of Education, to the U.S. Department of Education for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Ohio’s ESSA plan specifies, to the federal government, key aspects of Ohio’s education policy framework and reflects engagement with parents, students, educators, and business and community leaders, as well as the governor and General Assembly.”

For a full review of Ohio’s plan click here.

2017 Ohio School Report Cards Released
“The Ohio Department of Education has released the annual Ohio School Report Cards. The grades and other data for all schools and districts, including community and other schools, can be found at reportcard.education.ohio.gov. Districts and schools were graded on six components for the 2016-2017 school year. The components are Achievement, Progress, Gap Closing, Graduation Rate, K-3 Literacy and Prepared for Success. Districts and schools received A-F grades on each of the six components and most of the individual measures. There are no new measures on the 2016-2017 report cards. More information about the components can be found here.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Grades rise slightly on Ohio’s 2017 state report cards in year three of Common Core standards
“Grades for Ohio’s school districts rose slightly on the 2017 state report cards released Thursday morning, but grades are still far lower than a few years ago — by design. Ohio’s shift to new multi-state Common Core learning standards and higher expectations of students brought plummeting grades and dramatic swings in results in 2015 and 2016, the first two years of the transition. The A and B grades that used to dominate report cards turned to C’s and D’s.”

September is National Suicide Prevention Month
“The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services is collaborating with other state and local agencies, organizations and individuals to save lives. Information and resources about Ohio’s Suicide Prevention Plan is available here. K-12 professionals — school nurses, teachers, counselors, school psychologists and administrators — at public elementary, middle and high schools now must take safety and violence prevention training.”

 

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

House Education and Career Readiness Committee
The committee heard proponent and opponent testimony on HB21, the bill which addresses the verification of community school enrollment and puts the onus on charter schools to determine residency. Proponent Matthew Dotson, with the Ohio Education Association’s Government Relations Division, supported the bill because of challenges school districts face in attempting to verify student residency. Ron Adler, president of the Ohio Coalition for Quality Education, opposed the measure saying “HB21 will add another burdensome requirement of submitting residency records to ODE monthly. This new mandate would create a major financial burden and divert funds for educating urban students to superfluous record keeping.”

The Columbus/Central Ohio Building & Construction Trades Council gave proponent testimony on HB98. This bill addresses the presentation of career information to students and supporters feel it will help in recruiting the next generation’s skilled labor workforce.

The committee heard opponent testimony on HB108, which would require one-half unit of instruction in financial literacy within the high school curriculum. The executive director of the Ohio Association of Independent Schools testified in opposition of the bill voicing concern about adding additional mandates.

Reps. John A. Boccieri (D-Poland) and Jeffrey S. Rezabek (R-Clayton) offered sponsor testimony on HB246. This bill would require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to provide funding to certain county boards of developmental disabilities for classroom facilities projects.

Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC)
The JEOC heard presentations on successful initiatives focused on addressing social-emotional development to improve outcome for students who have experienced trauma. The PAX Good Behavior Game, the Neurosequential Model in Education and the Mayerson Academy’s Thriving Learning Communities curriculum were discussed with the committee.

 

NEWLY INTRODUCED LEGISLATION

SB191 SCHOOL BREAKFAST (Schiavoni, J.)
To establish the ‘Breakfast After The Bell Program’ for public schools.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, September 18

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education
State Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, September 19

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education
State Board of Education Meeting

Wednesday, September 20

11:00 a.m. Ohio Statehouse, Room 115
Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB217 Brenner, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony
Prohibit college applications asking about disciplinary actions

HB203 Barnes, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony
Increase access to youth summer job opportunities

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 5th Hearing, All Testimony
Revise workforce development laws

3:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse, South Hearing Room
Education Committee Chair: Lehner

SB172 Yuko, 1st Hearing, Sponsor
Establish Hunger-Free Students’ Bill of Rights Act

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 1st Hearing, Sponsor
Address computer science curriculum

SB104 Tavares, 1st Hearing, Sponsor
Prohibit use of seclusion on school pupils

SB105 Tavares, 1st Hearing, Sponsor
Designate Ohio Principals Month

 

NATIONAL NEWS

EdWeek: House OKs Bill to Slash Education Budget as School Choice Push Loses Out
“The House of Representatives voted Thursday to approve an education funding bill that would cut about $2.3 billion from the U.S. Department of Education, a roughly 3.5 percent reduction from the agency’s current budget of $68.4 billion. The House bill funding the department for fiscal year 2018 would eliminate $2 billion in Title II funding for teacher training and class size reduction, and cut $100 million from current spending on after-school aid. The legislation, which was approved by a 211-198 vote, keeps Title I funding for disadvantaged students flat at about $15.4 billion, and also includes a $200 million increase for special education.”

US News and World Report: DeVos Asks the Education Establishment to ‘Rethink’ Schools
“Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos slammed the established “education system” Tuesday, kicking off a “Rethink School” tour to highlight innovative ways educators are meeting the needs of students in K-12 and higher education. “It’s time to rethink school,” DeVos said to students at the Woods Learning Center in Casper, Wyoming, Tuesday morning, where she began the weeklong tour.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Portrait of an Art Advocate: Jacquelyn S. Quay

JQuayJacquelyn S. Quay, EdD.
Director of Arts Education, Greenacres Foundation, Greenacres Arts Center
OAAE Board President Elect

 

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child? 

A: As a child I sang in choruses, choirs, in the car with my family and on my own.  I acted in musicals and drama/comedies/operas throughout childhood and beyond.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: My favorite “a-ha moment” came when I realized while teaching junior high music that I loved teaching music more than I loved performing.  If I could influence children to enjoy music then I could start to build the next generation of advocates for music and music education.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: I have moved from instruction to curriculum development and supervision of instruction.  I am inspired by my team mates to be more creative when we are designing content activities for the children who come on field trips to the arts center.  As a team we do not lack in coming up with creative ideas.  The conversations are generative, engaging and extremely creative.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: One puzzle I am working on right now is how to get educators to think about evaluation systems that include assessments that are aligned to fine arts content standards.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: The arts educator who impacted me in my younger days was Dr. Richard (Dick) Shoup, one of the founders of the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.  He mentored me as my school district was developing a graded course of study for music education K-12, something with which I was unfamiliar and grew to love because of him.  I never thought curriculum development would be my thing but it became it!

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Support the arts and arts education at the local level by being proactive and starting the dialogue with school board members, administrators, teachers and other parents about the value of the arts in your child’s life and in the community.  Be informed about the issues in the arts and arts education in your state.  If you wait for the vote whether or not your child will have a high quality arts education, it may be too late.  Go to the performances and art shows at your school.  Encourage your children to participate in the arts in and out of school. Take your child to the arts.  Remember that the arts are part of a well-rounded education as described in federal legislation (ESSA).

Portrait of an Art Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature, send an email to akruse@oaae.net.

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Arts On Line Education Update September 11, 2017

Welcome to the first edition of Arts On Line for the 2017-2018 school year!  To all of you arts educators, advocates, and allies:  Thank you for all you do in support of arts education in Ohio.  The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (OAAE) works to ensure that the arts are an integral part of the education of every Ohioan.  Below you will find information on events and people that are moving us in the right direction, such as National Arts in Education Week (this week!) and our own OAAE President Elect, Jackie Quay, who has devoted her career to teaching, and to supporting and improving arts education for all in our state.  As you’ll read here, visual arts teacher Jonathan Juravich has just been named 2018 Ohio Teacher of the Year, only the third arts educator to be recognized for this honor in the 53-year history of the award (George Edge, instrumental music, 2008;  Fred Lee Votaw, visual arts, 1981).  We are inspired by Jonathan, Jackie, and thousands of other arts educators and arts supporters in Ohio who are working each day to bring greater awareness to the value of arts learning in P-16 schools, in other community settings, and throughout our lives.

If you believe arts learning plays a critical role in a well-rounded curriculum, please let us know by becoming an OAAE member.  Help us support the arts as an equal partner in education in Ohio!

 

IT’S NATIONAL ART EDUCATION WEEK!

September 11 – 15 is National Art Education Week.  Passed by Congress in 2010, House Resolution 275 designates this week as a time to join together in communities across the country to promote the amazing influence of the arts in education. Visit AmericanForTheArts.com for more information.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Central Ohio Art Teacher Awarded Teacher of the Year

Congratulations to Olentangy School District teacher, and OAAE Member, Jonathan Juravich for being awarded the 2018 Teacher of the Year!  Juravich is an art teacher at Liberty Tree Elementary School in Powell and has been teaching in the district since 2005.

2017 Ohio School Report Cards to be Released

The 2017 Ohio School Report Cards are expected to be released on Thursday, Sept. 14.  Districts and schools are being graded on six components for the 2016-2017 school year: Achievement, Gap Closing, K-3 Literacy, Progress, Graduation Rate and Prepared for Success. Districts and schools receive A-F grades on each of the six components and most of the individual measures.

Fast facts for families about excessive absences and truancy

In December 2016, the Ohio General Assembly passed House Bill 410 to support districts in a preventative approach to excessive absences and truancy. As a result, several changes take effect with the 2017-2018 school year.  Ohio defines chronic absenteeism as missing 10 percent or more of the school year for any reason.

ODE handouts and facts for families and schools

Columbus Dispatch1 in 6 central Ohio schools has chronic attendance problems

“Students who are not at school and not being home-schooled are unlikely to be learning. If they are missing school frequently, they are falling farther and farther behind classmates.  At 1 in 10 public schools in America, 30 percent or more of the students are chronically absent. At another tenth of schools, 20 to 29 percent are gone too often.”

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

HB318: SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS (Patterson, J., LaTourette, S.)

Summary – This legislation would develop hiring guidelines and training requirements for school resource officers in an effort to increase school safety and address issues like truancy and drug use among students.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, September 12

4:00 p.m.  Education and Career Readiness Committee, Chair: Brenner Room 121

  • HB246 Boccieri/Rezabek, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony, Provide funding for county DD board classroom facilities
  • HB98 Duffey/Boggs, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony, Address career information presentations to students
  • HB21 Hambley, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony, Verify community school enrollments
  • HB108 Hagan/McColley, 3rd Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony, Include financial literacy in high school curriculum

 

PORTRAIT OF AN ART ADVOCATE 

JQuayJacquelyn S. Quay, EdD.

Director of Arts Education, Greenacres Foundation, Greenacres Arts Center, LLC OAAE Board President Elect (October 2018)

 

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: As a child I sang in choruses, choirs, in the car with my family and on my own.  I acted in musicals and drama/comedies/operas throughout childhood and beyond.

 

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education. 

A: My favorite “a-ha moment” came when I realized while teaching junior high music that I loved teaching music more than I loved performing.  If I could influence children to enjoy music then I could start to build the next generation of advocates for music and music education.

 

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: I have moved from instruction to curriculum development and supervision of instruction.  I am inspired by my team mates to be more creative when we are designing content activities for the children who come on field trips to the arts center.  As a team we do not lack in coming up with creative ideas.  The conversations are generative, engaging and extremely creative.

 

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now. 

A: One puzzle I am working on right now is how to get educators to think about evaluation systems that include assessments that are aligned to fine arts content standards.

 

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days. 

A: The arts educator who impacted me in my younger days was Dr. Richard (Dick) Shoup, one of the founders of the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.  He mentored me as my school district was developing a graded course of study for music education K-12, something with which I was unfamiliar and grew to love because of him.  I never thought curriculum development would be my thing but it became it!

 

 Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools? 

A: Support the arts and arts education at the local level by being proactive and starting the dialogue with school board members, administrators, teachers and other parents about the value of the arts in your child’s life and in the community.  Be informed about the issues in the arts and arts education in your state.  If you wait for the vote whether or not your child will have a high quality arts education, it may be too late.  Go to the performances and art shows at your school.  Encourage your children to participate in the arts in and out of school. Take your child to the arts.  Remember that the arts are part of a well-rounded education as described in federal legislation (ESSA).

 

Portrait of an Art Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

 

FYI ARTS

Cleveland Metro School District seeks Arts Director
“We are seeking an Arts Education Director to guide the creation of a new Arts Education
Plan for CMSD, which is intended to serve as a rallying point for our partners in
the arts, business, government and funding communities. As these partners engage
with CMSD and share their wisdom and perspectives, this common vision will only
grow stronger.”

Full job posting: https://clevelandmetroschools.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/jobs/job/Administration-or-As-Assigned/Arts-Director_R0002779-1
OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017
The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO:
The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the
University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s
book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the
great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August
through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery
Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

2

Image Credit:

Judy Schachner, “Dewey Bob” from “Dewey Bob”, 2016, mixed media, courtesy of the
University of Findlay’s Mazza Collection

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference
The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity
to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.
Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

https://omeapdc.com/

Embedding Culturally Responsive Practices in Pyramid Model
Professional Development Workshop for Early Childhood Educators
“Come join us at BalletMet for a seminar focused on four specific strategies used
to address challenging behavior within the Pyramid Model framework and how these
strategies may contribute to a culturally responsive, positive, and affirming classroom
climate! Strategies Include: developing and teaching expectations, teaching empathy,
taking perspectives, and using circles to resolve conflict.”

Host: BalletMet Columbus
Date: September 29, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Location: BalletMet Dance Centre – 322 Mt. Vernon Ave, Columbus, OH 43215
Cost: $20 (free for 2017-2018 participating classroom teachers of The Wiggle Jig
program)
Workshop flyer: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/2d97eea6-fed0-4759-8688-54f1294943b9.pdf

Registration form: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/69bf8854-bedb-47cd-8931-138b054b42eb.docx

About the presenter:
Charis Lauren Price, PhD, BCBA is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood / Special
Education at The University of Missouri-St. Louis. Ms. Price has over ten years
of experience supporting the social-emotional development of young children in urban
communities. In addition to leading staff trainings for Early Head Start / Head
Start, and other child-care facilities in urban environments, she has presented
at several national conferences including the National Training Institute on Effective
Practices for Addressing Challenging Behavior, Division for Early Childhood (DEC),
and the National American Indian and Alaska Native Child Care Conference. She has
also published articles that address young children’s social-emotional development.
Charis conducts applied research in inclusive early childhood classrooms with a
particular focus on children with challenging behavior, including children with
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Her primary research interests include supporting
the social- emotional literacies of young children in urban early childhood environments.

Finding Our Voice: An Arts and Education Summit Professional Development Day
“Join the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education for this exciting event where
we will “Find Our Voice!” The morning session includes a keynote address by Jeff
Poulin, Arts Education Manager from Americans for the Arts, followed by a lively panel discussion to take a deeper dive into the importance of arts education from a local perspective. The afternoon will provide a number of Professional Development sessions for teachers including topics such as STEM2STEAM, Arts and Social/Emotional Learning, Moving beyond the THINK System, Arts Education Advocacy for Teachers, and the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative. The day promises you’ll have opportunities to interact
with colleagues and share ideas along the way.”

Location: Cincinnati Art Museum
Date: November 7, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $20
Event registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/finding-our-voice-an-arts-and-education-summit-professional-development-day-registration-37735910123

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student
growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their
own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire
skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions
will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and
an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning.
Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music,
theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

* How to prioritize fine arts standards
* Deconstruction of standards
* Aligning assessments with standards
* Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
* Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
* Sharing with & learning from colleagues
* Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:
Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1b5630a4-43c0-4c81-baee-ad930f9b9173.pdf

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.
Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: ESC of Lorain County
Date: November 6, 2017
To register contact: http://www.esclc.org/
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update June 26, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The Ohio Senate passed its version of the proposed FY18-19 biennial budget last week with an amendment approving alternate pathways to graduation for the Class of 2018.  The budget bill is now in the hands of the conference committee where the House and Senate will work out differences between their two versions of the bill.  The Legislative Services Commission (LSC) comparison document of both the House and Senate versions of the budget bill can be reviewed here.

 

Members of the conference committee include Reps. Scott Ryan (R-Newark), Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) and Jack Cera (D-Bellaire) and Sens. Scott Oelslager (R-North Canton), Gayle Manning (R-North Ridgeville) and Mike Skindell (D-Lakewood).  The conference committee is expected to report out the legislation this week, and then the bill will head to Governor Kasich for consideration.

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: $65.4 billion Ohio budget bill clears Senate: See where the money goes

“The Ohio Senate on Wednesday passed a $65.4 billion two-year state budget after making more than 150 changes to the bill passed by the House, setting the stage for a week of behind-the-scenes maneuvers and compromises between the two chambers. The Senate voted 24 to 8, largely along party lines, to approve the two-year budget.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: HS graduation requirements eased under Senate proposal

“The state Senate is looking to stave off a possible high school graduation “crisis” by allowing students to graduate even with poor scores on state tests.  The Senate Finance Committee included exemptions from test score requirements in its new version of the state budget bill today. Those must still pass the full Senate and also be accepted by the House, then gain approval from Gov. John Kasich, before becoming official.”

 

Dayton Daily News: Ohio Senate OK’s softer graduation rules for Class of 2018

“The Ohio Senate on Wednesday approved alternate pathways to graduation for Class of 2018 students who don’t pass state tests, as part of the state budget bill.  That sets up a conference committee debate in the coming week with members of the Ohio House, who did not include any such provision in their version of the budget.”

 

Associated Press: Ohio’s official budget gap exceeds $1B over 2 years

“Final estimates place Ohio’s projected budget shortfall at more than $1 billion.  Legislative budget analysts told the opening day of a conference committee working to meet a June 30 budget deadline that tax revenues are expected to lag projections by $1.02 billion over the two-year budget cycle.”

 

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

Passed by the Senate

HB124 Brenner/Carfagna

The legislation provides a fix for the Delaware Area Career Center levy that was placed on the ballot in only one of the counties in which the district has territory.  The bill now heads to the governor for his signature.

 

Passed by the House

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey

This bill creates academic standards in computer science and allows students to substitute computer science for a math or science course to fulfill graduation requirements.

 

House Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, reported out of committee

This bill requires schools to include instruction in cursive handwriting. 

HB166 & SB3

These bills would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system to better prepare Ohioans to enter in-demand jobs, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week. The bills were amended to allow for-profit teacher training programs to operate in Ohio.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

SB8 Gardner/Terhar, reported out of committee

This bill requires the School Facilities Commission to create a program to assist districts in purchasing technology, including improvements in security measures.

HB21 Hambley

A substitute version of HB21 was accepted and the LSC analysis of the changes can be viewed here. This bill outlines the process of verification for community school enrollments.

HB200 Koehler

This legislation would eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and instead create an income-based program available to students whose family income is at or below 400 percent of federal poverty guidelines.  The committee adopted a substitute measure to cap enrollment to 60 thousand students and return unused money back to the state.   The LSC analysis of the changes can be viewed here.

HB220 Leland

Sponsor testimony was given on HB220 which deals with the use of funds by community and nonpublic schools.  Rep. David Leland said this legislation “will improve charter school transparency and accountability by permitting the state auditor to track all taxpayer money received by private, for-profit schools.”

HB181 Hood/Brinkman

The committee accepted an amendment to the bill’s intention of addressing academic content standards and assessments.  Changes included prohibiting the use of Common Core State Standards, allowing parents to request their student not be retained if the third-grade reading guarantee wasn’t met and restores language requiring end-of-course examinations in American history and government, among others.

 

House Finance Committee

HB102 Brenner, Sponsor testimony

This bill would replace locally levied school district property taxes with a statewide property tax. Representative Andrew Brenner explained that with this piece of legislation “100% of the funding would follow the student, yet leaves local school districts intact.”   With his plan schools would be funded by one statewide property tax rate of 20 mills and dollars generated by an increase in the sales tax from 5.75% to 7.35%.

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Private School Vouchers: The Ohio Lesson

Innovation Ohio has released a detailed analysis of the current voucher system and its impact on students.  The group’s report details the history of the state’s voucher programs and highlights how much has been spent on the initiative.  Some of the findings include:

  • Vouchers now affect children in 83% of Ohio’s school districts
  • Local taxpayers subsidize vouchers with $105 million in locally raised money to make up for districts losing state funding to Ohio’s voucher programs
  • Students who take vouchers perform worse than their public school peers on state assessments
  • Some of the highest performing school districts in the state lose money and students to vouchers, turning the original intent of the program on its head

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Ohio Department of Education is seeking feedback on proposed changes to Ohio’s Learning Standards in science, social studies and financial literacy.  In addition, the survey asks for feedback on newly proposed high school anatomy and physiology standards.  ODE states that this survey is part of an overall effort to fine tune all of Ohio’s Learning Standards based on teachers’ experience with them during the past few years.  The survey will be available for response until July 18.

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: Lowering farmland values means homeowners will pay higher taxes

“A plan by legislative Republicans to give a tax break to farmers would mean higher property taxes for Ohio homeowners and less revenues for schools.   According to an analysis of proposed farmland value changes in the new two-year state budget, Ohio homeowners face more than $60 million in unvoted property tax increases, while schools could face a loss of $58 million in state and local tax revenue […]”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Sen. works to convince that Franklin Co. schools doing fine

“Most Franklin County districts fare worse under the Senate school-funding plan, compared to what the House passed in April as part of the two-year state budget.  But Sen. Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, sent a direct message to the three senators representing most of Franklin County: Things aren’t so bad.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: ECOT laying off staff so school can repay $60 million

“Facing the need to repay $60.4 million from the 2015-16 school year and potentially millions more from last school year, ECOT says it will lay off 350 workers within weeks, about a quarter of its workforce.”
Steubenville Herald-Star: Summer programs get big response

“The newly implemented summer feeding program at Indian Creek Schools has attracted a huge draw, which has surprised and delighted officials.  During Thursday’s regular school board session, Assistant Superintendent John Belt reported that more than 2,000 students had taken advantage of the Seamless Summer Option program within the first nine days.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

U.S. Department of Education Releases Task Form Progress Report & Seeks Public Comment on Regulatory Reform Initiatives

The US Department of Education released the first progress report of the Regulatory Reform Task Force last week.  The Task Force was created in response to the February presidential executive order requiring federal agencies to evaluate existing regulations for potential repeal, replacement or modification.  The Department is seeking public input concerning regulations and policy guidance that they recommend for change or removal.  In her statement, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos stated, “I look forward to the Task Force’s continued work and to hearing from the public as we work to prioritize the needs of students over unnecessary and burdensome requirements.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 19, 2017

OAAE Arts Online
Monday, June 19, 2017

 

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The Ohio Senate released its budget proposal last week as Substitute House Bill 49.  While addressing a state revenue shortfall of close to $1 billion, the proposal adds $154 million in FY18 and $117 million in FY19 for school funding.  However, in last week’s Senate Finance Committee hearing, Barbara Shaner of the Ohio Association of School Business Officials warned that significant cuts in student transportation still exists.  “This is the largest GRF cut in the entire budget and this is for a line item that was woefully underfunded to begin with,” she stated.

The substitute bill also contains many provisions including the elimination of the fourth and sixth grade social studies state assessment and the Resident Educator Program as well the removal of the provision permitting schools to use a paper format for state assessments.  A full Senate vote on SubHB49 is expected Wednesday, June 21, after which the bill will go to a conference committee of the House and Senate to work out the differences. 

The summary of Substitute HB49 can be reviewed here.

 

Associated Press: Senate budget closes $1B gap, adds $6M for opioid crisis

“Senate Republicans in Ohio said Monday that their version of the state budget closes a projected $1 billion gap while preserving essential services and pumping more money into fighting the opioid crisis.

Senate President Larry Obhof said the Senate was proud it “found a way to do more with less,” while acknowledging the causes of Ohio’s lagging revenues are still a bit of a mystery.” 

Cincinnati Enquirer: Would your school lose or gain money under Senate GOP plan?

“Fewer school districts would lose money under Senate Republicans’ plan compared with Gov. John Kasich’s initial proposal.  Of the 610 school districts in Ohio, 238 would gain money, 210 would receive the same amount and 162 would lose money over two years, compared with current 2017 funding. Under the Senate plan, schools statewide would receive 1 percent more each year.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Most Franklin County Districts See Less Money under Senate Budget

“Senate Republicans directed a little more money toward Ohio’s opioid crisis, and their first round of state budget changes left most Franklin County school districts with less money than the House-passed budget.  Anticipating a larger revenue shortfall when new estimates are released in two weeks, Senate leaders say the revised two-year budget that takes effect July 1 is crafted to close a projected $1 billion revenue gap — $200 million more than the hole Gov. John Kasich’s budget office suggested in April that lawmakers should close.”

Columbus Dispatch: GOP Drops Kasich-Requested Funds for Local Innovation

“Programs that Gov. John Kasich has advocated in recent years to spark innovation and shared services among communities and schools would die under the state Senate’s proposed budget changes.  Senate President Larry Obhof, R-Medina, said the changes proposed this week were not pain-free as Republicans crafted a two-year budget designed to cover a potential $1 billion shortfall in tax revenue.”

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

June 12 & 13

Proposed Assessment Structure Changes

State Superintendent, Paolo DeMaria, presented his recommendations for modifying Ohio’s Assessment Structure to the State Board of Education last week.  DeMaria’s recommendations are as follows:

  1. Eliminate the fourth grade social studies assessment
  2. Eliminate the English Language Arts I high school end-of-course assessment
  3. Eliminate the American Government high school end-of-course assessment
  4. Eliminate the requirement to have a nationally recognized jobs skills assessment component as part of the industry-recognized credential based diploma option (currently WorkKeys)

Changes in law would need to be made by the Ohio General Assembly to enact any assessment recommendations. 

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: No more art, music and gym tests just to grade teachers? How Ohio could change testing under new proposal

“Large amounts of standardized testing that Ohio’s students grind through each year would be cut if legislators allow a few changes proposed by State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria.  The largest change would come by adjusting Ohio’s teacher evaluations, which have forced districts to test students in subjects like art, music, gym, and elementary school science and social studies, just to see how much they learn under a teacher in a school year.”

Dayton Daily News: Change School Tests Again, Says Ohio State Superintendent

“Ohio schools Superintendent Paolo DeMaria recommended a reduction in student testing at both the state and school level Monday, but did not go as far as his advisory committee had suggested.

His specific proposals to change state testing, rolled out in a presentation to the state board of education, are not immediate, as they would require legislators to approve changes in Ohio law.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State superintendent proposes cuts in Ohio’s state tests

“State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria has recommended significant cuts in state-required testing of students, slashing mandated tests closer to just federal requirements. The recommendations, proposed to the state school board this morning, would end some tests that affect state graduation requirements and state report cards for schools and districts.”

 

Board Votes to Recover ECOT Funds

The Board voted 14-1 to accept a hearing officer’s report that concluded the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) had inflated attendance numbers and owed the state $60 million.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State school board votes to recover $60 million from ECOT online school

“The state school board voted today to order the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), Ohio’s largest charter school, to repay $60 million to the state.  The 14-1 vote comes nine months after an attendance review by the Ohio Department of Education found that the school was paid for 9,000 more students last school year than the school could document.”

Columbus Dispatch: ECOT ordered to repay $60 million for inflating attendance

“Republicans and Democrats, school-choice proponents and opponents, appointees of Gov. John Kasich and those elected independently agreed Monday: Online school giant ECOT must repay $60 million in state aid for grossly inflating its attendance figures.”

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

SB151 (Senator Site) and companion bill HB242 (Representative Carfagna): to permit SERS to grant reduced cost-of-living adjustments

 

Senate Insurance and Financial Institutions Committee Chair: Hottinger

Senator Sites gave sponsor testimony on a bill that would allow the School Employees Retirement System (SERS) to grant reduced cost-of-living adjustments.  Sites testified that with this piece of legislation the “pension fund will be in a much better position to withstand another market downturn like that of 2008, protecting the long-term health of the System”.

 

House Aging and Long Term Care Committee Chair: Arndt

The House Aging and Long Term Care Committee heard opponent testimony on the companion bill of SB151, HB242.   Service Employees International Union (SEIU) president Becky Williams testified that because members in the SERS pension fund are the lowest-paid of the five public pensions, averaging about $24,000 per year, they depend on the annual cost of living increase to survive.  “A cost-of-living adjustment freeze for retirees authorized by the SERS Board could mean having to choose between food on the table, refilling a prescription or keeping the lights on for our retirees”, Williams wrote in her testimony.

  

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio’s public-employee pensions face cutbacks

“Collectively, Ohio’s five public pension funds have $192 billion in assets and last year paid out more than $15 billion in pension benefits and $1.1 billion in health-care benefits. They are not required by law to provide health insurance, but all five do. Whether they will in the future is uncertain.”

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, June 20

3:00 p.m., Room 121

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB220 Leland, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Regards use of funds by community and nonpublic schools

 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program

 

HB154 Smith, R./Manning, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid Program

 

HB235 Gavarone, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Regards procedures under Every Student Succeeds Act

 

HB200 Koehler, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB21 Hambley, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Verify community school enrollments

 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Address academic content standards and assessments

 

Wednesday, June 21

11:00 a.m., Room 115

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Require instruction in cursive handwriting

 

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Revise workforce development laws

 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

HB240 Barnes, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Require state higher ed to adopt sex offense policies

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Brookings: How Is Policy Affecting Classroom Instruction?

“This paper uses new state-representative teacher survey data to characterize the degree of standards implementation across three states—Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas. It investigates teachers’ perceptions of the extent to which the policy environment supports them to implement the standards. A great deal of variation in perceptions of policy was found, with Ohio teachers perceiving policy to be less supportive than Kentucky or Texas teachers.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

US News & World Report: Education Budget Hearing Exposes Chasm between GOP and Trump

“When Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos testified before a Senate appropriations subcommittee Tuesday regarding the president’s budget proposal, her remarks that private schools must follow federal law if they receive federal funding received the lion’s share of attention.  But the hearing, during which nearly every GOP members criticized aspects of the spending plan, also exposed just how far apart the Trump administration’s education agenda is with that of Republicans in Congress, perhaps foreshadowing how likely – or not – the White House is to achieve any of its policy priorities.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 12, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

Details on the Senate’s version of HB49, the FY 18-19 budget bill, are to be released today, June 12, during an 11:00 a.m. news conference streamed on the Ohio Channel.  The substitute bill will then be the focus of this afternoon’s Senate Finance Committee session at 2:30 p.m. and is tentatively scheduled to go before the full Senate for a vote the week of June 19.    

Public testimony on the Senate’s substitute bill is scheduled for Tuesday, June 13 (11:00 a.m.), Wednesday, June 14 (10:30 a.m.) and Thursday, June 15 (1:00 p.m. or after session). Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing, oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

Columbus Dispatch: State tax take continues to fall, complicating Ohio budget outlook

“State tax collections continued to fall short of expectations in May, raising the specter that lawmakers may have to patch a bigger-than-anticipated hole as they craft the new two-year budget.  The Senate already needed to come up with more money and cuts to account for a shortfall estimated to be at least $800 million — about $170 million more than House-passed reductions. Tuesday’s numbers do not make its work any easier.”

 

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (ESSA)

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (OAAE) Recommendations for Revised ESSA Plan for Ohio

The OAAE and several other statewide stakeholder organizations believe that there are many opportunities for Ohio’s ESSA Plan to directly support arts education programs and a well-rounded education for Ohio’s students.  After providing recommendations about the February 2, 2017 draft consolidated plan, we had hoped that there would be more emphasis on a well-rounded education, including the arts, in the revised consolidated plan.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) approved in 1965 was part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty” and above all, represented a commitment to support equal access to quality educational programs and a well-rounded curriculum for all children.  ESSA supports efforts to achieve this goal by providing states and local educational agency (LEAs) with federal leadership, resources, and policy support to make it possible for students to achieve more than standards in reading, math, and science.

Ohio’s February 2017 draft ESSA plan addressed support for a well-rounded education in Section 6:  Well-Rounded and Supportive Education for Students, on page 93, stating that Ohio will ensure that students have access to a well-rounded education through implementation of Ohio’s Learning Standards and model curriculumWhile the March 2017 revisions to the federal template for state plans eliminated the requirement that State Education Agencies describe strategies to support LEAs in providing “equitable access to a well-rounded education,” there are still requirements in the federal law that support student access to a well-rounded education, which could be emphasized in Ohio’s revised consolidated plan to guide and support districts and schools.

The OAAE has made specific recommendations to strengthen support for a well-rounded education in latest draft of Ohio’s consolidated plan for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act.   Read the recommendations in our June 11, 2017 letter to the State Board of Education.

In response to stakeholder concern following the release of Ohio’s draft ESSA plan in February 2017, the Ohio Department of Education decided to hold off submitting a final plan to the federal government until September, allowing time for further review of stakeholder input. A revised timeline called for the State Board of Education to approve a final plan at their July meeting, and send it to Governor Kasich for comment by August 18. Ohio must submit its plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act to the US Department of Education by September 18, 2017.

 

NEW REPORT – Education Commission of the States 

ESSA: Mapping opportunities for the arts This special report highlights the ways states and districts can engage the arts in the ongoing work of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

 

EdWeek Market Brief:  Inside ESSA: What It Means for Arts Studies

“There’s been a lot written about the new flexibility afforded states and districts under the Every Student Succeeds Act. A new report suggests that added leeway may pay dividends for arts education, and it offers a de-facto guide to the sections of the federal statute that may benefit that area of the curriculum.  Arts education is an area that supporters say tends to get kicked around and neglected when budgets are tight, and when schools are focused on improving scores on high-stakes tests in core academic areas.”

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee Chair: Duffey

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB58 Brenner/Slaby 4th Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

Cursive handwriting was removed from state learning standards in 2010 when Common Core was introduced. This bill would add it back into the standards starting with the 2018-19 school year.  Opponents voiced concern that such mandates from the state are unnecessary.  In written testimony, the Ohio School Boards Association, Buckeye Association of School Administrators and Ohio Association of School Business Officials wrote “we oppose state and federal mandates that require school districts to devote limited resources and time to such requirements. As such, we cannot support HB58.”

HB166 Reineke/Cupp & SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

These bills would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system to better prepare Ohioans to enter in-demand jobs, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB200 Koehler, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Both proponent and opponent testimony was given on HB200.  This bill would eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and instead create an income-based program available to students whose family income is at or below 400 percent of federal poverty guidelines.  Opposition testimony was presented by Scott DiMauro, Vice President of the Ohio Education Association (OEA).  DiMauro voiced concern on the expansion of voucher programs indicating it would “drain needed resources from the approximately 90% of students who attend Ohio’s local public schools”.  

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, Passed out of committee

This bill would allow students to substitute computer science courses for Algebra II in districts that have adopted the permissive standards, require educator qualifications regarding computer science, and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year that includes e-schools.

HB325 Gavarone, Sponsor testimony

The goal of this legislation is to ensure the General Assembly has input in the state’s final education plan for the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

Sub SB8 Gardner/Terhar, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

As with its companion measure, HB37, this legislation requires the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, June 12

8:00 a.m., Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Tuesday, June 13

8:00 a.m., Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

 

11:00 a.m., Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 7th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

1:00 p.m., Room 121

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB235 Gavarone, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Regards procedures under Every Student Succeeds Act 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program 

HB200 Koehler, 4th Hearing, Interested Party Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Address academic content standards and assessments

 

Wednesday, June 14

10:30 a.m., Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 8th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

Thursday, June 15

1:30 p.m., (or after session), Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 9th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Dayton Daily News: School employees protest proposed benefit cuts today at statehouse

“School bus drivers, grounds keepers, secretaries and other retirees marched on the Ohio Statehouse on Wednesday, loudly protesting planned cuts to their public pensions.  A few hundred protesters organized by the Ohio Association of Public School Employees voiced opposition to pending bills that call for cuts to the cost of living adjustment given to retirees in the School Employees Retirement System. Pension officials say the changes are needed to shore up the system finances.”

 

Akron Beacon Journal: Concerned Akron council asks Trump, Congress and state legislators to have a little heart

“Akron City Council spent part of its legislative session Monday asking state and federal authorities to reconsider their own legislation.  In three separate resolutions, council asked President Donald Trump and Congress to go back to the drawing board on a federal budget proposal that threatens “the most vulnerable among us,” opposed the United States’ recent withdrawal from the Paris Agreement on Climate Control, and asked Ohio Gov. John Kasich not to force local parks to participate in oil and gas drilling operations.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 5, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The state of Ohio revenue results for the month of May are expected soon and many fear the Senate will have a larger budget shortfall than the anticipated $800 million.  The Senate is working to pass HB49, the state’s biennial budget, by the deadline of June 30.  

Toledo Blade: Senate Democrats seek public’s help on Ohio budget

“Lacking the votes to go it alone, Ohio Senate Democrats on Thursday held a forum hoping to enlist the public’s help in their uphill battle to influence the state’s next two-year budget.  Democrats plan to offer numerous amendments on such things as bolstering the fight against the state’s escalating addiction epidemic, removing a House amendment blocking Toledo from enforcing its new lead law, and increasing funding for schools and local governments.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Senate Eyes Changes to Medicaid, School Funding

“Among its budget changes, the Ohio Senate is not expected to force the Kasich administration to ask permission before spending any money on Medicaid expansion, and is looking to reduce the number of schools facing funding cuts.  About 350 districts face state funding reductions under the House-passed budget. Senate President Larry Obhof, R-Medina, said a few weeks ago he hoped to ensure none of them faced cuts. He did not go that far today.”

 

Senate Finance Committee

The Senate Finance Committee heard reports from each Senate Finance Subcommittee chair as well as continued to hear testimony on HB49. Primary and Secondary Education Finance Subcommittee Chair Sen. Cliff Hite (R-Findlay) testified that 121 witnesses appeared before the subcommittee with the majority voicing concern on the impact of the proposed budget for their school district.   A substitute bill is expected during the week of June 12.

Public testimony continues this week with two days left, Tuesday, June 6 (11:00 a.m.) and Wednesday, June 7 (11:00 a.m.).  Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing; oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

 

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

The committee heard testimony on the following: 

HB176 Thompson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Nearly 15 people testified in favor of HB176 which would reduce the number of exams, eliminate state teacher and principal evaluation systems, and allow individual school districts to set learning standards.

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 4th Hearing, All Testimony

Written testimony was submitted on HB170 which would develop optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science, revise educator qualifications regarding computer science as well as create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.  

HB154 Smith/Manning, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

This legislation would establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid program which would provide grants and loans to cover the cost of short-term programs leading to commercial driver’s licenses.

HB200 Koehler, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

The aim of this legislation is to eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB203 Sponsor testimony from Rep. John Barnes (D-Cleveland)

This bill would establish a youth summer jobs ‘pledging initiative’ to increase access to summer employment opportunities for high school and college youth in Ohio.

HB217 Sponsor testimony from Rep. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell) 

This bill will prohibit institutions of higher education from requiring prospective students to disclose disciplinary actions on their applications for admission.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, June 6

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Address computer science curriculum 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program 

HB200 Koehler, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

Wednesday, June 7

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, 4th Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

Require instruction in cursive handwriting 

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Revise workforce development laws 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

 

Chillicothe Gazette: City Schools Adjusting STEAM Plans

“More students will have access to the new Chillicothe City Schools’ Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Innovation Academy during the next school year than originally thought.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Kids’ Learning Doesn’t Have to Slide over Summer

“Summer is a time to try things that can’t happen in a classroom, and even better, warding off academic atrophy doesn’t have to cost much, if anything.”

 

AP/Columbus Dispatch: Ohio School District Fights High Chronic Absenteeism Rate

“An Ohio school district is fighting chronic absenteeism rates that see nearly one in four students missing multiple days of school a year. About 24 percent of students in Lorain city schools in northern Ohio are chronically absent, meaning students miss about 18 days a year.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: ACT Official Won’t Explain Ohio Students’ Test Snafu Due to “Security” 

“Hundreds of students in Reynoldsburg and several other Ohio school districts had their ACT scores invalidated, but state officials are urging the college-entrance-testing company to reconsider.”

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT  (ESSA)

 

ODE: Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Draft Sections of Template

As draft sections of the Ohio ESSA plan are presented to the State Board for discussion, they will be posted to the ESSA page of the ODE website.  ODE is still welcoming comments on the drafts and can be submitted to essa@education.ohio.gov.  Final revisions of the Ohio ESSA plan will be presented to the State Board at its meeting July 10 and 11, 2017.

 

ODE: Remediation-Free Scores for “New” SAT Set

“Students who took College Board’s SAT after March 1, 2016, may use their scores to meet the college and career readiness pathway to graduation. A remediation-free score on the ACT or SAT is one option students may use to meet the test requirement for graduation. In March 2016, College Board administered a new SAT that uses a different test format, scoring model and score reports.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

President Trump recently released his full budget for FY 2018 which calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education.

AP: Trump Budget Cuts Aimed at Safety-Net Programs Worries Advocates for Minority Communities

“It would defund and cut at least 10 percent of key civil rights enforcement positions across the government, including positions at the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Legal Services Corporation, which helped more than 2 million low-income individuals with legal representation last year, advocates said.”

 

NPR: Why It’s So Hard to Know Whether School Choice Is Working

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm?  Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It’s hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students.”

 

USDOE: USDOE Launches New IDEA Website

“The U.S. Department of Education recently launched a new website dedicated to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos directed the Department to expedite the development of a new, updated and more robust site specific to the IDEA after the Department’s Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 (Legacy) site experienced a prolonged outage in February due to technical issues.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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