Arts On Line Education Update November 20, 2017

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
November 13 & 14 

The Achievement & Graduation Requirements Committee

The committee met and discussed graduation prospects and requirements for the classes of 2018 and 2019. As part of the discussion, Ohio Department of Education (ODE) staff released a concept paper highlighting three potential graduation requirement options for the class of 2019. The options included were:

Option A: Stick with the original three options as originally configured (earn at least 18 out of 35 points on end-of-course tests; earn industry-recognized credentials and pass the WorkKeys test; or earn remediation-free scores in math and English on the ACT or SAT)

Option B: Create an additional permanent option that is a Demonstration Based Pathway

Option C: Infuse additional demonstrations of learning as substitutes in the State Standardized Assessment Based Pathway

The additional graduation pathways for the class of 2018, passed as part of House Bill 49, do not currently apply to future classes.  Currently the class of 2018 has substantially more students that have met or are highly likely to meet requirements for graduation compared to last year at this time.  A small percentage of students, 5.5 percent, met graduation requirements exclusively by scoring remediation-free on the ACT or SAT.

  • Last year students likely to meet requirements at this time: 28.2 percent
  • This year students likely to meet requirements at this time: 57.8 percent 

While the percentage of students to meet the End-of-Course pathway is similar to the trends seen last year for the Class of 2018, substantially more students in the Class of 2019 have already met requirements. 

Columbus Dispatch: Should Ohio keep softer high school graduation requirements?

“Faced with a host of students who might not get their diplomas, the Ohio’s state school board backed off tougher graduation requirements for this year’s high school seniors.  But what happens now?  That was the question of the day during Monday’s board gathering.” 

Dayton Daily News: What could more graduation rule changes mean for the Class of 2019?

“The state school board on Monday began discussion of long-term changes to Ohio’s high school graduation requirements, possibly extending Class of 2018 options like senior projects, strong attendance and minimum GPAs to the class of 2019 and beyond.” 

 

The Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee

The committee started discussions Monday on an element of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan that would establish a new report card indicator for students who retake high school exams. Under the ESSA plan, Ohio proposes that only first-time test takers’ scores would be included in the indicators for Ohio’s seven end-of-course exams. A new indicator would be created to measure how many students initially scoring one or two points on any of the exams improved their scores on a retake.

Chris Woolard, head of accountability for ODE, told the board’s Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee that creating the indicator would require the board to pass a resolution.  He also indicated he planned to present data at a future meeting that would show the effects of different thresholds for determining whether a district met the indicator.

The Educators and Student Options Committee

Educators who teach middle grades social studies may have a new Ohio History section on their licensure test. The Educators and Student Options Committee approved the new section in a 5-1 vote, approving the addition of a fifth content section to the Ohio Assessments for Educators middle grades social studies test and setting a minimum passing score for the test. If approved by the full board, the “Ohio” portion in the United States section will constitute 10 percent of the assessment’s score.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Proponent and opponent testimony on HB200 (Koehler) To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

In its seventh hearing, the bill that has a Senate companion (SB85 ) continued to draw both criticism and support.

Frank​ ​O’Linn, ​Associate​ ​Superintendent​ ​of​ ​Secondary​ ​Schools​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Catholic Diocese​ ​of​ ​Cleveland, spoke in favor of the bill.  “At​ ​its​ ​most basic,​ ​this​ ​bill​ ​is​ ​about​ ​giving​ ​options​ ​to​ ​those​ ​who​ ​do​ ​not​ ​have​ ​the​ ​financial​ ​means​ ​to​ ​choose​ ​something other​ ​than​ ​their​ ​current​ ​public​ ​option,” O’Linn told the House panel.  “By​ ​focusing​ ​on​ ​income​ ​levels,​ ​this​ ​bill​ ​provides​ ​choice​ ​to​ ​those​ ​who​ ​cannot​ ​afford resettling​ ​or​ ​tuition,​ ​giving​ ​families​ ​lowest​ ​in​ ​socio-economic​ ​status​ ​support​ ​to​ ​select​ ​a​ ​high​ ​quality school​ ​that​ ​​ ​is​ ​the​ ​best​ ​fit​ ​for​ ​their​ ​child.​”

Traditional school leaders, meanwhile, have raised concerns that state money used for vouchers and charter schools would be better used by districts.  One of several witnesses speaking in opposition of HB200 was Terry Groden, Vice President of the North Olmsted City Schools Board of Education.  “Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the proposed legislation is the notion that more money might be available for voucher expansion when so many public school districts have been asked to do more with less over the past several years,” Groden testified.  “We encourage the General Assembly to reinvest in traditional public education in Ohio, and not expand vouchers beyond the current level, should more funds become available.” 

Proponent and opponent testimony on HB21 (Hambley) Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

The committee accepted a substitute bill from Rep. Steve Hambley (R-Brunswick) that, among other things, would require charter school governing authorities to set enrollment and attendance policies.

The substitute bill:

  • Specifies that the verification to the Ohio Department of Education must take place upon the enrollment of each student and then on an annual basis.
  • Permits each student’s resident district to review the determination made by the community school.
  • Permits the district, if it disagrees as to which district a student is entitled to attend, to present the matter to the state superintendent of public instruction.
  • Requires the state superintendent to determine which district the student is entitled to attend not later than 30 days after the district presents the matter to the superintendent and to direct any necessary adjustments to payments and deductions under the school-funding formula based on that determination.

The latest version of the bill also removes SSID language that conflicts with the biennial budget (HB49) and requires school districts, as opposed to charter schools, to make a good faith effort to determine the students’ correct residences, Rep. Hambley said.

Sponsor testimony on HB377  (Hagan, Ramos) With respect to age-appropriate student instruction in child sexual abuse and sexual violence prevention and in-service staff training in child sexual abuse prevention.

Sponsor Rep. Dan Ramos (D-Lorain) testified that every six minutes, a child is sexually assaulted in the United States and as many as one in four girls, and one in six boys, are sexually assaulted before age 18, said.  HB337 would establish sexual abuse education in schools in an effort to prevent abuse, and would also require schools to establish a means by which abuse can be reported and abused children can receive emotional support and interventions.

“As a state, and as a nation, we have failed to establish an environment that protects our children’s innocence,” he said in sponsor testimony. “Furthermore, we have failed to establish a safe forum to help children that have been abused identify those actions as abuse and get help in obtaining intervention, recovering and protecting themselves in the future.”

The Conference Committee on SB8

The Conference Committee on SB8 (Gardner, Terhar) and the full Senate Wednesday unanimously approved the report on the bill containing an omnibus  amendment that makes a number of budget corrective changes impacting school districts.

Several amendments described as budget corrections were amended into the bill including a nearly $7.4 million increase in state aid for school districts experiencing reductions in Tangible Personal Property Tax (TPP) reimbursements.  The bill would increase the payments made to certain school districts for their fixed-rate operating TPP tax losses in fiscal years (FY) 2018 and 2019.   Sen. Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green) said the funding increase will help school districts “excessively impacted” by the loss of TPP revenue. According to a Legislative Service Commission (LSC) document, the provision would provide additional funding to 19 traditional school districts and three joint vocational school districts (JVSDs).

The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 32-0. The House is expected to take up the bill after Thanksgiving.

 

NEW LEGISLATION

Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering), chair of the Senate Education Committee, said at a Statehouse press conference Tuesday she’ll again seek the suspension-expulsion ban for grades three and below, including preschool.  This ban would not apply to discipline imposed for violent or dangerous behavior and Ohio schools would have four years to stop issuing out-of-school suspensions and expulsions as punishment for children in preschool and early elementary grades under this bipartisan legislation.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: 36,000 suspensions for Ohio third graders and younger could prompt ban on harsh punishments
“Ohio could join the growing number of states and cities to ban suspensions of young students as damaging and counterproductive, under a new bill to be released this week.  State Sen. Peggy Lehner, who chairs the Senate education committee, says she is astounded that Ohio schools kick kids in kindergarten through third grade out of school more than 30,000 times a year.”

Columbus Dispatch: Bill seeks to end suspensions of youngest Ohio students
“Shocked by data showing that Ohio schools suspended approximately 34,000 children from pre-kindergarten through third grade last year, a bipartisan group of legislators wants to largely put an end to the punishment for the state’s youngest students.

‘We would never consider punishing a child because they didn’t know how to count or identify their colors,’ said Sen. Peggy Lehner, R-Kettering. ‘But we need to recognize the lack of social and emotional skills is something we should be correcting, not punishing.'”

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: 2017 Community School Sponsor Evaluations Released

“As part of ongoing efforts to increase accountability and quality in Ohio’s community school system, the Ohio Department of Education today released the 2016-2017 sponsor evaluations. A change to Ohio law in the recently passed state budget requires the evaluations to be released by November 15.  ‘High quality sponsors are the key to successful community schools,’ said Paolo DeMaria, superintendent of public instruction. ‘Their oversight drives effective operations and increased academic achievement. The sponsor evaluations are an important piece of Ohio’s accountability system, helping to ensure Ohio’s families have quality school choice options.'” 

ODE: WorkKeys transition to new version

Ohio high school graduation options include a passing score on the WorkKeys assessment as a criterion students may meet to earn a diploma. ACT WorkKeys assessments “measure foundational skills required for success in the workplace, and help measure the workplace skills that can affect job performance.”

 

Districts and schools can administer the WorkKeys assessment to students. The state will reimburse them for the cost of one test per student. Most Ohio districts and schools can administer the WorkKeys test under the state contract. Last week, ACT sent access information to all sites registered to administer WorkKeys.

 

“ACT released a new version of WorkKeys on June 1 with several significant changes, including different assessment names, items and scoring scales. The original version of WorkKeys will be operational in the Ohio online testing portal through Feb. 1. Ohio will transition to the new version of WorkKeys, and the original WorkKeys will no longer be available after Feb. 1, 2018.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

The 74: Principals Support Social-Emotional Learning, but 83% Don’t Know How to Measure Its Success, Study Finds
“America’s principals understand the importance of social-emotional learning but aren’t certain how they should measure it, how to implement it successfully in a classroom, or how to prepare their educators to teach it.  That’s according to a new survey of K-12 principals from the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning. Amid growing research showing the benefits of social-emotional learning for student well-being, graduation rates, and academics, the survey reveals what educators still need to do to make SEL work within schools.”

Chalkbeat: When Teachers Are Better at Raising Test Scores, Their Students Are Less Happy, Study Finds
“Is a good teacher one who makes students enjoy class the most or one who is strict and has high standards? And are those two types even at odds? A new study that tries to quantify this phenomenon finds that on average, teachers who are good at raising test scores are worse at making kids happy in class  “Teachers who are skilled at improving students’ math achievement may do so in ways that make students less happy or less engaged in class,” writes University of Maryland’s David Blazar in the study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Education Finance and Policy.”

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Sing Me A Story

The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for PK-1 teachers on Wednesday, November 29. Deborah Sunya Moore, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “Sing Me A Story” from 4:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center. Participants will be led through several lesson plans that explore elements of music within the text of a book such as steady beat and musical forms such as echo, call & response, and verse-chorus. Email Debbie Stoler at Tri-County ESC to register. The event flyer is available online.

Location: Tri-County ESC, Wooster
Date: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Summary of SB216 The Ohio Public School Deregulation Act

Written by Joan Platz
October 19, 2017

Senator Matt Huffman (R-Lima) introduced on October 10, 2017 SB216 (Huffman), the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act.  The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Peggy Lehner, is now holding hearings on the bill.

According to Senator Huffman, the bill was developed based on the recommendations from several school superintendents in his 12th Senate District (Lima), and from other superintendents around the state.  A working group from the Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA) also contributed to the bill.

These superintendents identified state mandates in law that added to school district costs, or were inefficient or ineffective. The bill’s intent is to reduce regulations and mandates for local schools to increase local control, improve efficiency, and reduce costs, while still supporting improved student achievement.

One of the bill’s provisions, for example, changes state law to revise Ohio’s Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) based on the recommendations of the Educator Standards Board and the State Board of Education.  The Ohio Education Association is also working on a bill with Senator Peggy Lehner to revise OTES.

But relaxing other mandates, such as the requirement that teachers be certified in the subjects that they are teaching, could lower the quality and effectiveness of classroom instruction, which could lower student achievement.

The bill makes changes in the following areas of law:

  • Ohio Teacher Evaluation System
    • Student academic growth
    • Additional features of OTES
    • Frequency of evaluations
    • Professional growth plans
    • Formal observations of teachers
    • Alternative framework – repealed
  • Educator license grade bands
  • Teacher employment for any subject area or grade level
  • Educational aide permits and educational paraprofessional licenses
    • Individuals required to hold a permit or license
  • Nonteaching employee contracts
  • Educator licenses for substitute teaching
  • Professional development for certain gifted services providers
  • State achievement assessments
    • Paper and online administration of certain state assessments
    • Analysis and assistance
  • Kindergarten readiness diagnostic assessment eliminated
    • Effect on the Third-Grade Reading Guarantee
  • College Credit Plus
    • Comparable course delivery
    • Textbooks
    • Study on results and cost-effectiveness
    • Background on CCP
  • Excessively absent students
    • Background on student attendance
  • Special education preschool staffing
  • Reading improvement plans
  • Reporting of student performance
  • School mandate reports

SUMMARY OF SB216 (HUFFMAN) THE OHIO PUBLIC SCHOOL DEREGULATION ACT

The following is a summary of the bill based on the bill as introduced and an analysis prepared by the Ohio Legislative Service Commission:

Section 3301.02 State Report Card:  The bill eliminates the requirement that districts, in which fewer than five percent of students have scored below grade level on the kindergarten assessment, receive no letter grade on the K–3 literacy component on the report card.

Section 3301.078 Analysis of Assessment Questions:  New Sections (C) and (D) require the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to request that the American Institutes for Research (AIR) provide at the beginning of each school year starting in the 2018-19, an analysis of assessment questions on the state exams developed by AIR, and show how the questions are aligned to Ohio’s state academic content standards.  AIR must also provide schools and districts with practice materials and guides for the assessments.

Section 3301.079 Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA):  Under current law, each school district, community school, and STEM school is required to administer certain diagnostic assessments in reading, writing, and math in kindergarten, first, and second grade, and in reading and writing in third grade. These assessments are used to determine student progress, and identify which students need to receive additional services in order to attain grade level performance under the Third Grade Reading Guarantee.

The Ohio Department of Education has approved eight assessments that can be used by school districts to evaluate literacy progress, but the law requires the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) to be administered to all kindergarten students in the fall.  The results of the KRA are used to evaluate preschool programs under the “Step Up to Quality” program, but not all preschools participate in this program.

Some school districts question the requirement to administer the KRA, because it can’t be administered in the spring to evaluate incoming kindergarten students; takes teachers out of the classroom and away from their students to individually administer the assessment; and doesn’t provide valuable information about students in a timely manner. Most school districts administer other assessments to provide ongoing information about student progress in literacy throughout the school year.

The bill eliminates the KRA diagnostic and the inclusion of kindergartners in the Third Grade Reading Guarantee.

Several other sections of the ORC are amended as a result of the elimination of the KRA.  These include sections 3301.074; 3301.0715; 3301.163; 3301.52; 3302.13; 3310.03; 3313.413; 3313.608; and 3314.35.

Section 3301.0711 Administer and Grading State Assessments:  The bill allows school districts, other public schools, or chartered nonpublic schools to administer any state assessment in a paper format, or a combined online and paper format, in the third, fourth, or fifth grades. This would include state assessments in English and math in grades three, four, and five; assessments in social students in grade four, and assessments in science in grade five.

The bill also defines “other public schools” as community schools; STEM schools; or a college preparatory boarding school.

Section 3301.0714 Education Management Information System (EMIS):  This section includes an amendment regarding data pertaining to the kindergarten readiness assessment, which is eliminated in the bill.

The bill also requires school districts to report the person or persons, if any, at whom the student’s violent behavior was directed starting on July 1, 2018.

Section 3301.0715 Reading Improvement Plan: The bill removes a provision that required a board of education to administer to kindergarten students a readiness assessment, and a provision that allowed a chartered nonpublic school to administer the kindergarten readiness assessment.

The bill also requires any school district, community school, or STEM school in which less than 80 percent of its students score at the proficient level or higher on the third-grade English language arts assessment prescribed under section 3301.0710 ORC to establish a reading improvement plan supported by reading specialists. Prior to implementation, the plan must be approved by the school district’s board of education.

NEW Section 3301.68 School Mandate Report: The bill requires the ODE to establish a school mandate report to consolidate safety requirements and mandates identified in this section. Each district or school must complete and file the report on an annual basis prior to the end of the school year. The district or school must provide its board of education a written explanation for why it is not in compliance with the specified mandates, and submit a written plan of action to comply with the mandate.

Section 3302.03 Report Cards: The bill changes the minimum number of students for any group for reporting purposes from 10 students to 30 students, referred to as the N-Size.  The result is that no performance data for a specific student group will be reported if fewer than 30 students are in that group for a school or school district.

Section 3311.80 Municipal School District:  Requires a municipal school district to continue to follow Section 3319.112 ORC regarding OTES, as it existed prior to the effective date of this amendment.

Section 3313.413 Community School:  Adjusts report card grades and ratings as a result of removing the scores of kindergarten students from the literacy progress measures.

The bill also makes a technical amendment to a provision that requires a board of education to offer property that it is selling to high performing community schools, college-preparatory boarding schools, and STEM schools.

Section 3313.608 Third Grade Reading Guarantee:  The bill amends this section to conform to the elimination of the kindergarten readiness assessment.

Other changes are made that align this section to changes in the OTES, and the assignment of teachers to students who are not reading at grade level.

Section 3319.075: Professional Development Plans:  The bill adds division (H) to the requirements for professional development plans.  This new division requires boards of education to use their professional development standards to guide professional growth plans and improvement plans resulting from teacher evaluations conducted under section 3319.111 of the ORC.

Section 3319.081 Nonteaching School Employees:  The bill allows nonteaching school employees hired by non-civil service school districts, to renew a limited contract after one year, and three additional limited contracts lasting two years.  At the end of the third two-year contract, the non-teaching employee would be eligible for a “continuing contract” (tenure).

Section 3319.088 Educational Aide Permits and Educational Paraprofessional Licenses:  Current law requires any nonteaching employee, whether working in a federally funded program or not, to have a permit or license in order to directly assist a teacher in a school district.

The bill re-defines “educational assistant” as any nonteaching employee who is working in a federally funded program and assists a teacher as defined in section 3318.09.  Therefore, the requirement to obtain an educational aide permit or paraprofessional license seems to only pertain to those working in a federal program.

The bill also removes in current law requirements that individuals seeking a permit meet minimum education, training, health, and character qualifications, but directs the State Board to adopt rules prescribing the types and requirements for educational aide permits.

The bill requires educational assistant applicants to undergo criminal records checks, and for the State Board of education to issue educational aide permits and educational paraprofessional licenses for candidates that meet the requirements.

The bill allows nonteaching employees who substitute for educational assistants to do so without a permit or license pursuant to this section.

Section 3319.111 Teacher Evaluations: The bill requires a board of education to update its standards-based teacher evaluation policy pursuant to Section 3319.112 no later than July 1, 2018.  Any changes in the policy will be implemented once the current teacher’s contract with the board of education expires.

The bill eliminates in division (B) the requirement that measures of student academic growth in a teacher’s evaluation include the value added progress dimension prescribed in section 3302.021 ORC, or an alternative student academic progress measure prescribed in section 3302.03.  Instead the bill requires that when measures of student performance are used as evidence in a teacher’s evaluation that those measures “be high-quality student data, as defined under division (A)(6) of section 3319.112 ORC.”

The bill retains in division (C)(2)(a) a provision that allowed a board of education to evaluate each teacher who received a rating of accomplished on the teacher’s most recent evaluation conducted under this section once every three school years.  But it replaces “so long as the teacher’s student academic growth measure, for the most recent school year for which data is available, is average or higher, as determined by the department of education” with “…so long as the teacher submits a self-directed professional growth plan to the evaluator that focuses on specific areas identified in the observations and evaluation and the evaluator determines that the teacher is making progress on that plan.”

The bill also retains in division (C)(2)(b) a provision that allows the board to evaluate each teacher who received a rating of skilled on the teacher’s most recent evaluation conducted under this section once every two school years.  But it replaces “so long as the teacher’s student academic growth measure, for the most recent school year for which data is available, is average or higher, as determined by the department of education” with “..so long as the teacher and evaluator jointly develop a professional growth plan for the teacher that focuses on specific areas identified in the observations and evaluations and the evaluator determines that the teacher is making progress on that plan.”

The bill retains the requirements that in any year that a teacher is not formally evaluated, a qualified individual conduct at least one observation and hold a conference with a teacher who is accomplished or skilled.  The conference must include a discussion of progress on the teacher’s professional growth plan.

The bill eliminates a provision in (E)(2) that allows the board of education to elect to require only one formal observation of a teacher who received a rating of accomplished on the teacher’s most recent evaluation, provided that the teacher complete an approved project.

Section 3319.112 Teacher Evaluations: The bill shifts the responsibility for revising the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) from the State Board to the ODE.

In division (A) the ODE is directed to revise OTES “… based on the recommendations of the educator standards board established under section 3319.60 of the Revised Code.” The ODE must submit a summary of the revisions to the State Board for review. Not later than May 1, 2018, the State Board must adopt the revised framework.  Local boards of education must update their teacher evaluations to conform to the updated framework by July 1, 2018.

The bill eliminates student academic growth as measured by the value added progress dimension or an alternative growth measure as a factor in OTES.  Instead, the bill requires that teacher evaluations be based on multiple evaluation factors; aligned with standards for teachers (Section 3319.61 ORC); including observations and classroom walkthroughs.

The bill retains the requirement that teachers be provided a written report of the evaluation.

Divisions (A)(6) and (7) in current law are eliminated.  These divisions pertain to measures of student academic growth for grade levels and subjects for which the value added progress dimension does not apply. Instead, the bill requires the use of student assessment instruments approved by the district board of education.

In addition, the bill prohibits the shared attribution of student performance data among all teachers in a district, building, grade, content area, or other group, and requires development of a professional growth plan or improvement plan for a teacher that is aligned to the school district or building improvement plan required under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

The ODE must also revise, “as necessary” specific standards and criteria that distinguish between the levels of performance for teachers and principals for the purpose of assigning ratings on the evaluations. The bill retains the current ratings as accomplished, skilled, developing, and ineffective.

The following are other provisions in this section:

  • Retains current provisions that require the ODE to assist school districts in developing evaluation policies under sections 3311.80, 3311.84, 3319.02, and 3319.111 ORC; serve as a clearinghouse of promising evaluation procedures and evaluation models that districts may use; and provide technical assistance to districts in creating evaluation policies.
  • Adds the requirement that the ODE provide guidance to districts on how “high-quality student data” may be used as evidence of student learning attributable to a particular teacher, and provide guidance to districts on how information from student surveys, student portfolios, peer review evaluations, teacher self-evaluations, and other components determined appropriate by the district may be used as part of the evaluation process.
  • Requires the ODE by July 1, 2018, in consultation with other state agencies that employ teachers, to update the standards-based framework for the evaluation of teachers who work in state agencies.

REPEALS Section 3319.114 Alternative Framework for Evaluating Teachers:  The alternative framework for evaluating Ohio teachers requires the teacher performance measure to account for 50 percent of each evaluation, and the student academic growth measure to account for 35 percent of each evaluation.  The remaining 15 percent of the evaluation can be based on the results of student surveys, teacher self-evaluations, peer review evaluations, and student portfolios. The bill repeals this section.

Section 3319.22 Educator Licenses: The term “educator license” in Ohio can refer to a level of license, such as resident, professional, senior, or lead professional license, or a type of license, such as an Early Childhood Education license, a Multi-age license, or a license to be an Intervention Specialist.

Ohio law currently does not specify grade levels for educator licenses.

The current grade-level licenses are included in the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) rules, which are approved by the State Board of Education and the Joint Commission on Agency Rule Review (JCARR).

These rules authorize licenses to be issued for many purposes through OAC Rule 3301-24-05, but the main types of educator license are “Early Childhood” (grades pre-kindergarten through three), “Middle Childhood” (grades four through nine in named curriculum areas), “Adolescence through Adult” (grades seven through twelve in named curriculum areas), and Multi-age Licenses (preK-12) issued in a particular subject area, such as dance, drama/theater, music, or visual art.

The bill retains the current levels of educator licenses (resident educator license; professional educator license; senior professional educator license; and lead professional educator license).

However, the bill also requires that each license level specify whether the educator is licensed to teach grades kindergarten through eighth grade or grades six through twelve, rather than the current grade level bands specified in the State Board rules.  The bill does not specify licenses for teaching subjects in grades preK-12, the current Multi-age license, or a license to teach preK, such as the current Early Childhood license.

The bill retains Section 3319.22(A)(1) which allows the State Board to issue any additional categories, types, and levels of educator licenses, and adopt rules for individuals to obtain an educator license.

The bill also retains the standards and qualifications for obtaining a residential, professional, senior, or lead professional license.  Requirements to obtain a grade-level license, such as Early Childhood license, or a license to teach music, are included in OAC rules.

NEW Section 3319.226 (Repeals former Section 3319.226) Substitute Teaching License:  Under current law (repealed by the bill) the State Board is required to issue educator licenses for substitute teaching that are valid for one year, five years, and any other length of time up to five years.

Instead, the bill requires beginning on July 1, 2018, that the State Board of Education issue educator licenses for substitute teaching under new Section 3319.226.

This provision requires the State Board to adopt rules establishing standards and requirements, but states that the rules “shall not require an applicant to hold a post-secondary degree in any specified subject area,” and “shall not restrict the number of school days that the holder of a license issued under this section may work.”

In addition, the holder of a license issued under repealed Section 3319.226 will be subject to the new requirements under law when their license is renewed.

NEW Section 3319.361 Employment: The bill allows a superintendent of a city, local, or exempted village school district to employ a person licensed under section 3319.22 of the Revised Code to teach a subject area or grade level for which the person is not licensed.

Section 3321.191 Student Absences:  The bill requires school attendance officers to only consider un-excused absences when determining if a student is “excessively” absent from school.  Current law requires the school to count excused and un-excused absences for students.  The school must notify parents, guardians, or custodians when a student is identified as “excessively absent”.

Section 3323.022 Staffing Ratios for Preschool Programs for Students with Disabilities:  The bill lowers the staffing ratio for half-day preschool programs for children with disabilities from sixteen to twelve children per staff member.

The bill also requires that each child served by a center-based teacher, receive a minimum of ten hours of services per week, unless otherwise specified in the student’s IEP.

NEW Section 3324.12 Gifted Education:  The bill prohibits the State Board from requiring a licensed educator, who is designated as a provider of gifted services, but who does not hold a license or endorsement specifically in gifted education, to complete 30 hours of professional development related to gifted education.

Section 3365.03 College Credit Plus Program:  The bill states that if a course is offered and delivered on the campus of a student’s secondary school under the college credit plus program, the student must take the course at the school, rather than on a college campus.

The bill allows for an exception if a course offered at the school is full.  In that case the superintendent, or equivalent, of the school can allow a student to enroll in a comparable course that is delivered on the college campus, at another location operated by the college, or online.

Section 3365.07 College Credit Plus Textbook Purchases:  The bill states that beginning with participation for the 2018-2019 school year, section 3365.072 of the Revised Code shall govern all arrangements for the provision and payment of textbooks under the program.

NEW Section 3365.072 states that under the college credit plus program, 50 percent of the cost of textbooks for students who elect to participate under division (B) of Section 3365.06 ORC during 2018-2019 school year and thereafter, will be paid by the student’s secondary school, and 50 percent by the student.

The bill exempts a student who is identified as economically disadvantaged according to rules adopted by the ODE, and 100 percent of the cost of the textbooks will by paid by the secondary school that the student attends.

The bill also requires each home-instructed participant enrolled in the college credit plus program to be responsible for the cost of textbooks required for courses under the program.

Uncodified Law Section 3:  The bill requires the ODE to conduct a study on the results and cost-effectiveness of the college credit plus program, and submit a report of its findings to the Governor, the Chancellor of Higher Education, each member of the General Assembly, and the superintendent of each school district and each educational service center no later than one year after the effective date of this section.

The study must include the cost-effectiveness for secondary schools and students, the amount of money students save on college tuition, and the amount of time that students take to graduate.

Huffman:  Reducing mandates better for state’s students,” by Melanie Speicher, limaohio.com, October 12, 2017

SB216 as introduced

SB216 analysis prepared by the Ohio Legislative Service Commission

BACKGROUND

Requirements in Law Regarding Teaching Licenses 

Chapter 3319:  Schools-Superintendent; Teachers; Employees of the Ohio Revised Code, specifies the professional qualifications of teachers, principals, and superintendents, the levels of educator licenses, employment of teachers, professional development requirements, nonteaching employees, and more.

Section 3319.22 Standards and requirements for educator licenses; local professional development committees, directs the State Board of Education to issue four levels of educator licenses: a resident educator license, a professional educator license, a senior professional educator license, and a lead professional educator license.

The State Board may issue any additional categories, types, and levels of educator licenses, and has done so under Ohio Administrative Code Rules 3301-24-05.

The law also requires the State Board to adopt rules establishing the standards and requirements for obtaining each educator license, in addition to minimum standards and qualifications included in law.

Non-licensed Teachers

The Ohio Revised Code also includes provisions for non-licensed individuals to teach.

Section 3319.301 Board to issue permits to qualified nonlicensed individuals, requires the State Board to “issue permits to individuals who are not licensed as required by sections 3319.22 to 3319.30 of the Revised Code, but who are otherwise qualified, to teach classes for not more than a total of twelve hours a week, except that an individual teaching in a STEM school may teach classes for not more than a total of forty hours a week.”

The law also includes minimum requirements, such as “possession of a baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degree in, or significant experience related to, the subject the individual is to teach.” The nonlicensed teacher also must work under the supervision of a licensed teacher.

Exemptions for High Performing Schools

 Section 3302.151 was approved in Senate Bill 3 of the 131st General Assembly and expanded the practice of exempting school districts from the state’s teacher licensing standards.

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, along with the Ohio Education Association and the Ohio Federation of Teachers, testified against several provisions of the bill in the House and Senate, and some changes were made before it passed.  But the law still exempts a “high performing school district”, which is defined in division (D) of the section, from the following:

  • Teacher qualification requirements under the third-grade reading guarantee
  • The mentoring component of the Ohio teacher residency program
  • Any provision of the Revised Code or rule or standard of the state board of education prescribing a minimum or maximum class size
  • Any provision of the Revised Code or rule or standard of the State Board requiring teachers to be licensed specifically in the grade level in which they are teaching, unless otherwise prescribed by federal law. This exemption does not apply to special education teachers, and teachers must still hold a valid Ohio license in the subject area in which the teacher is teaching, and at least some grade level experience determined appropriate by the district board.

This law also allows the superintendent of a high performing school district to “employ an individual who is not licensed as required by sections 3319.22 to 3319.30 of the Revised Code, but who is otherwise qualified based on experience, to teach classes in the district, so long as the board of education of the school district approves the individual’s employment and provides mentoring and professional development opportunities to that individual, as determined necessary by the board.” The individual must also pass a criminal records check.

To qualify as a “high performing school district” the school district must meet the following requirements:

  • The district received at least eighty-five per cent of the total possible points for the performance index score calculated under division (C)(1)(b) of that section
  • The district received a grade of an “A” for performance indicators met under division (C) (1)(c) of that section
  • The district has a four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate of at least ninety-three per cent and a five-year adjusted cohort graduation rate of at least ninety-five per cent, as calculated under division (C)(1)(d) of that section.

A school district that meets these requirements can qualify for the exemptions for three school years, beginning with the school year in which the qualifying report card is issued.

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Portrait of an Arts Advocate: Kelly Berick

berick13Kelly Berick, Director of Dance
Akron School for the Arts at Firestone High School, Akron, OH

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?
A: My mother placed me in dance classes at age 3 to reverse an inward hip rotation issue that developed from birth through my toddler years. I stuck with dance through the rest of my life. I also took piano lessons, played the bass clarinet in my school band, sang in my church choir, and took years art classes both at our recreation center and at school. I spent 6 years in a preprofessional ballet company in junior high and high school, then pursued a BA in Dance at Columbia College (SC) and later a M.Ed. in Dance at Temple University.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.
A: I was a member of a small modern dance troupe in Columbia, SC, and I was the company’s artist-in-residence in public schools across the state. I have numerous fond memories of those elementary school students during that four-year period, but one in particular made me realize that public schools was where I belonged and where dance and I could make a difference. I conducted an improvisation on “focus” to a group of 5th grade students. In one amazing moment, in a crowded room of 25 boys and girls, a boy, in slow motion, stepped out and over a girl in a low level stretched position. Neither of them looked at the other, but both knew of the other’s presence and planned accordingly. I realized in that moment that any kid can benefit from this work, any kid can be successful in this work, and that dance moment was more skillful and focused than even the most competitive and complicated dance step ever created, and it was completely improvised by two inexperienced movers inside of a crowd of other bodies. I’ve been in schools ever since.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?
A: I enjoy the art and creativity of creating a great dance lesson, and I enjoy creating dance works with my students as collaborators. Daily though, I enjoy the structured improvisation of cooking! I like planning the week’s meals, improvising with my leftovers, and trying new spins on recipes. That’s feeding my soul as much as my body these days. I feel connected to my grandparents and to our old farmland when I’m growing vegetables and working with them in the kitchen.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.
A: I am currently looking at my program through an equity lens. While I currently serve all types of students with varying experiences, I am looking for ways to give those with less dance background more opportunities while also continuing to challenge my experienced students and paving their pathways into university dance programs. Time and space constraints are the problems, not to mention the need to establish a culture of mutual respect and peer leadership/support. Can we be all things to all people?

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.
A: Dr. Edrie Ferdun, professor emeritus of Temple University created a classroom experience for incoming graduate students that changed my life forever. I seek daily to create the sense of passion for dance/the arts, democracy, mutual respect and admiration, and family that she created in that year with my high school students. She balanced planning with spontaneity in a way that was so beneficial and human. With high school students, my aim is to eliminate the idea that dance is competitive and everyone must always strive to be better than the rest. Edrie’s class promoted selflessness and a joy for our differences. There’s not enough of that in dance world today.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?
A: It is always helpful to be present in your child’s school, helping the arts area teachers, fundraising for guest artist residencies (like the ones I used to do!), offering letters of support for arts projects the teachers would like to take on, and of course, going to bat when arts programs are on the line in budget talks. Talking to elected representatives at the local and state level keeps your school’s arts education in the conversation. Joining organizations that support the arts is a great way to lend your support to initiatives and legislation crucial to arts education. These organizations can help you remain educated about the benefits of arts education and the effect that arts have on culture. And of course, patronize your area arts events: go to the theater, the gallery, and the concert hall. Leave the comfort of your couch, and I guarantee that you will come back to it with feelings you never had before.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

Posted in Portrait of an Arts Advocate | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update November 13, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Senate Education Committee 

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Proponent testimony on SB216 (Huffman) To enact the “Ohio Public School Deregulation Act” regarding the administration of preschool and primary and secondary education programs.

Proponent testimony on SB216 was given by more than a dozen school superintendents who had an integral part in drafting the bill. They voiced their support for the measure which would reduce nearly 100 laws, policies and rules that school districts must follow but feel have become burdensome.

Among the bill’s wide-ranging provisions are those to allow teachers to teach outside of their licensed certification in particular cases, eliminate the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment; allow students to take paper or computer third-grade reading tests, widen grade band certifications for teachers, and eliminate the K-3 literacy component on state report cards. In addition, it would also make changes to teacher evaluations, staffing policies, reporting requirements and more. (Bill Summary)

Joseph Spiccia, Chair of the Lake/Geauga Superintendents’ Collaborative Chair and superintendent of the Wickliffe City School District, said the bill gives educators and administrators a chance respond to various state mandates that have come down in recent years. “This is an opportunity to respond positively to the concerns that have been expressed by school leaders, teachers and other practitioners in the field related to how we can more effectively educate students in our schools,” he said.

The superintendent of St. Henry Local School District, Julie Garke, echoed the sentiment. “For too many years, local districts, the Ohio Department of Education and the legislature have operated as separate entities, doing what they feel is best for their organizations. Because of that, we have seen many regulations dictating how schools should be run instead of allowing for individualization of education for students as decided by local boards of education.”

Waynesfield-Goshen Schools Superintendent Chris Pfister testified to the committee regarding the many rules and regulations that have come down from the state, “They add no value, cost significant amounts of money and pull focus away from the missions of teaching and student learning.”

The October 23 issue of Arts On Line provides an overview of SB216, and OAAE offers a full analysis of the proposed legislation on our website.

HB170 Reported out by Committee (Carfagna, Duffey) HB170 was reported out of the Senate Education Committee last week. The bill calls for the Department of Education to create computer science standards and lays out how related courses would be integrated into schools. It is permissive and does not require schools to offer computer science classes.

The measure allows students to substitute computer science for Algebra II or an advanced study science course. Opponents questioned the move because Algebra II is a prerequisite for admission into most Ohio colleges and universities.

Proponent testimony on SB34 (Manning) To generally require public and chartered nonpublic schools to open for instruction after Labor Day.

Mike Caputo, a former Bay Village Board of Education member, testified in favor on SB34. “I believe that Senate Bill 34 will force school boards across Ohio to reexamine how a school calendar is set,” he said. “Specifically, the acceptance of starting school prior to Labor Day has offered built-in flexibility for schools to offer additional days off, additional in-service days and extended breaks, which may not be in the best educational interest of the student.”

House Speaker’s Task Force on Education and Poverty The Speaker’s House Task Force on Education and Poverty heard three different presentations on the benefits of providing wrap around behavioral health services to students with trauma or outside pressures. Such services can help students pay attention, learn and subsequently help close the achievement gap.

Teresa Lampl, Associate Director of the Ohio Council of Behavioral Health and Family Service Providers, presented an overview of the current state of mental health for young people. She indicated that half of all behavioral health issues present before age 14 and 75 percent of such issues show up before age 24. One in eight children are clinically depressed by the time they reach adolescence.

Lampl sited research that has shown student outcomes, and subsequently long-term health, can be improved by coordinating community behavioral health care services inside schools. Students in such programs show decreased symptoms of depression and disciplinary referrals in addition to improved grades and standardized test scores. Bringing treatment to schools not only reduces barriers to treatment, but also destigmatizes it.

Also speaking was Joe Shorokey, CEO of Alta Behavioral Healthcare, who explained the services that his company provides to about 30 schools in Mahoning County and the Youngstown area.

“Our job is to help set the table for learning. We have kids coming in hungry, having dirty clothes, with trauma, there was a shooting down the street, for example,” Shorokey testified. “They come in carrying this weight. There is a tremendous need to address the nonacademic barriers to learning.”

The final meeting of the task force will be held on Thursday, November 16 and will feature perspectives from task force members on what has worked in their schools and their policy recommendations.

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE

Kelly Berick, Director of Dance
Akron School for the Arts at Firestone High School, Akron, OH

berick13

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?
A: My mother placed me in dance classes at age 3 to reverse an inward hip rotation issue that developed from birth through my toddler years. I stuck with dance through the rest of my life. I also took piano lessons, played the bass clarinet in my school band, sang in my church choir, and took years art classes both at our recreation center and at school. I spent 6 years in a preprofessional ballet company in junior high and high school, then pursued a BA in Dance at Columbia College (SC) and later a M.Ed. in Dance at Temple University.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.
A: I was a member of a small modern dance troupe in Columbia, SC, and I was the company’s artist-in-residence in public schools across the state. I have numerous fond memories of those elementary school students during that four-year period, but one in particular made me realize that public schools was where I belonged and where dance and I could make a difference. I conducted an improvisation on “focus” to a group of 5th grade students. In one amazing moment, in a crowded room of 25 boys and girls, a boy, in slow motion, stepped out and over a girl in a low level stretched position. Neither of them looked at the other, but both knew of the other’s presence and planned accordingly. I realized in that moment that any kid can benefit from this work, any kid can be successful in this work, and that dance moment was more skillful and focused than even the most competitive and complicated dance step ever created, and it was completely improvised by two inexperienced movers inside of a crowd of other bodies. I’ve been in schools ever since.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?
A: I enjoy the art and creativity of creating a great dance lesson, and I enjoy creating dance works with my students as collaborators. Daily though, I enjoy the structured improvisation of cooking! I like planning the week’s meals, improvising with my leftovers, and trying new spins on recipes. That’s feeding my soul as much as my body these days. I feel connected to my grandparents and to our old farmland when I’m growing vegetables and working with them in the kitchen.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.
A: I am currently looking at my program through an equity lens. While I currently serve all types of students with varying experiences, I am looking for ways to give those with less dance background more opportunities while also continuing to challenge my experienced students and paving their pathways into university dance programs. Time and space constraints are the problems, not to mention the need to establish a culture of mutual respect and peer leadership/support. Can we be all things to all people?

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.
A: Dr. Edrie Ferdun, professor emeritus of Temple University created a classroom experience for incoming graduate students that changed my life forever. I seek daily to create the sense of passion for dance/the arts, democracy, mutual respect and admiration, and family that she created in that year with my high school students. She balanced planning with spontaneity in a way that was so beneficial and human. With high school students, my aim is to eliminate the idea that dance is competitive and everyone must always strive to be better than the rest. Edrie’s class promoted selflessness and a joy for our differences. There’s not enough of that in dance world today.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?
A: It is always helpful to be present in your child’s school, helping the arts area teachers, fundraising for guest artist residencies (like the ones I used to do!), offering letters of support for arts projects the teachers would like to take on, and of course, going to bat when arts programs are on the line in budget talks. Talking to elected representatives at the local and state level keeps your school’s arts education in the conversation. Joining organizations that support the arts is a great way to lend your support to initiatives and legislation crucial to arts education. These organizations can help you remain educated about the benefits of arts education and the effect that arts have on culture. And of course, patronize your area arts events: go to the theater, the gallery, and the concert hall. Leave the comfort of your couch, and I guarantee that you will come back to it with feelings you never had before.

Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

 

OHIO ELECTIONS
StateImpact Ohio: Ohio Levy Results Stick to Historical Trends
“Voters approved three out of four school levies on the ballot during Tuesday’s general election, but an Ohio economist who studies school funding says some concerning trends are emerging from those results.

Columbus-based economist Howard Fleeter said by his count, 76 percent of the operating levies on the ballot this week were approved by voters. A majority of them, however, were renewals, when a district asks voters to reapprove an old levy for the same amount of money.”

Associated Press: Voters Approve Most Ohio School Levies
“Schools officials say Ohio voters have approved the majority of ballot measures for funding local schools. The Ohio School Boards Association says 87 out of 122 issues on Tuesday’s ballots around the state were passed. The Columbus-based association says 23 of 53 new money requests were approved, while 64 of 69 renewal or replacement issues passed.”

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, November 13

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus
State Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, November 14

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus
State Board of Education Meeting

4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Hearing Room 121
House Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

HB21 (Hambley) Fourth Hearing, All Testimony
COMMUNITY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT VERIFICATION Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

Substitute Bill HB200 (Koehler) Seventh Hearing, All Testimony
AMENDMENTS OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM CREATION To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

HB338 (Ginter) First Hearing, Sponsor Testimony
BUS DRIVER MEDICAL EXAMS Regarding medical examinations for school bus drivers.

HB377 (Hagan, Ramos) Third Hearing, All Testimony
CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE EDUCATION With respect to age-appropriate student instruction in child sexual abuse and sexual violence prevention and in-service staff training in child sexual abuse prevention.

Wednesday, November 15

11:00 a.m. Ohio Statehouse Hearing Room 114
House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee Chair: Blessing

HB87 (Roenger) Fourth Hearing, All Testimony, AMENDMENTS
COMMUNITY SCHOOL PUBLIC MONEYS Regarding public moneys returned to the state as a result of a finding for recovery issued pursuant to an audit of a community school.

Thursday, November 16
1:30 p.m. Verne Riffe Center for Government and the Arts, 31st floor, rooms South B & C
Joint Education Oversight Committee
Agenda TBA

 

FYI ARTS

OAC’s Collins Elected to National Arts Assembly
Ohio Arts Council (OAC) Executive Director Donna Collins has been elected to the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) board of directors. She will serve a three-year term.

The board of directors is the governing body of the nonprofit NASAA. “It is also a nationally representative policy board that works on behalf of public funding for the arts for all American communities,” OAC said in a release.

The board includes representatives from 20 states and U.S. jurisdictions who encourage state and federal support for the arts and broaden opportunities for arts participation across America in geographically, artistically, culturally and economically diverse settings. More on NASAA’s 2018 board of directors can be found here.

 

Seeking High School Arts Advocates for Arts Day 2018

OCAThe Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation is offering a unique opportunity for high school students to participate in Ohio’s annual Arts Day and Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. Several Ohio high schools will be chosen to send a team of students to Columbus to serve as student advocates. The students will participate in a range of activities highlighting the importance of the arts and arts education. This is a valuable opportunity for the students to participate in the public policy process in a meaningful way.

Arts Day 2018 takes place on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 in Columbus. To apply, submit a brief statement expressing your school’s interest and what you hope to achieve by participating in the student advocates program. The statement must be submitted by December 15, 2017.

Program details

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Sing Me A Story

The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for PK-1 teachers on Wednesday, November 29. Deborah Sunya Moore, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “Sing Me A Story” from 4:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center. Participants will be led through several lesson plans that explore elements of music within the text of a book such as steady beat and musical forms such as echo, call & response, and verse-chorus. Email Debbie Stoler at Tri-County ESC to register. The event flyer is available online.

Location: Tri-County ESC, Wooster
Date: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.

 

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update November 6, 2017

THE VALUE OF THE ARTS

While the value of the arts is undeniable it is sometimes hard to quantify.  The Americans for the Arts recently published 10 Reasons to Support the Arts which includes statistics on the significant benefits the arts provide.  Take time to read and share this encouraging information!

10 Reasons to Support the Arts

Americans for the Arts, Randy I. Cohen

The arts are fundamental to our humanity. They ennoble and inspire us—fostering creativity, goodness, and beauty. The arts bring us joy, help us express our values, and build bridges between cultures. The arts are also a fundamental component of a healthy community—strengthening them socially, educationally, and economically—benefits that persist even in difficult social and economic times.

  1. Arts improve individual well-being. 63 percent of the population believe the arts “lift me up beyond everyday experiences,” 64 percent feel the arts give them “pure pleasure to experience and participate in,” and 73 percent say the arts are a “positive experience in a troubled world.”

2. Arts unify communities. 67 percent of Americans believe “the arts unify our communities regardless of age, race, and ethnicity” and 62 percent agree that the arts “helps me understand other cultures better”—a perspective observed across all demographic and economic categories.

3. Arts improve academic performance. Students engaged in arts learning have higher GPAs, standardized test scores, and college-going rates as well as lower drop-out rates. These academic benefits are reaped by students regardless of socio-economic status. Yet, the Department of Education reports that access to arts education for students of color is significantly lower than for their white peers. 88 percent of Americans believe that arts are part of a well-rounded K-12 education.

4. Arts strengthen the economy. The production of arts and cultural goods in the U.S. added $730 billion to the economy in 2014, and included a $30 billion international trade surplus. The arts represented a larger share of the nation’s economy (4.2 percent of GDP) than transportation, tourism, and agriculture (U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis). The nonprofit arts industry alone generates $166.3 billion in economic activity annually (spending by organizations and their audiences), which supports 4.6 million jobs and generates $27.5 billion in government revenue.

5. Arts drive tourism and revenue to local businesses. Attendees at nonprofit arts events spend $31.47 per person, per event, beyond the cost of admission on items such as meals, parking, and babysitters—valuable commerce for local businesses. 34 percent of attendees live outside the county in which the arts event takes place; they average $47.57 in event-related spending. Arts travelers are ideal tourists, staying longer and spending more to seek out authentic cultural experiences.

6. Arts spark creativity and innovation. Creativity is among the top 5 applied skills sought by business leaders, per the Conference Board’s Ready to Innovate report—with 72 percent saying creativity is of high importance when hiring. Research on creativity shows that Nobel laureates in the sciences are 17 times more likely to be actively engaged in the arts than other scientists.

7. Arts drive the creative industries. The Creative Industries are arts businesses that range from nonprofit museums, symphonies, and theaters to for-profit film, architecture, and design companies. A 2017 analysis of Dun & Bradstreet data counts 673,656 businesses in the U.S. involved in the creation or distribution of the arts—4.01 percent of all businesses and 2.04 percent of all employees.

8. Arts have social impact. University of Pennsylvania researchers have demonstrated that a high concentration of the arts in a city leads to higher civic engagement, more social cohesion, higher child welfare, and lower poverty rates.

9. Arts improve healthcare. Nearly one-half of the nation’s healthcare institutions provide arts programming for patients, families, and even staff. 78 percent deliver these programs because of their healing benefits to patients—shorter hospital stays, better pain management, and less medication.

10. Arts for the health and well-being of our military. The arts heal the mental, physical, and moral injuries of war for military servicemembers and Veterans, who rank the creative arts therapies in the top 4 (out of 40) interventions and treatments. Across the military continuum, the arts promote resilience during pre-deployment, deployment, and the reintegration of military servicemembers, Veterans, their families, and caregivers into communities.

 
OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Proponent testimony on HB318 (Patterson, LaTourette) This measure would standardize the role of the Student Resource Officer (SRO) in schools, require new SROs to receive 40 hours of training and create a list of qualities districts should consider when making hiring decisions. HB318 was created as a response to Ohio’s deadliest school shooting at Chardon High School in 2012.   Tim Armelli, a teacher and coach at CHS, was present when a student opened fire in their building and testified before the committee that it’s important SROs are trained properly.  “Throughout Ohio there currently exists confusion and inconsistency in the term and training of School Resource Officers. Local school officials can use the term school resource officer as they see fit. They can determine what training, if any, a school resource officer needs,” he said. “We need to set a standard by which the people in our buildings, with the task of protecting our children’s lives, are held to a high standard of moral, ethical, and legal responsibility.”

Proponent testimony on HB338 (Ginter)  This bill would amend current law to include licensed chiropractors as medical professionals who are qualified to perform an annual physical exam for school bus drivers.  Chiropractors are one of a few types of healthcare professionals who can be certified by the Federal Motor Carry Safety Administration to provide driver examinations.  Brandy Spaulding, director of Chiropractic Services for the Ohio State Chiropractic Association, told the committee that chiropractors are already using their certification to perform state-required physicals on truck drivers and the bill would expand their expertise to school bus drivers.

Proponent testimony on HB360 (Greenspan) HB360 would enact the Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act.  This bill addresses school discipline, bullying and hazing policies at public schools and would provide a standard general protocol for addressing acts of bullying and hazing while continuing to respect the concept of local control.

Senate Education Committee
The committee will hear testimony on several bills this week, including:
 
Proponent testimony on SB216 (Huffman) SB216, the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act, was developed based on recommendations from school superintendents across the state. The bill’s intent is to reduce regulations and mandates for local schools to increase local control, improve efficiency, reduce costs, and improve student achievement. But the repeal of other mandates, such as the requirement that teachers be certified in the subjects that they are teaching, could lower the quality and effectiveness of classroom instruction, which could lower student achievement. The October 23 issue of Arts On Line provides an overview of SB216, and OAAE has a full analysis of the proposed legislation on our website.

 
 
OHIO EDUCATION & PUBLIC POLICY

StateImpact Ohio: Later School Bells Could Lead to Economic Growth for Ohio

“More than half of Ohio’s schools ring their first bell before 8 a.m., but a new study shows, if that time was pushed back, it could make a positive impact on the state’s economy.  Previous studies have shown when school starts later, students will see both an academic and health benefit from the extra sleep over the course of their academic careers, but the Rand Corporation – an international think tank – found an economic benefits as well.

Shifting to an 8:30 a.m. school start time would result in an additional $435 million in economic output for Ohio in two years. In 10 years, that number grows to nearly $4 billion, according to the study.”

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: Ohio Department of Education Recognizes First Eight Purple Star Schools

“In a celebration at Hamilton Township High School, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria announced the first eight Ohio schools to receive the Purple Star Award for their commitment to serving military-connected students and families.

‘A supportive school environment can have a significant impact on our military-connected students,” said Superintendent DeMaria. ‘These Purple Star schools provide our children and families with the resources they need to be successful. We’re thankful for their service and honored to continue the important work of improving services for Ohio’s military families.’

The first eight schools to receive the Purple Star Award are:

  • Beverly Gardens Elementary School (Mad River Local Schools, Montgomery County)
  • Caldwell High School (Caldwell Exempted Village Local Schools, Noble County)
  • Hamilton Township High School (Hamilton Local Schools, Franklin County)
  • Liberty Middle School (Olentangy Local Schools, Delaware County)
  • Oak Harbor Middle School (Benton-Carroll-Salem Local Schools, Ottawa County)
  • Swanton Middle School (Swanton Local Schools, Lucas County)
  • Trebein Elementary School (Beavercreek City Schools, Greene County)
  • Wooster High School (Wooster City Schools, Wayne County)

The Purple Star Award for military friendly schools recognizes schools that show a major commitment to serving students and families connected to our nation’s armed forces. Purple Star awardees receive a special Purple Star recognition to display in their buildings. The Purple Star Advisory Board, formed by the Ohio departments of Education, Higher Education, Veterans Services and Adjutant General, helps decide eligibility.”

ODE: Strengthening Educational Leader Supports

“Quality leadership is essential to the success of any organization. As the Ohio Department of Education works together with education stakeholders to strengthen pre-kindergarten through grade 12 education, it is important to focus on strategies supporting principals’ continuous improvement and journeys to excellence.

The Department, in partnership with the Ohio Association of Elementary School Administrators and the Ohio Association of Secondary School Administrators, identified individuals throughout the state to participate in a community of practice, or workgroup of advisors. This workgroup examined what we can do in Ohio to support high-quality leadership practices aimed at addressing the needs of principals and all students they serve.  

The conclusions and recommendations of the workgroup appear in the following report: Strengthening Educational Leader Supports

The principal workgroup identified five areas in which Ohio can map a route for improving principal effectiveness: education and preparation for serving in the principal role; recruitment and job seeking; assignment to appropriate settings; supportive experiences; and ongoing professional development and supports. ”

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Wednesday, November 8

1:30 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

SB105 Tavares 3rd Hearing, All testimony

MONTH DESIGNATION

HB170 Carfagna, Duffey 5th Hearing, All testimony

COMPUTER SCIENCE

SB34 Manning 4th Hearing, All testimony

ACADEMIC YEAR

SB216 Huffman 2nd Hearing, Proponent

SCHOOL DEREGULATION ACT

 

OHIO NEWS

Columbus Dispatch: Kasich urges manufacturers to ‘stick your nose’ in schools

“Ohio manufacturers need to go back to school, Gov. John Kasich told the Ohio Manufacturers’ Association on Wednesday.  ‘Stick your nose in the school district,’ Kasich told an audience of about 400 gathered at the Greater Columbus Convention Center to discuss workforce development amid a shortage of qualified workers.  The governor lamented a ‘disconnect’ between businesses and schools, saying, ‘You need to be out there in these schools.'”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

The US Department of Education recently announced the withdrawal of nearly 600 pieces of subregulatory guidance as part of an effort to reduce the federal regulatory burden. The items identified for withdrawal were identified by the recently formed USDOE Regulatory Reform Task Force. The Task Force, composed of career and non-career employees, has spent the last six months reviewing USDOE documents and identified hundreds of documents ready for withdrawal due to being superseded by current law or simply out-of-date. The USDOE did not rescind any Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) guidance related to evidence-based interventions for low-performing schools, Title IV Student Support and Academic Enrichment grants guidance, or documents previously released from its office for civil rights.

 

USDOE: Department of Education Withdraws Outdated Subregulatory Guidance

As part of the ongoing Administration-wide effort to reduce the regulatory burden on Americans, today the Department of Education announced it will withdraw nearly 600 out-of-date pieces of subregulatory guidance on its books. Each item has been either superseded by current law or is no longer in effect. Removing these out-of-date materials will make it easier for schools, educators, parents and the public to understand what guidance is still in effect.” 

Washington Post: Education Department withdrawing nearly 600 policy documents it says are outdated

“The Education Department said Friday it is withdrawing nearly 600 policy guidance documents it says are outdated, including 72 in special education previously announced and others in offices dealing with K-12 and higher education.  The move is part of a broader effort by the Trump administration to reduce existing or planned regulations, many of them from the Obama administration.” 

US News & World Report: Education Department to Withdraw 600 ‘Out-of-Date’ Guidance Documents

“The Department of Education announced Friday it is in the process of withdrawing nearly 600 pieces of guidance – regulations federals officials say are “out of date” but which some advocates say are an attempt to rollback protections for minorities and disabled students.  ‘Each item has been either superseded by current law or is no longer in effect,’ Education Department officials wrote in a press release. ‘Removing these out-of-date materials will make it easier for schools, educators, parents and the public to understand what guidance is still in effect.'”

 

FYI ARTS

Seeking High School Arts Advocates for Arts Day 2018

OCAThe Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation is offering a unique opportunity for high school students to participate in Ohio’s annual Arts Day and Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. Several Ohio high schools will be chosen to send a team of students to Columbus to serve as student advocates. The students will participate in a range of activities highlighting the importance of the arts and arts education. This is a valuable opportunity for the students to participate in the public policy process in a meaningful way.

Arts Day 2018 takes place on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 in Columbus. To apply, submit a brief statement expressing your school’s interest and what you hope to achieve by participating in the student advocates program. The statement must be submitted by December 15, 2017.

Program details

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 

Scientific Thought in Motion

The Mansfield team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for teachers on Thursday, November 9. The free workshop will guide teachers through the translation of basic concepts in science into meaningful, self-assessing movement activities that put abstract ideas into tangible, visible form.

Location: Renaissance Theatre, Mansfield
Date: November 9, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Registration and program details

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1b5630a4-43c0-4c81-baee-ad930f9b9173.pdf

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update October 30, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Opponent testimony on HB176 (Thompson): This legislation would make changes to standards, assessments, model curricula, teacher evaluations and graduation requirements. The Ohio Federation of Teachers (OFT) was one of nine different organizations who testified in opposition of HB176. Under the bill, the State Board of Education would be required to adopt English and math standards that were in place in Massachusetts prior to 2010.  “Changing the standards will not do anything to move the needle, at least not in a positive direction. All it will do is create another distraction that will keep us from focusing on meeting the needs of our students,” Melissa Cropper, President of OFT told the committee.

Other opponents echoed the same sentiment and reminded the committee of the time and money spent by districts to implement the most recent standard changes.  “Suggesting that we should now walk back all of that work and instead begin the process of implementing a completely new set of standards that were developed with no input from Ohio educators, parents and community members is not in the best interest of Ohio’s students, ” Char Shryock, Director of Curriculum for Bay Village City Schools, explained.

Sponsor testimony on HB224 (Ingram): This bill would allow districts to re-serve time- and temperature-controlled food items to students if the items are unused and returned unopened and undamaged in the original packaging. Bill sponsor Catherine Ingram (D-Cincinnati) said the bill would allow districts across the state to save food that currently has to be thrown out.

Sponsor testimony on HB360 (Greenspan):  Dave Greenspan (R-Westlake) provided sponsor testimony on the legislation that would enact the Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act. This bill addresses school discipline, bullying and hazing policies at public schools and would “provide a standard general protocol for addressing acts of bullying and hazing while continuing to respect the concept of local control,” Greenspan testified.  He continued to explain that he chose to remove law enforcement action that could be taken against an individual engaged in the act of bullying but that individuals could still seek charges against bullies if they cause physical harm.

House Government Accountability and Oversight Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following bill last week:

Interested party testimony on HB312: This legislation focuses on the use of credit cards and debit cards by political subdivisions.

Senate Local Government, Public Safety and Veterans Affairs Committee

The committee passed HB8. This bill would prohibit disclosing information about minors who are involved in school bus accidents.

Passed by the House

The House passed SB3 by a vote of 91-0. This legislation designates the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week and is now headed to the Governor for signature.

House Speaker’s Task Force on Education and Poverty

The House Speaker’s Task Force on Education and Poverty met Thursday to hear presentations from the Ohio Department of Education, Groundwork Ohio and Big Brothers Big Sisters, among others.  The presentations focused on the importance of mentorship in student development and the impact that the state’s pre-K education efforts are having on the Ohio’s children.

Susan Tave Zelman, Executive Director in the Office of the Superintendent at the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), talked about how at-risk students who have mentors are 52 percent less likely than their peers to skip a day of school, 37 percent less likely to skip a class, and 55 percent more likely to enroll in college.

Zelman said the ODE Community Connectors program, which was founded in 2014, targets school districts with a student body that is at least 40 percent economically disadvantaged or with a graduation rate below 92 percent. “The … community connectors are based on numerous academic studies that demonstrate that mentoring is essential for at-risk students. Mentors connect with young people to foster personal growth and social opportunity. However, one in three at-risk students grow up without mentoring,” she said.

On Thursday, November 9, the Taskforce will hear presentations from Mary Ronan, former Cincinnati Public Schools superintendent, and the Ohio Council of Behavioral Health and Family Services Providers on wrap-around services in schools.  Chair Bob Cupp plans to hold a “wrap-up” meeting to hear from task force members on their perspectives on what works to improve schools the following Thursday, November 16.

 

OHIO EDUCATION & PUBLIC POLICY

Three different Ohio-based organizations released reports this week addressing early childhood education and its importance to the state moving forward. 

The Ohio Business Roundtable: “What Difference Are We Making?”

This report assessed the state of early learning in Ohio. Among its recommendations were to fast-track significant state investment to take proven programs to scale, pursue quality programs, and strengthen leadership to sustain effective cross-agency decision making.

The Health Policy Institute of Ohio: “The Importance of Early Learning”

The brief included policy options to enhance early learning in the state, such as: increasing the number of children served by high-quality child care, preschool, and pre-K; encouraging community-based partnerships; supporting ongoing training and technical assistance; and more.

Groundwork Ohio: “Ohio Early Childhood Education Gubernatorial Reference Manual.”

As a nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy organization committed to advancing quality early care and education, Groundwork Ohio released its manual intended to serve as a resource for Ohio gubernatorial candidates.  The manual provides a collection of high-level research and news media reports that tell a story supporting a case for increased investment in early childhood education.

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Ohio Launches SuccessBound Initiative

“In opening remarks to conference attendees, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria launched the SuccessBound initiative that brings together Ohio’s strong business and education partnerships to engage and inspire students about career opportunities.”

“The success of our students is fundamental to our future as a society. When we can connect education to real careers for students, they’re more engaged in their learning,” said DeMaria. “Together, we can help students find their paths and passions while building a future workforce for businesses.”

“Many students are unaware of the different career-focused opportunities available to them. The SuccessBound initiative will address this knowledge gap and help nurture a strong and qualified talent pipeline in Ohio by strengthening the relationship between schools, businesses and communities. Click here to see SuccessBound in action and watch videos of real SuccessBound partners in Ohio.

SuccessBound Students:

  • Take active roles in planning their future by exploring career interests early and consider how they align their interests to careers;
  • Consider what education and training is needed to reach their goals;
  • Respond to financial concerns by earning free college credits in high school and follow a pathway that allows them to work in a related field while continuing their education; and
  • Dedicate themselves to long-term goals and commit to continuous, lifelong learning.

SuccessBound Schools:

  • Research and respond to the economic needs of their communities;
  • Provide education pathways that give students the skills they need for in-demand jobs and for a remediation-free college experience;
  • Encourage work-based learning experiences and internships and offer rich, engaging learning experiences to students; and
  • Encourage students to plan for their future careers and take stock of what skills and resources they need for those careers.

SuccessBound Businesses:

  • Collaborate with schools to develop the local workforce;
  • Invest in schools to create educational pathways and provide work-based learning experiences that prepare students for jobs that are available now; and
  • Communicate openly with schools about what skills students need to have when they graduate.”

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, October 31
3:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121
House Education & Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB338  (Ginter, T.) 2nd Hearing-Proponent
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
HB318 (Patterson, J., LaTourette, S.) 2nd Hearing-Proponent
SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICERS
HB360 (Greenspan, D.) 2nd Hearing-Proponent
BULLYING

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Times-Journal: DeWine, NRA, partner Bring National School Shield Security Assessor Training to Southern Ohio

“Attorney General Mike DeWine announced a partnership with the NRA to bring their National School Shield Security Assessor Training program to schools in Ohio. The first training was held on Oct. 24 and 25th in Wellston. School personnel, school resource officers, and law enforcement officers representing more than 20 Ohio school districts committed to attend.”

 

FYI ARTS

Seeking High School Arts Advocates for Arts Day 2018

OCAThe Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation is offering a unique opportunity for high school students to participate in Ohio’s annual Arts Day and Governor’s Awards for the Arts in Ohio. Several Ohio high schools will be chosen to send a team of students to Columbus to serve as student advocates. The students will participate in a range of activities highlighting the importance of the arts and arts education. This is a valuable opportunity for the students to participate in the public policy process in a meaningful way.

Arts Day 2018 takes place on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 in Columbus. To apply, submit a brief statement expressing your school’s interest and what you hope to achieve by participating in the student advocates program. The statement must be submitted by December 15, 2017.

Program details

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

Scientific Thought in Motion

The Mansfield team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for teachers on Thursday, November 9. The free workshop will guide teachers through the translation of basic concepts in science into meaningful, self-assessing movement activities that put abstract ideas into tangible, visible form.

Location: Renaissance Theatre, Mansfield
Date: November 9, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Registration and program details

Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1b5630a4-43c0-4c81-baee-ad930f9b9173.pdf

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: ESC of Lorain County
Date: November 6, 2017
To register contact: http://www.esclc.org/

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update October 23, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

Senate Education Committee (Chair: Lehner)

The committee heard testimony on the following bill last week:

Sponsor testimony on Senate Bill (SB) 216: PUBLIC SCHOOL DEREGULATION ACT (HUFFMAN M) To enact the “Ohio Public School Deregulation Act” regarding the administration of preschool and primary and secondary education programs.

Committee Vice Chair Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima) delivered sponsor testimony on SB216, also known as the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act.  This bill would allow teachers to teach outside of their licensed certification in particular cases and remove the 30 hour annual professional development requirement for teaching gifted children.  It would also make changes to testing, teacher evaluations, staffing policies, reporting requirements and more.  Huffman said this bill, which was put together with the help of superintendents in Huffman’s district, would remove a variety of mandates and regulations on public schools that he said have become burdensome to many districts in the state.

“Providing a quality education to all Ohio children is a goal that we members of the General Assembly and our partners across the street share,” Huffman stated in written testimony. “But what we view as a smart idea on paper does not always translate into our school districts in practice.”  He said removing many of the mandates would restore control to the local districts that would help improve the efficiency of education.

Under section 3319.361 of proposed SB216, a superintendent of a city, local, or exempted village school district may employ a person licensed under section 3319.22 of the Revised Code to teach a subject area or grade level for which the person is not licensed.

SB216 could undermine the sound track record that Ohio school districts have made to hire highly qualified and licensed teachers in the arts.  According to OAAE data for the 2012-13 school year, there were approximately 9,000 arts teachers in Ohio’s traditional public schools.  Ninety-seven percent of these arts teachers were certified to teach courses in the arts, holding the appropriate multi-age license in an arts discipline. These teachers meet the graduation requirements of their institutions of higher education in their arts discipline, and also meet Ohio’s rigorous standards for beginning teachers, including passing a national assessment for teachers in their content area, and fulfilling all requirements for earning a permanent license.  Licensed, professional arts educators are essential to the structure of sound, standards-based arts education in schools. 

It is important to note that Ohio Revised Code already includes provisions for non-licensed individuals to teach.

Section 3319.301 Board to issue permits to qualified non-licensed individuals, requires the State Board to “issue permits to individuals who are not licensed as required by sections 3319.22 to 3319.30 of the Revised Code, but who are otherwise qualified, to teach classes for not more than a total of twelve hours a week, except that an individual teaching in a STEM school may teach classes for not more than a total of forty hours a week.”  The law also includes minimum requirements, such as “possession of a baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degree in, or significant experience related to, the subject the individual is to teach.” The non-licensed teacher also must work under the supervision of a licensed teacher.

Section 3302.151, relating to exemptions for “high performing schools,” was approved in Senate Bill 3 of the 131st General Assembly and expanded the practice of exempting school districts from the state’s teacher licensing standards.  The law exempts a “high performing school district”, which is defined in division (D) of the section, from the following:

  • Teacher qualification requirements under the third-grade reading guarantee
  • The mentoring component of the Ohio teacher residency program
  • Any provision of the Revised Code or rule or standard of the state board of education prescribing a minimum or maximum class size
  • Any provision of the Revised Code or rule or standard of the State Board requiring teachers to be licensed specifically in the grade level in which they are teaching, unless otherwise prescribed by federal law. This exemption does not apply to special education teachers, and teachers must still hold a valid Ohio license in the subject area in which the teacher is teaching, and at least some grade level determined appropriate by the district board.

This law also allows the superintendent of a high performing school district to “employ an individual who is not licensed as required by sections 3319.22 to 3319.30 of the Revised Code, but who is otherwise qualified based on experience, to teach classes in the district, so long as the board of education of the school district approves the individual’s employment and provides mentoring and professional development opportunities to that individual, as determined necessary by the board.” The individual must also pass a criminal records check.

Click here for a full analysis of SB216, including proposed changes to teacher evaluation and required professional development for providers of services to gifted students.

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

October Meeting Highlights

October 16 & 17 

Achievement and Graduation Requirements Committee

At the monthly State Board of Education meeting last week the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) staff presented graduation progress data to the Achievement and Graduation Requirements Committee.  ODE shared that the Class of 2018 has seen an improvement from a year ago with 76.8% of the students on track to graduate.  However, ODE cautioned against using this percentage as a projected graduation rate.  The full ODE presentation to the Committee can be viewed here. 

Columbus Dispatch: 3 of 4 high school seniors on track to meet Ohio graduation requirements

“About three-fourth of Ohio high school seniors are on track to earn a diploma in the spring, but more likely will graduate thanks to new, softer standards for the class of 2018.  An evaluation by the state Department of Education shows 77 percent of students in the class of 2018 either already met or are highly likely to meet graduation requirements passed by lawmakers a few years ago, according to data provided Tuesday to the state Board of Education.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s high school graduation “crisis” has eased – some

“The high school graduation “train wreck” that some have worried would hit this year’s senior class may not be as bad as predicted.  The Ohio Department of Education reports today that nearly 77 percent of high school seniors are “on-track” to earn a diploma in the spring by meeting the state’s higher test score requirements to graduate.”

AP / WSYX Channel 6: 3 in 4 Ohio seniors on track to graduate based on testing

“Education officials say roughly three-fourths of Ohio’s high school seniors have met or are considered highly likely to meet higher test score requirements for graduation this school year.  Educators had warned last year that a third or more of that class could be at risk of not meeting the test score requirements to graduate on time. The state subsequently added flexibility in how students can earn a diploma this year, through career training or other specified alternatives.”

 

Educators & Student Options Committee

The Educators & Student Options Committee received an update on the results of the Ohio Assessment for Educators program.  The committee opted not to recommend changes to the exams or the cut scores.  Matt DiBartolomeo, who works for test-maker Pearson and leads the OAE program, said results were similar to past years, when a majority of future teachers passed the exams that have been administered since 2013.  To be eligible for licensure, individuals must take and pass the tests that correspond with the grades and subjects they plan to teach.

 

Ohio Department of Education Strategic Plan

Discussion regarding the State Board of Education Strategic Plan continued during this month’s Board meeting.  A Vision Statement and four Guiding Domains were drafted to date.  The Guiding Domains are intended to help guide and measure goals to be met by a student’s completion of the twelfth grade.

The four guiding DOMAINS discussed by the Steering Committee:

  • Foundational Skills & Knowledge: literacy, numeracy & technology
  • Well-Rounded Content: social studies, sciences, languages, arts, coding, etc.
  • Critical Knowledge: thinking, problem solving, design thinking, creativity, information analytics
  • Social-Emotional: growth mindset, perseverance, self-awareness, team work, collaboration

The Strategic Planning Workgroups will continue to meet with the hope of wrapping up by December.  The full presentation can be viewed here.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, October 24

4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate Room 121

Senate Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB224 Ingram, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Allow schools to re-serve time-and temperature-controlled food

HB360 Greenspan, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony *PS

Enact Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act

HB176 Thompson, 3rd Hearing, Opponent Testimony

Address school assessments and curricula and teacher evaluations

 

Wednesday, October 25

11:00 a.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate Room 115

Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB66 Young, 4th Hearing, Interested Party Testimony

Require tenured faculty to teach minimum load

HB240 Barnes, 3rd Hearing, Opponent Testimony

Require state higher ed to adopt sex offense policies

HB363 Goodman/Brenner, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Enact Campus Free Speech Act

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: Bill seeks changes in testing, teacher evals, school mandates

“During a recent visit to the Botkins School District, Sen. Matt Huffman said teachers questioned him about why each was required to complete 30 hours of training for gifted students, even though many had none, or very few.  “It seemed obvious to a guy like me … Why doesn’t the superintendent decide who should have to get the gifted training and how to pay for it?” the Lima Republican said.”

 

WBNS: Ohio schools receive help from the state to combat bullying

“The state of Ohio is working across multiple agencies to lend schools a hand when it comes to approaching bullying.  For a long time, the issue was relatively unchartered territory but in 2015, the current K-12 school safety law went into effect here in Ohio and from there the Center for P20 Safety and Security was created.  P20 stands for preschool through the highest level of education, which is a doctorate.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Schools add “social, emotional” skills to reading, writing, arithmetic

“Jennifer Pelko sees more and more students in the Strongsville schools struggling with stress.  They struggle when relatives are sick or die. They struggle with bullying, both at school and online. Students and the adults around them struggle with drugs and alcohol.  ‘We focus so much on the academic side of things,’ said Pelko, that district’s assistant superintendent. ‘But a lot of our students have a lot of emotional issues and are ill-equipped to deal with them.'”

 

Columbus Dispatch: HS partnerships help community colleges grow enrollment

“Community college enrollment is up across Ohio this fall, according to preliminary data from public colleges and universities, likely because they’re providing affordable programs and partnerships and college credit for high school students. Approximately 164,800 students are enrolled at community colleges across the state, according to the data. That’s up nearly 1.8 percent from last year.”

 


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Finding Our Voice: An Arts and Education Summit Professional Development Day

GCAAEJoin the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Arts Education for this exciting event where we will “Find Our Voice”! The morning session includes a keynote address by Jeff Poulin, Arts Education Manager from Americans for the Arts, followed by a lively panel discussion to take a deeper dive into the importance of arts education from a local perspective.

The afternoon will provide a number of Professional Development sessions for teachers including topics such as:

• Arts Integration/STEM2STEAM
• Social/Emotional Learning with the Arts
• Moving beyond the THINK System
• New STEAM resources from Americans for the Arts
• Intro to the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative
• Emerging Careers in the Arts

The day promises to have opportunities for you to interact with colleagues and share ideas along the way.

Location: Cincinnati Art Museum
Date: November 7, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Cost: $20
Event registration: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/finding-our-voice-an-arts-and-education-summit-professional-development-day-registration-37735910123

Ohio Art Education Association emPOWERed: Art Up And Recharge
oaea_logocolor

Registration is open for the Ohio Art Education Association’s November conference! OAAE staff and board members will present several sessions during the conference. The event schedule is available online.

Location: SeaGate Convention Center
Date: November 2-4, 2017
Event Registration

Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.
Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

https://omeapdc.com/

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1b5630a4-43c0-4c81-baee-ad930f9b9173.pdf

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: ESC of Lorain County
Date: November 6, 2017
To register contact: http://www.esclc.org/

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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