Arts On Line Education Update April 16, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Education and Career Readiness Committee (Chair: Brenner)

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week: 

Proponent testimony on HB540 TEACHER EVALUATIONS (Gavarone, Manning) With regard to teacher evaluations.

Several proponents testified last week in favor of the teacher evaluation changes in HB 540.  Supporters included Melissa Cropper, president of the Ohio Federation of Teachers, and Jonathan Juravich, an elementary school art teacher who is also the Department of Education’s 2018 Ohio Teacher of the year.

“Ohio teachers are currently working under an evaluation system that uses testing data in an inappropriate and ineffective way to evaluate teachers by counting test results as a percentage of a teacher’s evaluation,” Cropper said.

The legislation consists of recommendations provided by the Educator Standards Board after reviewing the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System.

The proposal would include the following changes:

  1. Update OTES Rubric to embed student growth indicators, clarify descriptors to decrease redundancy, and improve clarity in the distinctions between performance levels.
  1. Student growth data will be linked with improving instruction, as opposed to an isolated evaluation factor linked to an arbitrary percentage.
  1. Shared attribution would be removed as it does not accurately measure teacher performance or student growth because of the use of assessments for a group of students that the educator does not teach.
  1. Alternative framework components like student portfolios, student surveys, peer review, self-evaluation, and district-determined measures, will remain as optional sources of evidence of teacher effectiveness.
  1. For teachers on a full evaluation cycle, the two required formal observations and optional number of walkthroughs will be maintained, along with a required end of annual cycle conference with the evaluator.
  1. The off-year evaluation schedule for teachers rated skilled or accomplished will be maintained but adds the requirement of a conference in off-years for skilled and accomplished teachers to discuss professional growth and progress toward goals. There would also be a requirement for teachers who are rated as skilled to submit professional growth plans developed with their evaluations in off years.

“HB540 would make the OTES process more coherent,” said Mr. Juravich. “By using student growth measures as a source of evidence in the conversations between educator and evaluator, we are emphasizing the importance of our impact on our students.”

 

Sponsor testimony on HB549 SCHOOL YEAR (Arndt) To generally require public and chartered nonpublic schools to open for instruction after Labor Day.

Bill sponsor Rep. Steven Arndt (R-Port Clinton) said the measure to require schools to begin after Labor Day would give students a boost by allowing school-age children opportunities to pursue work experiences and address the state’s “workforce shortage and skills gap.” He also noted that a later starting date would keep students out of school during the hottest days of the year.

Arndt acknowledge the concern of passing another state mandate down to schools, but said he added a provision that would allow local control. School Boards can opt out of the mandate if they conduct one local hearing at least one month before the start date to allow the public to voice their concern.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB591 SCHOOL REPORT CARDS (Duffey) To revise the state report card rating system for school districts and public schools.

Representative Mike Duffey laid out a plan for an Ohio School Report Card reform last week. Duffey testified that the current report card system left districts frustrated, damaged teacher morale, and confused parents and the community. His proposal outlined the principles the new report card would include to make it more effective than the current one:

  • Dashboard approach: precise information presented in an intuitive format for natural response
  • Understandable: use the simplest methodologies that still get the job done/illustrate the metric
  • Transparent: educators/public can do the math themselves if they want, which leads to trust
  • Parent-centric: present the data to parents so they see how their children are likely to do, as opposed to looking at all children generally

Duffey indicated his work in developing HB591 has included discussions with many partners including the Joint Education Oversight Committee, State Board of Education members, the Ohio Department of Education, various school associations and parents.  The full presentation on the proposed changes can be reviewed here.

 

Passed by the House:

  • HB318 (LaTourette, Patterson) It establishes qualifications and training for school resource offices and includes a $10 million school safety training grant.
  • HB360 (Greenspan) The bill sets a standard framework for schools to use an even-handed approach to address bullying.

  

Senate Education Committee (Chair: Lehner)

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

All testimony on HB21 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS (Hambley) Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

The committee heard several proposed amendments from witnesses. Among them was Michael Uhrin, president of Grove City-based K12 School Consultants, who asked for amendments that would allow local school districts to join in the verification process.  “Charter schools may not have the necessary staff to review court and other legal documents,” he said. “Many public schools have legal staff to review these documents.”

HB21 takes the onus of verifying residency of community school students from public schools and would instead require charter schools to keep track of the home districts in which their students reside. HB21 changes the obligation from the public schools to community schools on the foundation that each school should only be responsible for verifying the residency of the students they serve.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB87 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS (Roegner) Regarding public moneys returned to the state as a result of a finding for recovery issued pursuant to an audit of a community school.

Rep. Kristina Roegner told the committee that HB87 provides the Department of Education with specific guidance on distributing funds returned to the state from a community school as the result of a finding for recovery from the Auditor of State.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB438: ESC BOARDS (Hambley, Kick) To permit the addition of appointed members to educational service center boards and to permit a local school district to sever its territory from one educational service center and annex that territory to an adjacent service center under specified conditions.

Co-sponsors Rep. Steve Hambley and Rep. Darrell Kick both testified and explained the three provisions of the bill. HB438 passed the House with a unanimous vote last month.

 

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

April 9 & 10 Meeting Recap

In-School Health Care Initiative

Superintendent Paolo DeMaria discussed an initiative intended to give support to school districts who want to establish in-house health care. DeMaria said ODE has been working with the Ohio Departments of Health and Jobs & Family Services as well as other health care organizations to develop the School-Based Health Care Support Toolkit. The draft tool kit will be available in May with the goal of having services ready to support schools by September.

“Let’s work together to help improve the health status of students in the interest of helping them become better learners,” DeMaria said Monday. “We know a lot about the interdependency between student health and academic performance. Whether it’s asthma, diabetes, a tooth ache, not having corrective eyewear — these have huge impacts on their readiness and ability to participate.” The program will focus on patient management, care coordination and mental health.

 

Chronic Absenteeism on Ohio School Report Cards

The Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee voted in favor of adding chronic absenteeism improvement as an indicator on the schools’ state report cards. The new measurement is part of Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan and will look at absentee rates with a focus on measuring improvement in the reduction of students missing regularly. Chronic Absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the school year for any reason, which is approximately 18 days of school. Currently Ohio’s rate is 16.9 percent.

Schools can meet the new indicator in one of two pathways ways. The first is by reaching a target goal set by the state. This goal would start at an absentee rate of 13.6 percent and drop each year to the final goal of 5 percent for the 2025-2026 school year. The second pathway would be for schools to see incremental improvement based on their current absentee rate, or Baseline Chronic Absenteeism Improvement Standard. For schools with a 36.7 percent or higher chronic absenteeism rate, they would need to see a 1.1 percent decrease. For schools with an absenteeism rate of 36.7 percent  or lower, they would need to improve by 3 percent.

The chronic absenteeism indicator will be up for full board approval in May and inclusion on the next round of state report cards in the upcoming 2018-2019 school year.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE Seeks Public Comment on Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education

The last chance to submit comment on the recently released draft of the state’s five-year strategic plan is this week. The final regional community conversation to discuss the plan directly with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Ohio Department of Education staff is scheduled for Tuesday, April 17 in Hamilton County.

The Ohio Department of Education and State Board of Education’s plan is a tool to inform policy development at the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools. More than 150 preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, and philanthropic organizations worked collaboratively over the last six months to develop the plan.

For more information and to register for the last regional community comment session, click on the following link: Hamilton County: April 17, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

 

Dayton Daily News: State considers new 5-year education plan that shifts away from tests

“The Ohio Department of Education is constructing a new five-year strategic plan — dubbed Each Child = Our Future — aimed at building a more effective state education system to help position students for success upon graduation. A draft version of the plan earned praise from some for moving away from emphasizing test results.”

Lima News: Meeting held in Wapak to discuss Ohio’s education plan

“The future of Ohio’s education is being discussed across the state as the State Board of Education holds stakeholder meetings on a new strategic plan. A meeting held Wednesday at Wapakoneta High School gave people a chance to weigh in on a draft strategic plan that is being considered.”

 

 

OHIO NEWS

The National Assessment of Educational Progress’s (NAEP) latest National Report Card was recently released and has Ohio at the same level as the past couple years. The NAEP is the largest continuing and nationally representative assessment of what our nation’s students know and can do in subjects such as mathematics, reading, science, and writing. Standard administration practices are implemented to provide a common measure of student achievement.

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio and Cleveland gain little on “Nation’s Report Card,” as national scores stay flat

“Ohio and other states gained little to nothing on the national test last year that serves as the “Nation’s Report Card,” showing no significant improvements in reading or math, even as states continue pressing education reform efforts like more aggressive teacher evaluations and the shift to new Common Core-based standards.”


Columbus Dispatch: Ohio reading, math scores unchanged on national test

“U.S. eighth-graders in 2017 were slightly better readers than the eighth-graders of 2015. But other than that bright spot, national test scores on reading and math haven’t budged in a few years. Likewise, Ohio’s scores didn’t really move in the two years since fourth- and eighth-graders last took the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the results of which were released early Tuesday. This after results had dipped a little in 2015.”

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

stwebsite_1

2018 AEP Annual Convening: Call for Session Proposals 

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1. 

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Portrait of an Arts Advocate: David Bell

David Bell 14 (002)David Bell
Co-Chair, Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education
Instructor, Miami University 
Retired, Public School High School Choir Teacher

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: I grew up as a “PK” or “Preacher’s Kid.” My father was a minister and my mother was a Kindergarten teacher. As a child, I spent countless hours hanging around the church waiting for my parents to finish up meetings. Music was the part of that environment that first grabbed my attention as an overly-energetic, primary student. My mother had basic piano skills and we would often play duets together. My father also had music skills and, prior to my birth, played percussion in the West Point Marching Band during WWII.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: The moment that comes to mind was the first opportunity my high school students had to perform with Maestro Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops. We were on the program to perform and record the “Dedication and Wind Song,” from the Disney movie, “Mighty Joe Young,”  (Mega Movies, Telarc Digital, 2000).  As these students, many of whom had never before had the opportunity to visit Cincinnati’s Music Hall, stood on the stage preparing to rehearse with Maestro Kunzel, I realized that for the rest of their lives they would return to that special place, not as “guests,” but rather as “owners” of an irreplaceable musical memory and an intimate connection with a world-class orchestra. I realize now how brilliant Erich Kunzel, and his successor, John Morris Russell, are, to bring these students to the stage first as active participants, rather than passive audience members.

Q. How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A:  Since retiring from 35 years of public school teaching, I have been working with student teachers for the past four years at Miami University, Oxford, and teaching a class designed to improve student literacy through the musical and visual arts. I am also currently serving as Co-Chair for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education. The GCAAE is an organization of the arts education administrators for Cincinnati area arts organizations, such as the Cincinnati Symphony, Ballet, Art Museum, Shakespeare Theatre, etc., formed to “advocate for the arts in people’s lives.” GCAAE is a pilot member of the Local Arts Education Network of the Americans for the Arts.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: I have always been intrigued by the power of sensory engagement, particularly in video games. Video games trigger neurological chemical responses that help to raise the level of engagement in processes that are often like learning processes that occur in the classroom. Recently, I have been investigating ways that we can capitalize upon neuro-sensory immersion to promote student engagement in the classroom. This is, undoubtedly, one of the great strengths of arts infusion in education and lesson planning.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: The choir director at our church, Rev. Paul Waters, was a talented organist who had graduated from Northwestern University and built an enormous choir program at the church where my father was assigned. The holidays were memorable times when all the singers would join together in one massed choir with brass, organ, hand bells, and percussion. Dr. Waters would conduct the combined forces of over 350 people by simply nodding his head while playing at the organ keyboard. It was a pivotal time when I learned the ability of music to overpower the spoken word and speak directly to the heart.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: One of the best tips I learned about advocacy was from a former Winton Woods City Schools Superintendent. Dr. Thomas Richey. As he was helping me to prepare to testify for the Ohio State School Board, he shared that his most effective approach was to figure out “who influences the influencers?” He taught me not to worry so much about directly influencing a legislator or elected official, but think about who influences them–it may be their spouse, their family, their staff, their funders, etc. Build a relationship with the person who influences the influencer and help them to see the value of strong arts education through your personalized lens.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you’d like to submit your information, or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

 

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ACTION ALERT: Urgent Action Required on HB512

OAAE urges you to contact the members of the House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee, chaired by Representative Louis Blessing III (see the contact information below), with a message opposing HB512 (Reineke) Consolidate Career-Education Governance. 

Representative Bill Reineke introduced HB512 Consolidate Career-Education Governance on February 14, 2018. The bill would transfer, with some exceptions, the current duties of the State Board of Education, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Ohio Department of Education, the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation, and the Department of Higher Education to a new Department of Learning and Achievement (DLA). The proposed new department would control over 53 percent of the General Revenue Fund.

The bill substantially reduces the responsibilities of the State Board of Education and Superintendent of Public Instruction; eliminates the Ohio Board of Regents and the Chancellor of Higher Education; and allows the governor to appoint a director for the new Department of Learning and Achievement, giving the governor complete control over the development and implementation of prek-16 education policy.

Use the template below and add personal comments and examples about why a nonpartisan and independent State Board of Education is important to your work, or compose your own message using the information provided.

Thank you for supporting this Action Alert.


MESSAGE

The Honorable Louis Blessing III (or other committee member)
Chair
House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee
Ohio House

April 9, 2018

Dear Representative Blessing:

My name is ………. and I have been teaching ………. in the ……….School District for ………. years.

I appreciate this opportunity to express my opposition to HB512, which would eliminate the policy-making role of the State Board of Education and create a huge state agency that would control over 53 percent of the General Revenue Fund!

I oppose HB512, because I believe the bill would diminish the public’s ability to participate in preK-12 education policy development, decision making, and rule making by consolidating education departments and eliminating the State Board of Education’s policy-making authority.

Ohio has a strong tradition of public involvement in the development of preK-12 education policy. After Ohio voters approved in 1953 Article VI Section 4, a constitutional amendment that created the State Board of Education and abolished the existing office of superintendent of public instruction that was appointed by the governor, the General Assembly passed a law creating an elected State Board of Education.

The purpose of Article VI Section 4 was to create a non-partisan state board of education, which would act independently from the governor’s office, and facilitate the participation of parents, students, teachers, administrators, and business and community members in the development and implementation of education policies. An independent state board could limit the influence of politics on K-12 education policy and the “churn” associated with adopting the latest “education reform of the day,” and establish processes to develop long-range education goals for the state.

According to the National Association of State Boards of Education, state boards of education serve as “unbiased brokers” for education decision making; advocate for quality education programs and student access to educational opportunities; and act as a liaison between educators, schools, elected officials, business and civic groups to build consensus among education stakeholders. In its role as a consensus builder a non-partisan state board of education ensures that the public voice is represented in decisions about public education.

It is hard to imagine how a voice for the children of Ohio would be represented in the proposed Department of Learning and Achievement (DLA) without a mechanism for the public to influence the policy-making process comparable to the public meetings and committee structure of the current State Board of Education.

I urge the committee to oppose HB512, and to restore an elected state board of education to serve as an advocate for preK-12 education at the state level, and a liaison between constituents and policy makers.

Thank you for the opportunity comment on HB512.

Sincerely,

……………..


CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE
HOUSE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY AND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

Louis W. Blessing III (R) – Chair rep29@ohiohouse.gov

William Reineke (R) – Vice Chair rep88@ohiohouse.gov

Tim Ginter (R) rep05@ohiohouse.gov

Scott Lipps (R) rep62@ohiohouse.gov

Riordan McClain (R) rep87@ohiohouse.gov

Dorothy Pelanda (R) rep86@ohiohouse.gov

Bill Seitz (R) rep30@ohiohouse.gov

Ryan Smith (R) rep93@ohiohouse.gov

Kathleen Clyde (D) – Ranking Minority Member rep75@ohiohouse.gov

Brigid Kelly (D) rep31@ohiohouse.gov

Bernadine Kent (D) rep25@ohiohouse.gov

Martin Sweeney (D) rep14@ohiohouse.gov


BACKGROUND 

Ohio voters approved on November 3, 1953 Article VI Section 4, a constitutional amendment that created a state board of education, a superintendent of public instruction appointed by the state board, and abolished the existing office of superintendent of public instruction appointed by the governor. (1)

The purpose of Article VI Section 4 was to create a non-partisan state board of education, which would act independently from the governor’s office, and insulate education policy making from politics. An elected state board would also facilitate the participation of parents, students, teachers, administrators, and business and community members in the development and implementation of education policies. (2)

Following the adoption of Article VI Section 4, the General Assembly approved legislation to create an elected state board of education, which would appoint a superintendent of public instruction. The elected state board was replaced in 1995 by a 19-member board, which includes 11 elected and 8 members appointed by the governor. The change was made after the State Board of Education defied Governor George Voinovich, and voted against appealing the first DeRolph school funding decision, issued by Judge Linton Lewis, Perry County Court of Common Pleas in July 1994. (3) The language to create an all-appointed state board was included in the biennial budget bill, 121-HB117, introduced in January 1995. Citizens vigorously opposed the all-appointed board, which led to a compromise and the creation of the current hybrid board. This legislative change was later challenged in the courts, based on the single subject rule, and eventually separate legislation, HB711, was signed into law by Governor Taft in July 2000, affirming the new composition of the state board.

Representative Bill Reineke introduced on February 14, 2018 House Bill 512 Consolidate Career-Education Governance. The bill transfers, with some exceptions, the current duties of the State Board of Education, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Ohio Department of Education, the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation, and the Department of Higher Education to a new Department of Learning and Achievement (DLA). The proposed new department would control over 53 percent of the General Revenue Fund.

The bill substantially reduces the responsibilities of the State Board of Education and Superintendent of Public Instruction; eliminates the Ohio Board of Regents and the Chancellor of Higher Education; and allows the governor to appoint a director for the new Department of Learning and Achievement.

Currently the State Board of Education, the Ohio Department of Education, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction oversee primary and secondary education, while the Chancellor and the Department of Higher Education oversee higher education, including 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities, career technical schools, and adult education. The Ohio Board of Regents serves as an advisory board to the Chancellor, but, according to the Columbus Dispatch, hasn’t met in over a year, because it doesn’t have enough members to make a quorum. The governor appoints the nine members of the Ohio Board of Regents. (4)

Both Republican and Democratic governors have advocated for more authority over making education policy, but have been frustrated in attempts, because the requirements for a State Board of Education and Superintendent of Public Instruction are prescribed in the Ohio Constitution, and would require amending the constitution, which is no easy task.

Article VI Section 4 of the Ohio Constitution mandates that, “There shall be a state board of education which shall be selected in such manner and for such terms as shall be provided by law. There shall be a superintendent of public instruction, who shall be appointed by the state board of education. The respective powers and duties of the board and of the superintendent shall be prescribed by law.”

HB512 takes advantage of the constitution’s language allowing the legislature to determine the duties of the State Board and Superintendent. The bill avoids changing the constitution by retaining the current organization of the state board, which has eleven elected members and eight members appointed by the governor, and the position of Superintendent of Public Instruction, but reduces their responsibilities and eliminates their policy-making and rule-making authority.

The State Board of Education would retain authority to revoke a district and/or school charter; issue educator licenses and implement disciplinary actions concerning licenses; determine payments for parents in lieu of transportation; approve territory transfers; hold Chapter 119 administrative proceedings; determine permanent student expulsions; sponsor community schools; oversee the state schools for the deaf and blind; and administer other proceedings.

Formulating policies and developing rules for academic content standards and model curriculum, graduation, accountability, assessment, teacher licensing, higher education, workforce development, etc. would be transferred to the new Department of Learning and Achievement.

The bill has the support of some superintendents and advocates for career-technical education, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, and the Ohio Manufacturers Association. Supporters believe that the bill will align Ohio’s education systems to the meet the current and future employment needs of Ohio, and increase the percentage of Ohioans who complete some post secondary education from the current 43 percent to 65 percent of Ohioans by 2025. (5)

Governor John Kasich also supports the bill, which he believes will give the governor more authority over education policy, and will hold the governor more accountable to the voters for improving education results.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger announced on February 14, 2018 that the bill is a priority for this legislative session, and he hopes that the bill will pass the House before the summer recess.

Statewide public education organizations, including the Ohio School Boards Association, the Buckeye Association of School Administrators, and the Ohio Association of School Business Officials, oppose HB512. They believe that attention to the unique needs of students in grades K-12 in over 600 school districts would be marginalized in an agency that also focuses on higher education and workforce development.

Although voters will still be able to elect members of the State Board from their districts, the policy-making and rule-making authority of the State Board of Education will be greatly reduced, and the public and education stakeholders will lose the ability to influence the rule-making process at the grassroots level through State Board committee meetings and business meetings.

The bill is assigned to the House Governance and Accountability and Oversight Committee, chaired by Representative Louis Blessing III, which began hearings on the bill on February 20, 2018. A substitute bill to address concerns raised by homeschooling advocates is expected to be introduced.

(1) Ohio Amendment 2 1953. Senate Joint Resolution No. 30, Ohio General Assembly, adopted July 14, 1953 at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law Library, HeinOnline, page 1088

(2) Toledo Blade Editorial, November 2, 1953

(3) Hannah News Service. “State Board of Education Will Not Appeal Perry County Decision”, January 12, 1994

(4) Article 6.04 Ohio Constitution

(5) Akron Beacon Journal Editorial Board, “Better than one big state education agency? Getting serious about the fallout of poverty,” February 17, 2018. The 2025 Attainment Goal states “65 percent of Ohioans, ages 25-64, will have a degree, certificate or other postsecondary workforce credential of value in the workplace by 2025.”

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Arts On Line Education Update April 9, 2018

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE  

david bellDavid Bell
Co-Chair, Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education
Instructor, Miami University
Retired, Public School High School Choir Teacher

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: I grew up as a “PK” or “Preacher’s Kid.” My father was a minister and my mother was a Kindergarten teacher. As a child, I spent countless hours hanging around the church waiting for my parents to finish up meetings. Music was the part of that environment that first grabbed my attention as an overly-energetic, primary student. My mother had basic piano skills and we would often play duets together. My father also had music skills and, prior to my birth, played percussion in the West Point Marching Band during WWII.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: The moment that comes to mind was the first opportunity my high school students had to perform with Maestro Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops. We were on the program to perform and record the “Dedication and Wind Song,” from the Disney movie, “Mighty Joe Young,”  (Mega Movies, Telarc Digital, 2000).  As these students, many of whom had never before had the opportunity to visit Cincinnati’s Music Hall, stood on the stage preparing to rehearse with Maestro Kunzel, I realized that for the rest of their lives they would return to that special place, not as “guests,” but rather as “owners” of an irreplaceable musical memory and an intimate connection with a world-class orchestra. I realize now how brilliant Erich Kunzel, and his successor, John Morris Russell, are, to bring these students to the stage first as active participants, rather than passive audience members.

Q. How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A:  Since retiring from 35 years of public school teaching, I have been working with student teachers for the past four years at Miami University, Oxford, and teaching a class designed to improve student literacy through the musical and visual arts. I am also currently serving as Co-Chair for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education. The GCAAE is an organization of the arts education administrators for Cincinnati area arts organizations, such as the Cincinnati Symphony, Ballet, Art Museum, Shakespeare Theatre, etc., formed to “advocate for the arts in people’s lives.” GCAAE is a pilot member of the Local Arts Education Network of the Americans for the Arts.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: I have always been intrigued by the power of sensory engagement, particularly in video games. Video games trigger neurological chemical responses that help to raise the level of engagement in processes that are often like learning processes that occur in the classroom. Recently, I have been investigating ways that we can capitalize upon neuro-sensory immersion to promote student engagement in the classroom. This is, undoubtedly, one of the great strengths of arts infusion in education and lesson planning.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: The choir director at our church, Rev. Paul Waters, was a talented organist who had graduated from Northwestern University and built an enormous choir program at the church where my father was assigned. The holidays were memorable times when all the singers would join together in one massed choir with brass, organ, hand bells, and percussion. Dr. Waters would conduct the combined forces of over 350 people by simply nodding his head while playing at the organ keyboard. It was a pivotal time when I learned the ability of music to overpower the spoken word and speak directly to the heart.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: One of the best tips I learned about advocacy was from a former Winton Woods City Schools Superintendent. Dr. Thomas Richey. As he was helping me to prepare to testify for the Ohio State School Board, he shared that his most effective approach was to figure out “who influences the influencers?” He taught me not to worry so much about directly influencing a legislator or elected official, but think about who influences them–it may be their spouse, their family, their staff, their funders, etc. Build a relationship with the person who influences the influencer and help them to see the value of strong arts education through your personalized lens.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you’d like to submit your information, or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Nominations Open for 2019 Teacher of Year!

The State Board of Education is accepting nominations through Friday, April 13 for the 2019 Ohio Teacher of the Year awards. The Ohio Teacher of the Year award program identifies exceptional teachers statewide and celebrates their effective work in and outside the classroom. Awardees are part of a network of exemplary teachers who are engaged in school improvement initiatives. The board recognizes regional teachers of the year in each of the 11 board districts, and one Ohio Teacher of the Year.

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State school board has a new member: Avon Lake school board President Charles Froehlich

Avon Lake school board President Charles Froehlich is joining the state school board for the rest of this year to fill out the remainder of former board member Kathleen McGervey’s term. McGervey, of Avon, resigned in January, saying she needed more time to care for her mother. That left the remainder of her term, which runs to the end of the year, open.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

April is the Month of the Military Child

Approximately 34,000 Ohio students are members of military families. Frequent moves and family separations brought about by deployments, as well as reintegration issues, can present special challenges for these students. Yet, because of their resilience and ability to deal with life-changing events, military children can be an inspiration and a source of pride for our communities, schools and nation.

 

ODE Seeks Public Comment on Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education

The Ohio Department of Education and State Board of Education has released a working draft of the state’s five-year strategic plan for education for public comment. The plan is a tool to inform policy development at the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools. More than 150 preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, and philanthropic organizations worked collaboratively over the last six months to develop the plan.

There are two specific ways you can share your thoughts and inform the continued development of this plan:

  1. Review the full working draft or the highlights summary and respond to the companion survey between March 12 – April 13, 2018.
  1. Attend one of the regional community conversations to discuss the plan directly with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Ohio Department of Education staff.

Register now to attend a local meeting near you.

Auglaize County: April 11, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Brown County: April 12, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Hamilton County: April 17, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

 

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Updated Analysis on Sub. SB216
OAAE has published an updated analysis on SB216 (Huffman), the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act.  SB216 was passed by the Senate and is now with the House for committee hearings. The bill would affect major areas of education law including teacher evaluations; highly qualified teachers; teacher licensure and employment; substitute teachers; and teachers in career-technical education programs and will eventually impact programs at institutions of higher education that prepare teachers.
These changes may affect teacher quality, the quality of the education programs in our schools, and especially the students, who deserve well-trained teachers in all their classes so that they can achieve at the highest levels.
Arts education advocates generally support the bill’s proposed changes in the teacher evaluation framework in Section 3319.112, including the elimination of shared attribution and student learning objectives for purposes of teacher evaluation.
However, there remain issues of concern to arts education advocates. One is whether the revised the grade band structure for which teacher licensure is received will effectively eliminate the future issuance of the multi-age, preK-12 teaching license. This is the teaching license by far most commonly held by Ohio’s professional pre-K-12 educators who are assigned to teach the specific disciplines of visual arts, music, dance, or theatre/drama. Sub.SB216 leaves this issue unclear, presenting a situation in which not only teacher licensure but also pre-service teacher training programs in institutions of higher education could be significantly affected.
Another issue is what teachers licensed under Sub.SB216’s proposed new preK-5 grade band will be certified to teach. More specifically, it is unclear whether the proposed preK-5 license will certify general educators to teach the arts in the way that the current preK-3 license does. Again, there are many implications here in the areas of pre-service teacher training in university degree programs, teacher hiring practices, and most important, the quality of teaching at all grade levels aligned with Ohio’s Fine Arts Content Standards. Such a certification could undermine the quality of arts education in Ohio.
A solution to these concerns would be an amendment to require that all courses in the arts at all grade levels be taught by a teacher with a multiage preK-12 license in a specific arts discipline of dance, drama, music, or visual art, or an equivalent license in a specific area. Teachers with the multi-age license in the arts can best provide age appropriate instruction, content knowledge, and professional expertise to guide students to achieve at the highest levels in the arts.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, April 9

8:30 a.m. State Board of Education Meeting

Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

 

Tuesday, April 10

8:30 a.m. State Board of Education Meeting

Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

4:00 p.m. House Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

Ohio Statehouse Room 121

  • HB549 (Arndt) Require schools to open after Labor Day  1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony
  • Unspecified legislation from Representative Duffey, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony Pending Introduction and Referral    
  • HB540 (Gavarone/Manning) Regards teacher evaluations  2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony  

 

Wednesday, April 11

3:15 p.m. Senate Education Committee  Chair: Lehner

Ohio Statehouse South Hearing Room

  • HB87 (Roegner) Address money returned to state from community school audit 1st Hearing, Sponsor
  • HB438 (Hambley/Kick) Address composition of educational service centers 1st Hearing, Sponsor
  • HB21 (Hambley) Party Verify community school enrollments 4th Hearing, Proponent/Opponent/Interested 

 

 

OHIO NEWS 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: YOUR VIEW: Don’t change K-12 control in Ohio

“Proponents for converting control of K-12 education in Ohio from the State Board of Education and the Ohio Department of Education to a new state agency overseen by an appointee of the governor have not persuaded the public that’s a good idea.  That is the strong indication of an online poll conducted last week in conjunction with opposing columns on the proposal outlined in House Bill 512.”

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

stwebsite_1

2018 AEP Annual Convening: Call for Session Proposals 

The Arts Education Partnership (AEP) invites partner organizations and leaders in the field to share their exemplary work supporting the role and contribution of the arts to prepare all students for success in school, work and life. Click here to learn more about this opportunity and to submit a proposal. AEP will accept concurrent session proposals until 5 p.m. PST Friday, June 1. 

  

 

NATIONAL NEWS 

NJartsedArts Education Data takes Center Stage in NJ

The New Jersey Arts Education Census Project has released its Summary Report detailing students’ access to art education around the state. Among the key findings of the report was that nearly all students (99.4 percent) in the state have access to arts instruction. Yet, only 11 percent of students have access to all four arts disciplines required by state code.   The full Census Summary Report is available online. The Census Project is a collaborative partnership with the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, the New Jersey Department of Education, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Arts Ed NJ, ArtPride New Jersey Foundation, and Quadrant Research.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Module One: Program Development – Teaching Artist Preparedness

Print
Presented by the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning in partnership with:
This program is now sold out, but you can click through on the registration link to sign up on the waitlist.
This two-day module is intended for working professional artists in all disciplines who are new to working as a teaching artist, and current teaching artists who would like to enhance or improve their knowledge and skills. This unique opportunity is recommended for artists with interest in working with the presenting partners as a roster teaching artist.
Participants who successfully complete Module One and the corresponding assessment piece will be awarded a digital badge representing their knowledge and competency in arts-integrated program development.
A digital badge provides evidence of achievement as a result of participation and specific accomplishments completed during and after each module. Digital badges may be included in an online portfolio and/or other micro-credentialing sites, such as Mozilla Backpack.
Areas of emphasis include:
  • Arts Integration
  • Youth Development
  • Behavior Management
  • Curricular Connections
  • Outcomes & Indicators
  • Strategies & Activities
Dates: April 19-20, 2018 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. both days
Location: McConnell Arts Center, 777 Evening St. Worthington, OH 43085
Cost: $50
To register visit: tapd-module1.eventbrite.com
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, April 6, 2018
Session Presenters:
David Schiopota
Director of Programs
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Emma Parker
Artistic Manager
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Ryan Upp
Resident Teaching Artist of Photography/Visual Arts
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Kara Stewart
Executive & Artistic Director
ArtSparks
QUESTIONS? Call 216.561.5005 x23 or email emma@arts-inspiredlearning.org
Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update April 2, 2018

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Nominations Open for 2019 Teacher of Year!

The State Board of Education is accepting nominations through Friday, April 13 for the 2019 Ohio Teacher of the Year awards. The Ohio Teacher of the Year award program identifies exceptional teachers statewide and celebrates their effective work in and outside the classroom. Awardees are part of a network of exemplary teachers who are engaged in school improvement initiatives. The board recognizes regional teachers of the year in each of the 11 board districts, and one Ohio Teacher of the Year.

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

New Options Available for Ohio’s High School Equivalence Test

Ohioans now have three testing options for earning a certificate of high school equivalence. The Ohio Department of Education approved GED, HiSET and TASC as the official testing companies for adult learners to use to earn the certificate of high school equivalence, generally considered to be the equivalent of a high school diploma.

“For individuals who haven’t earned a high school diploma, earning the certificate of high school equivalence can be a life-changing event,” Paolo DeMaria, state superintendent of public instruction, said in a release. “A high school diploma or its equivalent often is a minimum requirement for applying for many jobs or for being promoted. It also is needed to enroll in most colleges and advanced training programs. We are proud to provide more testing choices for individuals seeking better futures.”

 

ODE Seeks Public Comment on Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education

The Ohio Department of Education and State Board of Education has released a working draft of the state’s five-year strategic plan for education for public comment. The plan is a tool to inform policy development at the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools. More than 150 preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, and philanthropic organizations worked collaboratively over the last six months to develop the plan.

There are two specific ways you can share your thoughts and inform the continued development of this plan:

  1. Review the full working draft or the highlights summary and respond to the companion survey between March 12 – April 13, 2018.
  1. Attend one of the regional community conversations to discuss the plan directly with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Ohio Department of Education staff.

Register now to attend a local meeting near you.

 

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Governor Kasich signed the following bills into law last week:

HB529 (Ryan) The state’s $2.6 billion capital budget.

SB226 (Bacon) Provides for a permanent three-day holiday during each August.

SB22 (Peterson) Allows tax deductible contributions to Ohio 529 plans for K-12 education expenses, and declares an emergency.

HB98 (Duffey, Boggs) Amends existing law regarding the presentation of career information to students, among other things.
 

RECENTLY INTRODUCED LEGISLATION

SB287 HEALTH EDUCATION (Sykes) Requires the State Board of Education to develop and adopt health education standards before July 1, 2019, establishing that they do so using the same methods they use for any other subject matter.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

The Ohio House and Senate are on spring break through April 6, 2018.

 

 OHIO NEWS

Columbus Dispatch: Vote now: Should Ohio’s education system be changed to give the governor more authority over schools?  

Yes: Let governors lead on education

“This November, voters across Ohio will head to the polls to elect our next governor. As the state’s chief executive, he or she will be expected to lead initiatives that aim to improve the livelihoods of Ohioans and secure the prosperity of the Buckeye State.” 

No: HB 512 would diminish public input in education

“Ohio lawmakers have introduced a proposal — House Bill 512 — that supporters claim solves Ohio’s education workforce readiness challenges. They say it would tackle complex issues like Ohio’s college remediation rates and would better prepare students for the jobs of tomorrow. Yet, nowhere in the 2,430 pages of the bill’s “fixes” are there any solutions to these problems.”

 

Cincinnati Enquirer: Ohioans want a later school start date

“Ohioans have spoken, and they want a later school start date, according to a new poll. The Ohio Travel Association released. The Ohio Travel Association released data from a survey that was done in response to Senator Gayle Manning’s introduction of Senate Bill 34, which would make starting school after Labor Day the default.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Majority of Ohio voters support starting the school year later, according to travel association survey

“A majority of Ohio voters, including both parents and teachers, support starting the school year later in the summer — in contrast to a statewide trend that has more districts opening earlier, as early as the first week of August.  A survey commissioned by the Ohio Travel Association found that 71 percent of voters said schools shouldn’t start before the end of August. Among the reasons why: High temperatures in August that make learning difficult.”

 

Canton Repository: Teen artists display a winning creative spirit

“It’s impressive and encouraging to wander through multiple galleries of the Canton Museum of Art and see walls hung with vibrant, imaginative artwork created by area high school students.

The 27th annual Stark County High School Art Exhibit, on view through April 8, offers young artists the opportunity to have their work displayed in a museum setting. The more than 100 pieces included were selected by the students’ art teachers for both originality and technique. The show contains a variety of styles, themes and media, including watercolor and acrylic paintings, drawings, mixed media, collages and photographs.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: On second thought, Ohio is No. 32 for funding poor and minority students

“Ohio’s not doing such a great job after all, it seems, in directing extra school funding to districts with more poor and minority students. A recent national report that said Ohio was second-best in the nation on this measure probably is mistaken, and that fact is one more illustration of how convoluted the state’s school-funding system is.”

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Module One: Program Development – Teaching Artist Preparedness

Print
Presented by the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning in partnership with:
This program is now sold out, but you can click through on the registration link to sign up on the waitlist.
This two-day module is intended for working professional artists in all disciplines who are new to working as a teaching artist, and current teaching artists who would like to enhance or improve their knowledge and skills. This unique opportunity is recommended for artists with interest in working with the presenting partners as a roster teaching artist.
Participants who successfully complete Module One and the corresponding assessment piece will be awarded a digital badge representing their knowledge and competency in arts-integrated program development.
A digital badge provides evidence of achievement as a result of participation and specific accomplishments completed during and after each module. Digital badges may be included in an online portfolio and/or other micro-credentialing sites, such as Mozilla Backpack.
Areas of emphasis include:
  • Arts Integration
  • Youth Development
  • Behavior Management
  • Curricular Connections
  • Outcomes & Indicators
  • Strategies & Activities
Dates: April 19-20, 2018 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. both days
Location: McConnell Arts Center, 777 Evening St. Worthington, OH 43085
Cost: $50
To register visit: tapd-module1.eventbrite.com
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, April 6, 2018
Session Presenters:
David Schiopota
Director of Programs
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Emma Parker
Artistic Manager
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Ryan Upp
Resident Teaching Artist of Photography/Visual Arts
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Kara Stewart
Executive & Artistic Director
ArtSparks
QUESTIONS? Call 216.561.5005 x23 or email emma@arts-inspiredlearning.org
Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update March 26, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Government Accountability and Oversight Committee

Last week the committee heard testimony on the following bill:

Proponent testimony on HB512 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT (Reineke) To establish the Department of Learning and Achievement.

HB512, the controversial measure that would consolidate the state’s educational agencies into one Department of Learning and Achievement, heard proponent testimony from a few witnesses last week. However, a substitute bill slated for last week’s hearing was not presented and bill sponsor Rep. Bill Reineke (R-Tiffin) said he was still working with different groups to ease some concerns and work out the details. The substitute bill is expected sometime after the House returns from its spring break.

Witnesses from both the Ohio Home Builders Association and Ohio Restaurant Association Education Foundation testified on the importance of increasing the trained skilled trade workers in Ohio to meet the demand in the state.

Patty Halper, executive director of the of the Ohio Restaurant Association Education Foundation praised the creation of the DLA and the potential for more efficient communication throughout the educational continuum. “The career path for these students’ needs to be easier to navigate and the roadblocks that currently exist be removed. I have dealt firsthand with the silos that currently exist with all three current department’s operations and so have our students,” said Ms. Halper. “The removal of the silos to foster a more collaborative and cooperative working environment is what is owed to the students and employers in Ohio if we are to continue to stay pace with rest of the country.”

HB512 would significantly alter education policy and governance by creating a new cabinet level agency reporting directly to the Governor. This would be done by combining the functions of the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE), and the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation to create the Ohio Department of Learning and Achievement (DLA). Also, as part of the new bill, the State Board of Education, which is required under the Ohio constitution, would find its responsibilities and authority significantly reduced, as would the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Critics of the bill say that HB512 would reduce accountability of the state’s education system and could lead to unchecked administrative power. Opponents believe the bill is contrary to the intent of the Ohio’s constitutional provision establishing a state education agency (Board, Superintendent and Department) independent of the Governor’s office. They have voiced concern that the proposed new agency may turn into a ‘mega-agency’ that would bottleneck communication, prove more difficult for people to navigate, and dramatically reduce transparency and the ability for the public and professional educators to track and affect education policy development.  And opponents point out that HB512 would result in significant barriers to parent and public input in a state that is meant to offer local control of schools.

 

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

Last week the committee heard testimony on the following bills:

Sponsor testimony on HB540 TEACHER EVALUATIONS (Gavarone, Manning)  With regard to teacher evaluations.

Sponsors Rep. Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green) and Rep. Nathan Manning (R-N. Ridgeville) told the committee that the new teacher evaluation measure was created from recommendations provided by the Educator Standards Board after reviewing the current Ohio Teacher Evaluation System. “These proposed reforms seek to restructure OTES so that evaluations are teacher-driven and student-focused. Student learning is supported by the development of quality educators,” said co-sponsors Rep. Gavarone said. “HB540 recognizes that evaluations should provide teachers with relevant feedback that helps them continuously improve their practice in the classroom. In this way, high-quality teacher evaluations benefit both teachers and students.”

The proposal would include the following changes:

  1. Update OTES Rubric to embed student growth indicators, clarify descriptors to decrease redundancy, and improve clarity in the distinctions between performance levels.
  1. Student growth data will be linked with improving instruction, as opposed to an isolated evaluation factor linked to an arbitrary percentage.
  1. Shared attribution would be removed as it does not accurately measure teacher performance or student growth because of the use of assessments for a group of students that the educator does not teach.
  1. Alternative framework components like student portfolios, student surveys, peer review, self-evaluation, and district-determined measures, will remain as optional sources of evidence of teacher effectiveness.
  1. For teachers on a full evaluation cycle, the two required formal observations and optional number of walkthroughs will be maintained, along with a required end of annual cycle conference with the evaluator.
  1. The off-year evaluation schedule for teachers rated skilled or accomplished will be maintained but adds the requirement of a conference in off-years for skilled and accomplished teachers to discuss professional growth and progress toward goals. There would also be a requirement for teachers who are rated as skilled to submit professional growth plans developed with their evaluations in off years.

 

Reported out of committee & amendment accepted on HB491 EDUCATION LICENSE (Edwards) To require the State Board of Education to issue a substitute license to specified pupil services personnel.

Prior to reporting the legislation, the committee accepted an amendment that Rep. Brenner said requires substitute nurses to hold a bachelor degrees. Under this bill, eight types of licensed professionals would be eligible for a substitute license including school nurses, social workers and speech and language pathologists. Currently, these professionals must obtain a Pupil Services License in addition to their occupational license.

 

Proponent testimony on HB377 SEXUAL ABUSE (Hagan, Ramos) With respect to age-appropriate student instruction in child sexual abuse and sexual violence prevention and in-service staff training in child sexual abuse prevention.

The woman who inspired sponsors to write HB377 testified via webcam about her story. As a victim of abuse as a child, Ms. Merryn said student instruction is important to teach children not to wait to speak up because they either don’t know who to turn to or feel they won’t be supported. “Some may feel this is a lesson that should be left in the home, but the sad reality is most parents don’t go beyond talking about strangers with their kids,” she said. Ms. Merryn said that because abusers are often someone the family knows it is important students are taught about unsafe touches and secrets.

 

Proponent testimony on HB502 & HB503 YOUTH SUICIDE (Anielski) With regard to educator in-service training on youth suicide awareness and prevention in public schools (HB502) and private schools (HB503).

Both HB502 and HB503 received proponent testimony on the value of ensuring that teachers and administrators are familiar with the outward signs of teenage depression.  Sandy Williams, chair of the board of directors for the Ohio Suicide Prevention Foundation, testified on the prevalence of the matter in Ohio. “Unfortunately, we have all seen the tragic consequences of unrecognized, undiagnosed and untreated mental health problems in our youth,” she said. “Specifically, in Ohio suicide is the second leading cause of death for those aged 10-24.”

 

House Finance Committee (Chair: Cupp)

The committee heard testimony on the following education bill last week:

Proponent testimony HB318 SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS (Patterson, LaTourette) To define the necessary qualifications and responsibilities of school resource officers.

After clearing the Career and Readiness Committee last month, HB318 expanded to include a one-time grant for school safety and was referred to the Finance Committee for consideration. The grant would fund one-time expenditures to improve safety in Ohio’s schools and could be used for training, safety devices for classroom doors, training equipment, safety equipment at schools and all grade level educational resources.

 

Senate Finance Committee (Chair: Oelslager)

The committee heard testimony on the following education bill last week: 

Proponent and Interested testimony on SB246 STUDENT REMOVAL (Lehner, Manning) To enact the “SAFE Act” to revise the procedures for emergency removal of a student, to prohibit certain suspensions and expulsions of students in grades pre- kindergarten through three, to require each public school to implement a positive behavior intervention and supports framework in accordance with state standards, and to make an appropriation.

More supporters testified last week during the third hearing for SB246. In addition to child advocates, Darold Johnson, legislative director for the Ohio Federation of Teachers, also testified in support of the plan. “By focusing on improving social emotional learning and training teachers and students how to deal with a traumatic situation in a positive way in the early grades the hope is we will lay the foundation of learning and behavior so there are fewer reasons to suspend students in later grades,” he said.

 

Passed by the Senate

SB216 SCHOOL REGULATIONS (Huffman)

SB216, also known as the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act, was passed by the Senate and now moves to the House for deliberations. See a summary of the Senate-passed version of the bill here.

 

Education-related bills sent to the governor’s desk for signature include:

HB529 CAPITAL APPROPRIATIONS (Ryan) the capital appropriations bill 

HB98 CAREER INFORMATION (Duffey, Boggs) which prohibits school district boards of education from imposing restrictions on the presentation of career information to students by representatives of skilled trades or providers of career-technical education that are not uniformly imposed on representatives of business, industry, charitable institutions, institutions of higher education, armed forces, and other employers.

SB226 TAX HOLIDAY (Bacon) which makes the August three-day sales tax holiday permanent and authorizes a county school financing district property tax to be used for school safety, security, and mental health services.

Columbus Dispatch: Lawmakers Pass Sales Tax/School Safety Combo

“The sales tax holiday that Ohioans have been utilizing in August for the past three years will continue indefinitely, if Gov. John Kasich signs a bill making the three-day tax break permanent.”

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

The Ohio House and Senate are on spring break through April 6, 2018.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE Seeks Public Comment on Ohio’s Strategic Plan for Education

The Ohio Department of Education and State Board of Education have released a draft of their proposed strategic plan for education and will be holding several public meetings around the state to gather feedback.

The purpose of the plan is to help each child become successful thanks to the guidance and support of caring adults who are empowered by an effective system. The plan is a tool to inform policy development at the Ohio Statehouse and education practice in Ohio’s schools. More than 150 preK-12 educators, higher education representatives, parents and caregivers, employers, business leaders, philanthropic organizations worked collaboratively over the last six months to develop it.

There are two specific ways you can share your thoughts and inform the continued development of this plan:

  1. Review the full working draft or the highlights summary and respond to the companion survey between March 12 – April 13, 2018.
  1. Attend one of 13 regional community conversations to discuss your thoughts on the plan directly with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Ohio Department of Education staff.

Register now to attend a local meeting near you.

Lucas County: March 26, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Cuyahoga County: March 27, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Montgomery County: March 29, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Ashtabula County: April 3, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Franklin County: April 5, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

Hamilton County: April 17, 2018 – 6-8 p.m.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Module One: Program Development – Teaching Artist Preparedness

Print
Presented by the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning in partnership with:
This program is now sold out, but you can click through on the registration link to sign up on the waitlist.
This two-day module is intended for working professional artists in all disciplines who are new to working as a teaching artist, and current teaching artists who would like to enhance or improve their knowledge and skills. This unique opportunity is recommended for artists with interest in working with the presenting partners as a roster teaching artist.
Participants who successfully complete Module One and the corresponding assessment piece will be awarded a digital badge representing their knowledge and competency in arts-integrated program development.
A digital badge provides evidence of achievement as a result of participation and specific accomplishments completed during and after each module. Digital badges may be included in an online portfolio and/or other micro-credentialing sites, such as Mozilla Backpack.
Areas of emphasis include:
  • Arts Integration
  • Youth Development
  • Behavior Management
  • Curricular Connections
  • Outcomes & Indicators
  • Strategies & Activities
Dates: April 19-20, 2018 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. both days
Location: McConnell Arts Center, 777 Evening St. Worthington, OH 43085
Cost: $50
To register visit: tapd-module1.eventbrite.com
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, April 6, 2018
Session Presenters:
David Schiopota
Director of Programs
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Emma Parker
Artistic Manager
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Ryan Upp
Resident Teaching Artist of Photography/Visual Arts
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Kara Stewart
Executive & Artistic Director
ArtSparks
QUESTIONS? Call 216.561.5005 x23 or email emma@arts-inspiredlearning.org
Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts on Line Education Update March 19, 2018

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

March 12 & 13 Meeting Recap 

Board Votes to Formally Oppose HB512

State Board members voted 11-4 for an emergency resolution objecting to HB512.  The majority of the board felt this formal stand against legislation that would weaken the Board along with consolidate higher education, education and workforce agencies to create the Department of Learning and Achievement was necessary.  Many Board members have also formally testified in opposition to HB512 during recent committee hearings. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State school board opposes bill that would slash its power

“The state school board voted 11-4 Tuesday to oppose a plan to wipe out 80 percent of its power in a merger of the state departments of education, higher education and workforce transformation. The vote comes as the Ohio House considers House Bill 512, which calls for the merger in the name of better preparing students for the workforce.

Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee: Chronic Absenteeism on Ohio School Report Cards

The Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee discussed the addition of Chronic Absenteeism to the Indicators Met measure within the Academic Achievement Component on Ohio School Report Cards.  Chronic Absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the school year for any reason, which is approximately 18 days of school.  Currently Ohio’s rate is 16.9 percent.  Districts and schools will meet the indicator if they meet the established threshold or show improvement from the previous year in one of three different pathways.

Pathway 1:

School Year Goal for students meeting persistent attendance expectations

 

School Year Goal for students meeting persistent attendance expectations

 

2017-2018 86.4%
2018-2019 87.4%
2019-2020 88.5%
2020-2021 89.6%
2021-2022 90.7%
2022-2023 91.8%
2023-2024 92.8%
2024-2025 93.9%
2025-2026 95%

 

Patchway 2:

Districts and schools will meet the indicator if they improve the number of students meeting attendance expectations by at least 1.1 percentage points from one year to the next – regardless of its prior year rate.

 

Pathway 3:

Districts and schools reduce their percent of chronically absent students by 3 percent. A formal resolution detailing the new indicator is expected to receive a committee vote in April. It would then come before the full board in May.

 

Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction: School Safety

Superintendent Paolo DeMaria discussed a ‘holistic’ approach to school safety and security that focused on four different elements: prevention, buildings / facilities, emergency management plans and practicing the emergency management plans. Paola stressed the importance of positive school climate and its role in prevention as well as discussed services available for students in mental health crisis. He also stressed construction and retro-fitting of secure doors and emergency radios through the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission. However, DeMaria reminded the Board that it is imperative that schools’ required safety plans are embraced by all staff and practiced regularly through drills.

 

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Government Accountability and Oversight Committee 

The committee heard testimony on the following education bill last week:

Proponent and Opponent testimony on HB512 (Reineke) Restructure education agencies and their duties

The committee heard another wave of oppositional testimony last week against HB512 with only the Ohio Chamber of Commerce testifying in favor of the bill as an interested party.  Opponents included State Board members Meryl Johnson and Lisa Woods, as well as many homeschool parents and education advocates.

Board member Woods said the legislation moves too quickly into a solution without an extensive discussion from all stakeholders.  She also voiced concern that HB512 would create unchecked administrative power.  “Letting one man or woman be in charge takes away the critical checks and balances,” Woods said.  “The purpose of schools is to give our children a well-rounded education, to give them skills that will transcend any occupation. Education is not job training for jobs that are needed in Ohio now. That is short-sighted. Do not confuse education with workforce development. They are two very different disciplines.”

However, Ohio Chamber of Commerce Vice President of Government Affairs Keith Lake told the House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee that education and workforce development go hand in hand.  “Better alignment of our education system to better prepare our workforce for both today and for the future is essential,” Lake said.  “The bill would establish a clear pathway for the alignment between individuals and employers. This should result in Ohio’s education and talent development systems being more effective, agile and accountable.”

HB512 would significantly alter education policy and governance by creating a new cabinet level agency. This would be done by combining the functions of the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE), and the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation to create the Ohio Department of Learning and Achievement. Also, as part of the new bill, the State Board of Education, which is required under the Ohio constitution, would find its responsibilities and authority significantly reduced, as would the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Columbus Dispatch: Amid opposition, Chamber backs education merger bill

“The Ohio Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday jumped in to support a controversial bill giving the governor control over much of the Ohio Department of Education. Amid another lineup of largely home-school parents concerned about the consequences of turning over education rule-making and oversight to a governor’s appointee, a chamber leader testified it would make Ohio’s talent development more effective and accountable.” 

Cincinnati Enquirer: Q&A: Ohio’s proposed merger of education, training agencies

“Ohio Gov. John Kasich has long pushed to take over Ohio’s education department, whose structure he sees as a hindrance to unified school policy.  A bill moving swiftly through the state Legislature includes that takeover and more. The legislation would merge three state entities and place the new combined agency under the governor’s watch.”

 

Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Sponsor testimony on HB517 (Schaffer, Leland) To designate the month of October as “Ohio Principals Month.”

Bill sponsor Rep. Tim Schaffer indicated that there are more than 3,000 principals in the state of Ohio.  “All are crucial leaders in ensuring that every child has access to a high-quality education,” Schaffer said. “This legislation will recognize the essential role all elementary, middle, and high school principals play in the development of our youth.”

 

Opponent testimony on HB491 (Edwards)  To require the State Board of Education to issue a substitute license to specified pupil services personnel.

Under this bill, eight types of licensed professionals would be eligible for a substitute license including school nurses, social workers and speech and language pathologists.  Currently, these professionals must obtain a Pupil Services License in addition to their occupational license.  

The Ohio Association of School Nurses president Joan Hlinomaz voiced concern on the bill’s lack of educational requirements for substitute nurses. “The Ohio Association of School Nurses requests the bachelor’s degree be required to be consistent with the minimum all other disciplines for this substitute license to pupil service personnel, as well to the position being provided a substitute,” Ms. Hlinomaz said.

 

Opponent testimony on HB442 (Antani) To authorize any student from a country or province outside the United States who attends an elementary or secondary school in Ohio and holds an F-1 visa to participate in interscholastic athletics at that school on the same basis as Ohio residents.

The Ohio High School Athletic Association testified against the bill citing inequity for Ohio student athletes and the potential for the recruitment of foreign students on an F-1 visa.

 

Amended and Reported Out of Committee – HB360 (Greenspan) To enact the “Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act” with regard to school discipline and bullying and hazing policies at public schools and public colleges.

HB360 was amended to exclude private schools and then reported out by a 10 to 7 vote with Rep. Hood the only Republican to vote against the bill.  The measure would create a ‘due process’ for exploring and responding to bullying claims.   It also expands the definition of who may be a victim of bullying to include administrators, employees, faculty members, teachers, consultants and volunteers.

 

Senate Finance Committee 

The committee heard testimony on the following education bill last week: 

Proponent and Interested testimony on SB246  (Lehner, Manning) To enact the “SAFE Act” to revise the procedures for emergency removal of a student, to prohibit certain suspensions and expulsions of students in grades pre- kindergarten through three, to require each public school to implement a positive behavior intervention and supports framework in accordance with state standards, and to make an appropriation.

Proponents of the bill testified in favor of the increased training and awareness of students who have experienced trauma, many of whom act out in school.   “I have personally witnessed many children who have experienced trauma that affects their abilities to function in a classroom setting,” said Vanessa Shrontz, master teacher at the A. Sophie Rogers School for Early Learning at Ohio State University.  “I have Masters’ degrees in both Applied Developmental Psychology and in Social Work. Even with almost a decade of experience working with children and families in traumatic situations, the need for additional training and collaboration with other experts, is needed and would be welcomed in my teaching practice.”

 

Senate Education Committee 

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Proponent testimony on SB241 To establish a category of nonpublic schools called “accredited nonpublic schools” and to prescribe requirements and exemptions for such schools. 

The committee held its second hearing on SB241 and Dan Dodd, executive director of the Ohio Association of Independent Schools testified in favor of the bill.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, March 20

1:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

  • HB477 (Koehler) To eliminate various provisions and programs related to the Department of Education and the operation of primary and secondary schools. 4th Hearing-All testimony-Possible vote
  • HB491  (Edwards) To require the State Board of Education to issue a substitute license to specified pupil services personnel. 4th Hearing-All testimony-Possible vote
  • HB377 (Hagan, Ramos) With respect to age-appropriate student instruction in child sexual abuse and sexual violence prevention and in-service staff training in child sexual abuse prevention. 4th Hearing-All testimony-Possible vote
  • HB540 (Gavarone, Manning) With regard to teacher evaluations. 1st Hearing-Sponsor
  • HB502 & HB503 (Anielski) With regard to educator in-service training on youth suicide awareness and prevention in public schools. 2nd Hearing-Proponent

 

2:30 p.m. Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

  • SB246 (Lehner, Manning) To enact the “SAFE Act” to revise the procedures for emergency removal of a student, to prohibit certain suspensions and expulsions of students in grades pre- kindergarten through three, to require each public school to implement a positive behavior intervention and supports framework in accordance with state standards, and to make an appropriation. 3rd Hearing-All testimony

 

 

Wednesday, March 21

9:30 a.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 114

Government Accountability and Oversight Committee Chair: Blessing

  • HB512 (Reineke) Restructure education agencies and their duties 5th Hearing, Possible Substitution 

 

1:30 p.m. Ohio Statehouse
Senate Session

1:30 p.m. Ohio Statehouse
House Session

 

 

MARCHING WITH THE ARTS

OAAE Advocacy Poster

Grab our Advocacy Poster to use in your classroom! (Download at bit.ly/2G2kuFz)

State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE) reminds art educators to celebrate the arts during the month of March!

March highlights four arts areas in our schools through Dance in Our SchoolsMusic in Our SchoolsTheatre in Our Schools, and Youth Art Month. Each unique content area encourages month-long events aimed to highlight the significance of each arts area in our schools and communities.

The visual and performing arts help to educate all of our students both through the building of students’ social and emotional skills, as well as academic skills and techniques of the artforms. We celebrate the arts and honor the efforts of those who continue to inspire, create, perform, and enhance our lives through the arts.

Everyone is encouraged to participate in the annual celebrations. How are you celebrating the arts in your school community? Participate in the poll!

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Associated Press: Hundreds of Ohio students rally at Statehouse on gun policy

“A high school student whose cousin was killed in the Parkland school shooting was among hundreds of Ohio students to descend on the Statehouse during a national day of activism around gun policy.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: From Kasich to Kucinich, politicians praise student walkouts

“From John Kasich to Dennis Kucinich, Ohio officials are praising student walkouts that mark one month since the Florida school shooting that took 17 lives.  On CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street,” Kasich said, “I am very, very pleased that young people continue to speak out so politicians can’t go and hide because that’s what they tend to do. It makes me feel so good we are beginning to see, increasingly, an age of activism.”

 

Toledo Blade: Area students participate in National School Walkout

“During a silent protest at Whitmer High School, 17-year-old Caitlin Collins let a yellow sign held overhead speak for her.  “Sorry For The Inconvenience, We’re Trying To Change The World,” the sign read.”

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Module One: Program Development – Teaching Artist Preparedness

Print
Presented by the Center for Arts-Inspired Learning in partnership with:
This program is now sold out, but you can click through on the registration link to sign up on the waitlist.
This two-day module is intended for working professional artists in all disciplines who are new to working as a teaching artist, and current teaching artists who would like to enhance or improve their knowledge and skills. This unique opportunity is recommended for artists with interest in working with the presenting partners as a roster teaching artist.
Participants who successfully complete Module One and the corresponding assessment piece will be awarded a digital badge representing their knowledge and competency in arts-integrated program development.
A digital badge provides evidence of achievement as a result of participation and specific accomplishments completed during and after each module. Digital badges may be included in an online portfolio and/or other micro-credentialing sites, such as Mozilla Backpack.
Areas of emphasis include:
  • Arts Integration
  • Youth Development
  • Behavior Management
  • Curricular Connections
  • Outcomes & Indicators
  • Strategies & Activities
Dates: April 19-20, 2018 from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. both days
Location: McConnell Arts Center, 777 Evening St. Worthington, OH 43085
Cost: $50
To register visit: tapd-module1.eventbrite.com
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Friday, April 6, 2018
Session Presenters:
David Schiopota
Director of Programs
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Emma Parker
Artistic Manager
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Ryan Upp
Resident Teaching Artist of Photography/Visual Arts
Center for Arts-Inspired Learning
Kara Stewart
Executive & Artistic Director
ArtSparks
QUESTIONS? Call 216.561.5005 x23 or email emma@arts-inspiredlearning.org
Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education AssociationOhio Art Education AssociationOhio Educational Theatre Association  OhioDance , and the Ohio Arts Council.

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment