Arts On Line Education Update June 26, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The Ohio Senate passed its version of the proposed FY18-19 biennial budget last week with an amendment approving alternate pathways to graduation for the Class of 2018.  The budget bill is now in the hands of the conference committee where the House and Senate will work out differences between their two versions of the bill.  The Legislative Services Commission (LSC) comparison document of both the House and Senate versions of the budget bill can be reviewed here.

 

Members of the conference committee include Reps. Scott Ryan (R-Newark), Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) and Jack Cera (D-Bellaire) and Sens. Scott Oelslager (R-North Canton), Gayle Manning (R-North Ridgeville) and Mike Skindell (D-Lakewood).  The conference committee is expected to report out the legislation this week, and then the bill will head to Governor Kasich for consideration.

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: $65.4 billion Ohio budget bill clears Senate: See where the money goes

“The Ohio Senate on Wednesday passed a $65.4 billion two-year state budget after making more than 150 changes to the bill passed by the House, setting the stage for a week of behind-the-scenes maneuvers and compromises between the two chambers. The Senate voted 24 to 8, largely along party lines, to approve the two-year budget.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: HS graduation requirements eased under Senate proposal

“The state Senate is looking to stave off a possible high school graduation “crisis” by allowing students to graduate even with poor scores on state tests.  The Senate Finance Committee included exemptions from test score requirements in its new version of the state budget bill today. Those must still pass the full Senate and also be accepted by the House, then gain approval from Gov. John Kasich, before becoming official.”

 

Dayton Daily News: Ohio Senate OK’s softer graduation rules for Class of 2018

“The Ohio Senate on Wednesday approved alternate pathways to graduation for Class of 2018 students who don’t pass state tests, as part of the state budget bill.  That sets up a conference committee debate in the coming week with members of the Ohio House, who did not include any such provision in their version of the budget.”

 

Associated Press: Ohio’s official budget gap exceeds $1B over 2 years

“Final estimates place Ohio’s projected budget shortfall at more than $1 billion.  Legislative budget analysts told the opening day of a conference committee working to meet a June 30 budget deadline that tax revenues are expected to lag projections by $1.02 billion over the two-year budget cycle.”

 

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

Passed by the Senate

HB124 Brenner/Carfagna

The legislation provides a fix for the Delaware Area Career Center levy that was placed on the ballot in only one of the counties in which the district has territory.  The bill now heads to the governor for his signature.

 

Passed by the House

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey

This bill creates academic standards in computer science and allows students to substitute computer science for a math or science course to fulfill graduation requirements.

 

House Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, reported out of committee

This bill requires schools to include instruction in cursive handwriting. 

HB166 & SB3

These bills would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system to better prepare Ohioans to enter in-demand jobs, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week. The bills were amended to allow for-profit teacher training programs to operate in Ohio.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

SB8 Gardner/Terhar, reported out of committee

This bill requires the School Facilities Commission to create a program to assist districts in purchasing technology, including improvements in security measures.

HB21 Hambley

A substitute version of HB21 was accepted and the LSC analysis of the changes can be viewed here. This bill outlines the process of verification for community school enrollments.

HB200 Koehler

This legislation would eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and instead create an income-based program available to students whose family income is at or below 400 percent of federal poverty guidelines.  The committee adopted a substitute measure to cap enrollment to 60 thousand students and return unused money back to the state.   The LSC analysis of the changes can be viewed here.

HB220 Leland

Sponsor testimony was given on HB220 which deals with the use of funds by community and nonpublic schools.  Rep. David Leland said this legislation “will improve charter school transparency and accountability by permitting the state auditor to track all taxpayer money received by private, for-profit schools.”

HB181 Hood/Brinkman

The committee accepted an amendment to the bill’s intention of addressing academic content standards and assessments.  Changes included prohibiting the use of Common Core State Standards, allowing parents to request their student not be retained if the third-grade reading guarantee wasn’t met and restores language requiring end-of-course examinations in American history and government, among others.

 

House Finance Committee

HB102 Brenner, Sponsor testimony

This bill would replace locally levied school district property taxes with a statewide property tax. Representative Andrew Brenner explained that with this piece of legislation “100% of the funding would follow the student, yet leaves local school districts intact.”   With his plan schools would be funded by one statewide property tax rate of 20 mills and dollars generated by an increase in the sales tax from 5.75% to 7.35%.

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Private School Vouchers: The Ohio Lesson

Innovation Ohio has released a detailed analysis of the current voucher system and its impact on students.  The group’s report details the history of the state’s voucher programs and highlights how much has been spent on the initiative.  Some of the findings include:

  • Vouchers now affect children in 83% of Ohio’s school districts
  • Local taxpayers subsidize vouchers with $105 million in locally raised money to make up for districts losing state funding to Ohio’s voucher programs
  • Students who take vouchers perform worse than their public school peers on state assessments
  • Some of the highest performing school districts in the state lose money and students to vouchers, turning the original intent of the program on its head

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Ohio Department of Education is seeking feedback on proposed changes to Ohio’s Learning Standards in science, social studies and financial literacy.  In addition, the survey asks for feedback on newly proposed high school anatomy and physiology standards.  ODE states that this survey is part of an overall effort to fine tune all of Ohio’s Learning Standards based on teachers’ experience with them during the past few years.  The survey will be available for response until July 18.

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: Lowering farmland values means homeowners will pay higher taxes

“A plan by legislative Republicans to give a tax break to farmers would mean higher property taxes for Ohio homeowners and less revenues for schools.   According to an analysis of proposed farmland value changes in the new two-year state budget, Ohio homeowners face more than $60 million in unvoted property tax increases, while schools could face a loss of $58 million in state and local tax revenue […]”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Sen. works to convince that Franklin Co. schools doing fine

“Most Franklin County districts fare worse under the Senate school-funding plan, compared to what the House passed in April as part of the two-year state budget.  But Sen. Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, sent a direct message to the three senators representing most of Franklin County: Things aren’t so bad.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: ECOT laying off staff so school can repay $60 million

“Facing the need to repay $60.4 million from the 2015-16 school year and potentially millions more from last school year, ECOT says it will lay off 350 workers within weeks, about a quarter of its workforce.”
Steubenville Herald-Star: Summer programs get big response

“The newly implemented summer feeding program at Indian Creek Schools has attracted a huge draw, which has surprised and delighted officials.  During Thursday’s regular school board session, Assistant Superintendent John Belt reported that more than 2,000 students had taken advantage of the Seamless Summer Option program within the first nine days.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

U.S. Department of Education Releases Task Form Progress Report & Seeks Public Comment on Regulatory Reform Initiatives

The US Department of Education released the first progress report of the Regulatory Reform Task Force last week.  The Task Force was created in response to the February presidential executive order requiring federal agencies to evaluate existing regulations for potential repeal, replacement or modification.  The Department is seeking public input concerning regulations and policy guidance that they recommend for change or removal.  In her statement, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos stated, “I look forward to the Task Force’s continued work and to hearing from the public as we work to prioritize the needs of students over unnecessary and burdensome requirements.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 19, 2017

OAAE Arts Online
Monday, June 19, 2017

 

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The Ohio Senate released its budget proposal last week as Substitute House Bill 49.  While addressing a state revenue shortfall of close to $1 billion, the proposal adds $154 million in FY18 and $117 million in FY19 for school funding.  However, in last week’s Senate Finance Committee hearing, Barbara Shaner of the Ohio Association of School Business Officials warned that significant cuts in student transportation still exists.  “This is the largest GRF cut in the entire budget and this is for a line item that was woefully underfunded to begin with,” she stated.

The substitute bill also contains many provisions including the elimination of the fourth and sixth grade social studies state assessment and the Resident Educator Program as well the removal of the provision permitting schools to use a paper format for state assessments.  A full Senate vote on SubHB49 is expected Wednesday, June 21, after which the bill will go to a conference committee of the House and Senate to work out the differences. 

The summary of Substitute HB49 can be reviewed here.

 

Associated Press: Senate budget closes $1B gap, adds $6M for opioid crisis

“Senate Republicans in Ohio said Monday that their version of the state budget closes a projected $1 billion gap while preserving essential services and pumping more money into fighting the opioid crisis.

Senate President Larry Obhof said the Senate was proud it “found a way to do more with less,” while acknowledging the causes of Ohio’s lagging revenues are still a bit of a mystery.” 

Cincinnati Enquirer: Would your school lose or gain money under Senate GOP plan?

“Fewer school districts would lose money under Senate Republicans’ plan compared with Gov. John Kasich’s initial proposal.  Of the 610 school districts in Ohio, 238 would gain money, 210 would receive the same amount and 162 would lose money over two years, compared with current 2017 funding. Under the Senate plan, schools statewide would receive 1 percent more each year.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Most Franklin County Districts See Less Money under Senate Budget

“Senate Republicans directed a little more money toward Ohio’s opioid crisis, and their first round of state budget changes left most Franklin County school districts with less money than the House-passed budget.  Anticipating a larger revenue shortfall when new estimates are released in two weeks, Senate leaders say the revised two-year budget that takes effect July 1 is crafted to close a projected $1 billion revenue gap — $200 million more than the hole Gov. John Kasich’s budget office suggested in April that lawmakers should close.”

Columbus Dispatch: GOP Drops Kasich-Requested Funds for Local Innovation

“Programs that Gov. John Kasich has advocated in recent years to spark innovation and shared services among communities and schools would die under the state Senate’s proposed budget changes.  Senate President Larry Obhof, R-Medina, said the changes proposed this week were not pain-free as Republicans crafted a two-year budget designed to cover a potential $1 billion shortfall in tax revenue.”

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

June 12 & 13

Proposed Assessment Structure Changes

State Superintendent, Paolo DeMaria, presented his recommendations for modifying Ohio’s Assessment Structure to the State Board of Education last week.  DeMaria’s recommendations are as follows:

  1. Eliminate the fourth grade social studies assessment
  2. Eliminate the English Language Arts I high school end-of-course assessment
  3. Eliminate the American Government high school end-of-course assessment
  4. Eliminate the requirement to have a nationally recognized jobs skills assessment component as part of the industry-recognized credential based diploma option (currently WorkKeys)

Changes in law would need to be made by the Ohio General Assembly to enact any assessment recommendations. 

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: No more art, music and gym tests just to grade teachers? How Ohio could change testing under new proposal

“Large amounts of standardized testing that Ohio’s students grind through each year would be cut if legislators allow a few changes proposed by State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria.  The largest change would come by adjusting Ohio’s teacher evaluations, which have forced districts to test students in subjects like art, music, gym, and elementary school science and social studies, just to see how much they learn under a teacher in a school year.”

Dayton Daily News: Change School Tests Again, Says Ohio State Superintendent

“Ohio schools Superintendent Paolo DeMaria recommended a reduction in student testing at both the state and school level Monday, but did not go as far as his advisory committee had suggested.

His specific proposals to change state testing, rolled out in a presentation to the state board of education, are not immediate, as they would require legislators to approve changes in Ohio law.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State superintendent proposes cuts in Ohio’s state tests

“State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria has recommended significant cuts in state-required testing of students, slashing mandated tests closer to just federal requirements. The recommendations, proposed to the state school board this morning, would end some tests that affect state graduation requirements and state report cards for schools and districts.”

 

Board Votes to Recover ECOT Funds

The Board voted 14-1 to accept a hearing officer’s report that concluded the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) had inflated attendance numbers and owed the state $60 million.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State school board votes to recover $60 million from ECOT online school

“The state school board voted today to order the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), Ohio’s largest charter school, to repay $60 million to the state.  The 14-1 vote comes nine months after an attendance review by the Ohio Department of Education found that the school was paid for 9,000 more students last school year than the school could document.”

Columbus Dispatch: ECOT ordered to repay $60 million for inflating attendance

“Republicans and Democrats, school-choice proponents and opponents, appointees of Gov. John Kasich and those elected independently agreed Monday: Online school giant ECOT must repay $60 million in state aid for grossly inflating its attendance figures.”

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT

SB151 (Senator Site) and companion bill HB242 (Representative Carfagna): to permit SERS to grant reduced cost-of-living adjustments

 

Senate Insurance and Financial Institutions Committee Chair: Hottinger

Senator Sites gave sponsor testimony on a bill that would allow the School Employees Retirement System (SERS) to grant reduced cost-of-living adjustments.  Sites testified that with this piece of legislation the “pension fund will be in a much better position to withstand another market downturn like that of 2008, protecting the long-term health of the System”.

 

House Aging and Long Term Care Committee Chair: Arndt

The House Aging and Long Term Care Committee heard opponent testimony on the companion bill of SB151, HB242.   Service Employees International Union (SEIU) president Becky Williams testified that because members in the SERS pension fund are the lowest-paid of the five public pensions, averaging about $24,000 per year, they depend on the annual cost of living increase to survive.  “A cost-of-living adjustment freeze for retirees authorized by the SERS Board could mean having to choose between food on the table, refilling a prescription or keeping the lights on for our retirees”, Williams wrote in her testimony.

  

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio’s public-employee pensions face cutbacks

“Collectively, Ohio’s five public pension funds have $192 billion in assets and last year paid out more than $15 billion in pension benefits and $1.1 billion in health-care benefits. They are not required by law to provide health insurance, but all five do. Whether they will in the future is uncertain.”

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, June 20

3:00 p.m., Room 121

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB220 Leland, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Regards use of funds by community and nonpublic schools

 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program

 

HB154 Smith, R./Manning, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid Program

 

HB235 Gavarone, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Regards procedures under Every Student Succeeds Act

 

HB200 Koehler, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB21 Hambley, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Verify community school enrollments

 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Address academic content standards and assessments

 

Wednesday, June 21

11:00 a.m., Room 115

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Require instruction in cursive handwriting

 

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Revise workforce development laws

 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

HB240 Barnes, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Require state higher ed to adopt sex offense policies

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Brookings: How Is Policy Affecting Classroom Instruction?

“This paper uses new state-representative teacher survey data to characterize the degree of standards implementation across three states—Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas. It investigates teachers’ perceptions of the extent to which the policy environment supports them to implement the standards. A great deal of variation in perceptions of policy was found, with Ohio teachers perceiving policy to be less supportive than Kentucky or Texas teachers.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

US News & World Report: Education Budget Hearing Exposes Chasm between GOP and Trump

“When Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos testified before a Senate appropriations subcommittee Tuesday regarding the president’s budget proposal, her remarks that private schools must follow federal law if they receive federal funding received the lion’s share of attention.  But the hearing, during which nearly every GOP members criticized aspects of the spending plan, also exposed just how far apart the Trump administration’s education agenda is with that of Republicans in Congress, perhaps foreshadowing how likely – or not – the White House is to achieve any of its policy priorities.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 12, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

Details on the Senate’s version of HB49, the FY 18-19 budget bill, are to be released today, June 12, during an 11:00 a.m. news conference streamed on the Ohio Channel.  The substitute bill will then be the focus of this afternoon’s Senate Finance Committee session at 2:30 p.m. and is tentatively scheduled to go before the full Senate for a vote the week of June 19.    

Public testimony on the Senate’s substitute bill is scheduled for Tuesday, June 13 (11:00 a.m.), Wednesday, June 14 (10:30 a.m.) and Thursday, June 15 (1:00 p.m. or after session). Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing, oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

Columbus Dispatch: State tax take continues to fall, complicating Ohio budget outlook

“State tax collections continued to fall short of expectations in May, raising the specter that lawmakers may have to patch a bigger-than-anticipated hole as they craft the new two-year budget.  The Senate already needed to come up with more money and cuts to account for a shortfall estimated to be at least $800 million — about $170 million more than House-passed reductions. Tuesday’s numbers do not make its work any easier.”

 

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT (ESSA)

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (OAAE) Recommendations for Revised ESSA Plan for Ohio

The OAAE and several other statewide stakeholder organizations believe that there are many opportunities for Ohio’s ESSA Plan to directly support arts education programs and a well-rounded education for Ohio’s students.  After providing recommendations about the February 2, 2017 draft consolidated plan, we had hoped that there would be more emphasis on a well-rounded education, including the arts, in the revised consolidated plan.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) approved in 1965 was part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty” and above all, represented a commitment to support equal access to quality educational programs and a well-rounded curriculum for all children.  ESSA supports efforts to achieve this goal by providing states and local educational agency (LEAs) with federal leadership, resources, and policy support to make it possible for students to achieve more than standards in reading, math, and science.

Ohio’s February 2017 draft ESSA plan addressed support for a well-rounded education in Section 6:  Well-Rounded and Supportive Education for Students, on page 93, stating that Ohio will ensure that students have access to a well-rounded education through implementation of Ohio’s Learning Standards and model curriculumWhile the March 2017 revisions to the federal template for state plans eliminated the requirement that State Education Agencies describe strategies to support LEAs in providing “equitable access to a well-rounded education,” there are still requirements in the federal law that support student access to a well-rounded education, which could be emphasized in Ohio’s revised consolidated plan to guide and support districts and schools.

The OAAE has made specific recommendations to strengthen support for a well-rounded education in latest draft of Ohio’s consolidated plan for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act.   Read the recommendations in our June 11, 2017 letter to the State Board of Education.

In response to stakeholder concern following the release of Ohio’s draft ESSA plan in February 2017, the Ohio Department of Education decided to hold off submitting a final plan to the federal government until September, allowing time for further review of stakeholder input. A revised timeline called for the State Board of Education to approve a final plan at their July meeting, and send it to Governor Kasich for comment by August 18. Ohio must submit its plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act to the US Department of Education by September 18, 2017.

 

NEW REPORT – Education Commission of the States 

ESSA: Mapping opportunities for the arts This special report highlights the ways states and districts can engage the arts in the ongoing work of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

 

EdWeek Market Brief:  Inside ESSA: What It Means for Arts Studies

“There’s been a lot written about the new flexibility afforded states and districts under the Every Student Succeeds Act. A new report suggests that added leeway may pay dividends for arts education, and it offers a de-facto guide to the sections of the federal statute that may benefit that area of the curriculum.  Arts education is an area that supporters say tends to get kicked around and neglected when budgets are tight, and when schools are focused on improving scores on high-stakes tests in core academic areas.”

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee Chair: Duffey

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB58 Brenner/Slaby 4th Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

Cursive handwriting was removed from state learning standards in 2010 when Common Core was introduced. This bill would add it back into the standards starting with the 2018-19 school year.  Opponents voiced concern that such mandates from the state are unnecessary.  In written testimony, the Ohio School Boards Association, Buckeye Association of School Administrators and Ohio Association of School Business Officials wrote “we oppose state and federal mandates that require school districts to devote limited resources and time to such requirements. As such, we cannot support HB58.”

HB166 Reineke/Cupp & SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

These bills would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system to better prepare Ohioans to enter in-demand jobs, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB200 Koehler, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Both proponent and opponent testimony was given on HB200.  This bill would eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and instead create an income-based program available to students whose family income is at or below 400 percent of federal poverty guidelines.  Opposition testimony was presented by Scott DiMauro, Vice President of the Ohio Education Association (OEA).  DiMauro voiced concern on the expansion of voucher programs indicating it would “drain needed resources from the approximately 90% of students who attend Ohio’s local public schools”.  

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, Passed out of committee

This bill would allow students to substitute computer science courses for Algebra II in districts that have adopted the permissive standards, require educator qualifications regarding computer science, and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year that includes e-schools.

HB325 Gavarone, Sponsor testimony

The goal of this legislation is to ensure the General Assembly has input in the state’s final education plan for the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

Sub SB8 Gardner/Terhar, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

As with its companion measure, HB37, this legislation requires the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, June 12

8:00 a.m., Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Tuesday, June 13

8:00 a.m., Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

 

11:00 a.m., Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 7th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

1:00 p.m., Room 121

House Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB235 Gavarone, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Regards procedures under Every Student Succeeds Act 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program 

HB200 Koehler, 4th Hearing, Interested Party Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Address academic content standards and assessments

 

Wednesday, June 14

10:30 a.m., Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 8th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

Thursday, June 15

1:30 p.m., (or after session), Senate Finance Hearing Room

Senate Finance Committee Chair: Oelslager

HB49 Smith, R., 9th Hearing, Interested Party

Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

 

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Dayton Daily News: School employees protest proposed benefit cuts today at statehouse

“School bus drivers, grounds keepers, secretaries and other retirees marched on the Ohio Statehouse on Wednesday, loudly protesting planned cuts to their public pensions.  A few hundred protesters organized by the Ohio Association of Public School Employees voiced opposition to pending bills that call for cuts to the cost of living adjustment given to retirees in the School Employees Retirement System. Pension officials say the changes are needed to shore up the system finances.”

 

Akron Beacon Journal: Concerned Akron council asks Trump, Congress and state legislators to have a little heart

“Akron City Council spent part of its legislative session Monday asking state and federal authorities to reconsider their own legislation.  In three separate resolutions, council asked President Donald Trump and Congress to go back to the drawing board on a federal budget proposal that threatens “the most vulnerable among us,” opposed the United States’ recent withdrawal from the Paris Agreement on Climate Control, and asked Ohio Gov. John Kasich not to force local parks to participate in oil and gas drilling operations.”


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update June 5, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE BIENNIAL BUDGET (HB49)

The state of Ohio revenue results for the month of May are expected soon and many fear the Senate will have a larger budget shortfall than the anticipated $800 million.  The Senate is working to pass HB49, the state’s biennial budget, by the deadline of June 30.  

Toledo Blade: Senate Democrats seek public’s help on Ohio budget

“Lacking the votes to go it alone, Ohio Senate Democrats on Thursday held a forum hoping to enlist the public’s help in their uphill battle to influence the state’s next two-year budget.  Democrats plan to offer numerous amendments on such things as bolstering the fight against the state’s escalating addiction epidemic, removing a House amendment blocking Toledo from enforcing its new lead law, and increasing funding for schools and local governments.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Senate Eyes Changes to Medicaid, School Funding

“Among its budget changes, the Ohio Senate is not expected to force the Kasich administration to ask permission before spending any money on Medicaid expansion, and is looking to reduce the number of schools facing funding cuts.  About 350 districts face state funding reductions under the House-passed budget. Senate President Larry Obhof, R-Medina, said a few weeks ago he hoped to ensure none of them faced cuts. He did not go that far today.”

 

Senate Finance Committee

The Senate Finance Committee heard reports from each Senate Finance Subcommittee chair as well as continued to hear testimony on HB49. Primary and Secondary Education Finance Subcommittee Chair Sen. Cliff Hite (R-Findlay) testified that 121 witnesses appeared before the subcommittee with the majority voicing concern on the impact of the proposed budget for their school district.   A substitute bill is expected during the week of June 12.

Public testimony continues this week with two days left, Tuesday, June 6 (11:00 a.m.) and Wednesday, June 7 (11:00 a.m.).  Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing; oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

 

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

The committee heard testimony on the following: 

HB176 Thompson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Nearly 15 people testified in favor of HB176 which would reduce the number of exams, eliminate state teacher and principal evaluation systems, and allow individual school districts to set learning standards.

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 4th Hearing, All Testimony

Written testimony was submitted on HB170 which would develop optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science, revise educator qualifications regarding computer science as well as create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.  

HB154 Smith/Manning, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

This legislation would establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid program which would provide grants and loans to cover the cost of short-term programs leading to commercial driver’s licenses.

HB200 Koehler, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

The aim of this legislation is to eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB203 Sponsor testimony from Rep. John Barnes (D-Cleveland)

This bill would establish a youth summer jobs ‘pledging initiative’ to increase access to summer employment opportunities for high school and college youth in Ohio.

HB217 Sponsor testimony from Rep. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell) 

This bill will prohibit institutions of higher education from requiring prospective students to disclose disciplinary actions on their applications for admission.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, June 6

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 5th Hearing, All Testimony

Address computer science curriculum 

SubSB8 Gardner/Terhar, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Establish 1:1 School Facilities Option Program 

HB200 Koehler, 3rd Hearing, All Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

Wednesday, June 7

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB58 Brenner/Slaby, 4th Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

Require instruction in cursive handwriting 

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Revise workforce development laws 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

 

Chillicothe Gazette: City Schools Adjusting STEAM Plans

“More students will have access to the new Chillicothe City Schools’ Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Innovation Academy during the next school year than originally thought.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Kids’ Learning Doesn’t Have to Slide over Summer

“Summer is a time to try things that can’t happen in a classroom, and even better, warding off academic atrophy doesn’t have to cost much, if anything.”

 

AP/Columbus Dispatch: Ohio School District Fights High Chronic Absenteeism Rate

“An Ohio school district is fighting chronic absenteeism rates that see nearly one in four students missing multiple days of school a year. About 24 percent of students in Lorain city schools in northern Ohio are chronically absent, meaning students miss about 18 days a year.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: ACT Official Won’t Explain Ohio Students’ Test Snafu Due to “Security” 

“Hundreds of students in Reynoldsburg and several other Ohio school districts had their ACT scores invalidated, but state officials are urging the college-entrance-testing company to reconsider.”

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT  (ESSA)

 

ODE: Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Draft Sections of Template

As draft sections of the Ohio ESSA plan are presented to the State Board for discussion, they will be posted to the ESSA page of the ODE website.  ODE is still welcoming comments on the drafts and can be submitted to essa@education.ohio.gov.  Final revisions of the Ohio ESSA plan will be presented to the State Board at its meeting July 10 and 11, 2017.

 

ODE: Remediation-Free Scores for “New” SAT Set

“Students who took College Board’s SAT after March 1, 2016, may use their scores to meet the college and career readiness pathway to graduation. A remediation-free score on the ACT or SAT is one option students may use to meet the test requirement for graduation. In March 2016, College Board administered a new SAT that uses a different test format, scoring model and score reports.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

President Trump recently released his full budget for FY 2018 which calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education.

AP: Trump Budget Cuts Aimed at Safety-Net Programs Worries Advocates for Minority Communities

“It would defund and cut at least 10 percent of key civil rights enforcement positions across the government, including positions at the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Legal Services Corporation, which helped more than 2 million low-income individuals with legal representation last year, advocates said.”

 

NPR: Why It’s So Hard to Know Whether School Choice Is Working

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been a passionate proponent of expanding school choice, including private school vouchers and charter schools, and she has the clear backing of President Trump. But does the research justify her enthusiasm?  Experts say one single, overarching issue bedevils their efforts to study the impact of school choice programs. That is: It’s hard to disentangle the performance of a school from the selection of its students.”

 

USDOE: USDOE Launches New IDEA Website

“The U.S. Department of Education recently launched a new website dedicated to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).  Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos directed the Department to expedite the development of a new, updated and more robust site specific to the IDEA after the Department’s Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004 (Legacy) site experienced a prolonged outage in February due to technical issues.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update May 30, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

 

In anticipation of the full Senate chamber vote at the end of June, the Senate Finance Committee released its final hearing schedule for the state’s FY 18-19 budget bill, HB49. The budget must be finalized by Friday, June 30.

 

  • Subcommittee reports: Tuesday, May 30 (2:30 p.m.)

 

  • Public Testimony:
    • Wednesday, May 31 (2:30 p.m.)
    • Thursday, June 1 (11:00 a.m.)
    • Tuesday, June 6 (11:00 a.m.)
    • Wednesday, June 7 (11:00 a.m.)

 

Witnesses are asked to submit their testimony and completed witness slips to Erica.vincent@ohiosenate.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing. Oral testimony will be limited to three minutes.

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Higher Education

On the subcommittee’s last day of testimony for HB49 David Meuse, representing Ohio Citizens for the Arts, was one of many interested parties who testified.  Meuse, the past chairman of the board for The Columbus Foundation and the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA,) discussed how arts funding generates economic benefits and how the arts strengthen education.  He shared that “We know this from a recent research study conducted by the Center for Regional Development at Bowling Green State University, which shows that the creative industries support nearly 231,000 jobs and contribute almost $32 billion to the state’s economy.”

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

The subcommittee heard testimony from nearly 60 different interested parties regarding HB49 over a two day period.  Among those testifying was a group of teachers voicing their support of language to eliminate the Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA) program. The teachers said that while the program was well-meaning, it took too much time away from their students and required excessive paperwork and preparation.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Headed to the Governor for Signature

SB9: This legislation establishes a tax holiday for August 4 – 6.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio lawmakers approve 2017 August sales tax holiday

“Ohio consumers will again get a back-to-school sales tax break on clothing, school supplies and instructional materials in August.”

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB181:– Sponsor testimony from Reps. Ron Hood (R-Ashville) and Thomas E. Brinkman Jr. (R-Mt. Lookout).  This bill would eliminate Ohio learning standards and related tests as well as teacher and principal evaluations.

HB37: The committee accepted a substitute version.  The Legislative Services Commission (LSC) analysis can be viewed here.  This legislation would require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

HB170: Proponent testimony and a substitute bill was accepted. This bill calls for developing optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science. It also would address educator qualifications for computer science and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.  The LSC analysis on the change can be viewed here.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation

 

HB225: Education Plan (Gavarone, T.)
Regarding procedures for approval or disapproval of the state education plan for the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.
HB242: Retirement Benefits (Carfagna, R.)
Regarding School Employees Retirement System annual cost-of-living adjustments.
HB246: Classroom Facilities (Boccieri, J., Rezabek, J.)
To require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to provide funding to certain county boards of developmental disabilities to assist in the acquisition of classroom facilities.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Wednesday, May 31

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development Chair: Duffey

HB203 Barnes, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Increase access to youth summer job opportunities

 

HB217 Brenner, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Prohibit college applications asking about disciplinary actions

 

1:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 4th Hearing, All Testimony

Address Computer Science Curriculum

 

HB176 Thompson, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Address school assessments and curricula and teacher evaluations

 

HB200 Koehler, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB154 Smith/Manning, 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Establish Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid Program

 

HB220 Leland, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Regards use of funds by community and non-public schools

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 

ODE: Spread the word: Kids eat free this summer!

“Again this summer, the Summer Food Service Program is providing children with free, healthy meals, and we need your help spreading the word to families and students. It’s easy to participate and no sign up is required. Simply call (866) 3-HUNGRY, visit education.ohio.gov/KidsEat or download the free Ohio Department of Education mobile app for iPhone and Android and check back regularly to find meal times and locations.”

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio schools might regain paper option for standardized tests

“After one year of requiring students to take their state standardized tests on a computer, Ohio’s legislators could give the state’s schools the choice to go back to paper and pencil.  The version of the state budget that the House passed on May 2 says that schools may administer the tests on paper, online or by using a combination of the two. The budget still must go through the Senate and to Gov. John Kasich for approval by June 30.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: State auditor urges steep cuts in Delaware schools

“The state auditor has sent a troubling forecast to the Delaware school district, urging it to cut jobs and extracurricular programs and overhaul its health-care benefits.  And even after that, the district would face more than a $1 million deficit without new revenue.  The district could cut nearly $4.6 million from its $54 million budget, based on a performance audit released Thursday by Auditor Dave Yost.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Don’t penalize us for failing schools, charter overseers say, if management is good

“Failing grades at charter schools shouldn’t bring automatic penalties, Ohio’s charter oversight organizations say, so long as schools have good oversight otherwise.  Leaders of Ohio’s nationally-ridiculed charter school community continued a campaign to limit repercussions for the lagging academic performance of charters before a state Senate sub-committee last week.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: Budget cuts bleed schools

“Twenty years after the Ohio Supreme Court found that Ohio’s school funding was inadequate — violating the state constitutional mandate to provide a “thorough and efficient” education — lawmakers might make things even worse.  There is fear of the Senate chopping or even zeroing out an anticipated increase in the so-called “funding cap.” That’s an arbitrary limit the state sets on how much a district’s total state funding can grow, regardless of how many additional students it is serving.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Editorial: Open the shades on charter spending

“No function of state government is more important than its constitutional obligation to “secure a thorough and efficient system of common schools throughout the state.” Education is the bedrock of democracy. That is why the Ohio Constitution, since 1851, has obligated the state to provide an education to each of its citizens.  How thoroughly and how efficiently the state fulfills this mandate should concern every Ohioan, every year, every generation.”

 

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

President Trump released his full budget last week for FY2018.  While the final version will likely look much different once it makes its way through Congress, Trump’s proposal calls for an increase in spending for school choice and school vouchers with a reduction in funds for special education grants and teacher development.  Overall, the budget outlines a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education.

 

Time Magazine: Donald Trump’s 2018 Budget Slashes Education Department Funding by 13.5%

“Education advocates say President Donald Trump’s budget contradicts his campaign pledge to make college more affordable with its proposed elimination of subsidized student loans and cuts in other programs that help students pay tuition.  The 2018 budget, unveiled Tuesday, slashes funding for the Education Department by 13.5 percent.”

 

Washington Post: DeVos Promises ‘the Most Ambitious Expansion of Education Choice in Our Nation’s History’ – But Offers No Details

“Education Secretary Betsy DeVos promised Monday evening that President Trump would propose “the most ambitious expansion of education choice in our nation’s history,” but she offered no details about the administration’s plans.  Speaking in Indianapolis before a friendly audience of school voucher proponents, she instead laid out a moral case to dramatically transform American education — and improve young people’s prospects — by expanding school choice.”

 

CNN: Trump’s budget by the numbers: What gets cut and why

“President Donald Trump’s team released its first full budget proposal on Tuesday, and while lawmakers are likely to dismiss most of it — as they traditionally do with most White House wish lists — the document provides fresh insight into the administration’s priorities.  While the overall proposed spending is about on par with last year, at $4.1 trillion for 2018, the budget is notable for the knife it takes to domestic programs focused on science and research, the arts and, most notably, social welfare programs.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: New Trump budget zeroes out Great Lakes Restoration: See what it means for Ohio

“From eliminating the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to cutting food stamps, the budget proposal that President Donald Trump unveiled on Tuesday contains something to upset nearly everyone.”

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

 

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Arts On Line Education Update May 22, 2017

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

 

Passed by the Senate

SB8 passed the Senate unanimously last week.  This bill requires the School Facilities Commission to create a program to assist districts in purchasing technology, including improvements in security measures. The day before, the Senate Education committee adopted a substitute bill for SB8 to ensure joint vocational school districts would have access to assistance in purchasing technology, as well expand the scope of the program to allow a broader range of school projects to be considered.

 

Passed by the House

The House passed HB124 by a vote of 89-2.  The legislation provides a fix for the Delaware Area Career Center levy that was placed on the ballot in only one of the counties in which the district has territory.  The joint vocational school district may now submit the question of a tax levy renewal to voters in the other counties who did not have an opportunity to vote on the levy in November of 2015.

 

House Government & Accountability Oversight Committee

The committee heard proponent testimony on HB87 which calls for funds from community schools to be returned to the state as a result of an audit finding against the community school.  Mark H. Curtis, president of the Twinsburg City Schools Board of Education testified that “Our district only receives $1,280.95 in foundation funding per student. However, approximately $6,583.97 is deducted for each student attending a charter school. This disparity places our district in a position of having to raise additional tax dollars to make up for those lost to charter schools.”

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following:

HB170 – Proponent testimony on HB170. This bill calls for developing optional academic content standards and curriculum for computer science. It also would address educator qualifications for computer science and create a competitive technology grant program for the 2018-2019 school year.

 

HB176 – Sponsor testimony from Rep. Andy Thompson (R-Marietta).  This legislation would make changes to school assessments and curricula as well as teacher evaluations.

 

HB200 – Sponsor testimony from Rep. J. Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield). This legislation is identical to SB85, and eliminates the EdChoice Scholarship Program and the Cleveland Scholarship Program to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

House State and Local Government Committee

HB134 – Passed out of committee.   The bill was amended to narrow the focus to only Medina County and allows the school district to spend county improvement board grant funds on permanent improvements outside of the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

 

 

Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee

The committee heard sponsor testimony on SB3 from Sen. Bill Beagle.   The legislation would revise the laws governing the state’s workforce development system, programs that may be offered by primary and secondary schools, certificates of qualification for employment, and the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Agency, as well as designate the first week of May as In-Demand Jobs Week.

 

Senate Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

The subcommittee continued to hear testimony from concerned districts and on the potential negative impact the state’s budget bill, HB49, may have on their schools.

 

Newly Introduced Legislation:

HB233 FIREARMS (Rep. Becker) To enact the “Decriminalization Effort For Ending Notorious Deaths (DEFEND)” to provide an opportunity for a concealed handgun licensee or qualified military member to avoid guilt for carrying a concealed handgun into a prohibited place if the person leaves upon request, and to penalize as disorderly conduct failing to leave upon request or returning with a firearm. 

  • Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio bill would decriminalize carrying concealed handguns in schools, other gun-free zones “Concealed handgun permit holders caught carrying on school grounds and other gun-free sites would no longer be subject to prison time under a bill introduced in the Ohio House.  Rep. John Becker, a Clermont County Republican, sponsored a bill decriminalizing the violation. Under House Bill 233, a concealed handgun license holder, with a concealed firearm, discovered in a gun-free zone must leave upon request.”

 

HB217 COLLEGE APPLICATIONS-DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS (Rep. Andrew Brenner) To prohibit institutions of higher education from requiring students to disclose disciplinary actions on their applications for admission

 

HB220 NONPUBLIC SCHOOL FUNDS (Rep. David Leland) With regard to the use of funds by community schools and nonpublic schools

 

HB224 RE-SERVING SCHOOL LUNCH ITEMS (Rep. Catherine Ingram) To permit districts and schools to re-serve time- and temperature-controlled food items to students if items are unused and returned unopened, undamaged, and in the original packaging

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, May 23

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Chair: Brenner

HB37 Arndt, Improve school safety and technology infrastructure

2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

 

HB181 Hood/Brinkman, Address academic content standards and assessments

1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

 

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, Address computer science curriculum

3rd Hearing, All Testimony

 

Wednesday, May 24

2:30 p.m. (or after session), North Hearing Room

Finance -Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, Chair: Hite

HB49 Smith, R., Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

8th Hearing, All Testimony

 

Thursday, May 25

10:00 a.m., North Hearing Room

Finance -Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, Chair: Hite

HB49 Smith, R., Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

9th Hearing, All Testimony

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 

ODE: Seeking districts to participate in truancy pilot program

“As part of House Bill 410, the Ohio Family and Children First Cabinet Council is seeking districts who are interested in taking part in a pilot program addressing truancy. Each school district will develop a multidisciplinary truancy team for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 school years that addresses attendance barriers for each child referred to the team.”

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

Columbus Dispatch: The Daily Briefing: Senate looking beyond $800 million budget hole

“Senate President Larry Obhof said his chamber has the $800 million hole in mind as it crafts the new two-year budget, but members are anticipating that figure could go higher when new, official tax revenue estimates come in June.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Akron to create arts-focused high school programs with KSU

“Kent State University and the Akron Public Schools will create a College and Career Academy in the district’s 10 high schools that focuses on fashion, arts, architecture and design.  The partnership was announced Tuesday at a ceremony naming the district as a Ford Next Generation Learning community.”

 

Columbus Dispatch: Nonprofit exposes middle-schoolers to music making process

“No sooner had Columbus-area musician Nick D’Andrea asked five middle-schoolers to jot down better descriptions and metaphors for feeling hurt than Saba Bekuretsion and Hannah Moody penned these lyrics.  The words were exactly what D’Andrea was looking for from the students at Berwick Alternative K-8 School in Columbus City Schools.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Chronic absenteeism a growing concern in Ohio schools

“If your child misses school for a doctor’s appointment, it’s no big deal, right?  Miss another when family visits from out of town? It happens.  Just have a crazy morning and miss the bus? No big deal. She’ll make it tomorrow.  But it all adds up more than parents realize.”

 

Youngstown Vindicator: ODOT plow gets eye-popping paint, thanks to students

“When Mahoning County drivers are battling snowstorms next winter, the plow on one particular Ohio Department of Transportation truck may pop out at them.  A group of Canfield art students spent the last two weeks decorating a plow with a painting inspired by renowned pop artist Roy Lichtenstein.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

 

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos Announces All Spring State ESSA Plan Submissions Complete, Ready for Peer Review

“Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced that all state plans submitted for the spring deadline by 16 states and the District of Columbia under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) were found to be complete and ready for peer review.”

 

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

 

OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017

The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO: The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

 

 

Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education – November 7

Save the date November 7 for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education’s Professional Development Day.  More details will be released in a couple months, for additional information please email info@cincyartsalliance.org.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update May 15, 2017

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

Arts On Line Research Consultant, Joan Platz, has written a thorough summary of HB49 as passed by the House of Representatives May 2, 2017.  This analysis covers the bill in its entirety and shows how education and the arts fit into the picture.  The summary can be reviewed here.

 

With the budget bill now in the hands of the Senate, the Higher Education Subcommittee heard testimony from several agencies on the impact of the proposed funding levels.  Ohio Arts Council (OAC) Executive Director Donna Collins was one of many testifying on behalf of their organization last week.  Ms. Collins stressed the success OAC has had with their educational art programs as well as with administering grants to various organizations throughout the state.  With only 16 on staff, the OAC costs the state a modest amount which as Ms. Collins reported “totals less than 0.04% of the state’s total GRF appropriations, but produces a big return on investment.”  She continued to say, “In the last grant cycle, every OAC dollar was matched with local and private funds at a tremendous ratio of 56:1.”

 

The Senate Finance Committee on Primary and Secondary Education heard from concerned school districts that felt more change was needed to the school funding formula, particularly districts losing Tangible Personal Property tax dollars.  Although the House softened the blow with their final version of HB49, districts who rely heavily on property taxes say they will never be able to make up that loss of funds when the TPP is finally phased out.  Members of the Coalition for Fiscal Fairness for Ohio presented a plan that would help districts in this situation by ensuring they receive the same funding as in Fiscal Year 2015.

 

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

May 8 & 9

 

ESSA STATUS UPDATE

During last week’s State Board meeting, the Board’s standing committees each reviewed their assigned portion of Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan.  The committees will review the remainder of ESSA plan at the June meeting with the intent of the full Board approving the plan at the July meeting.  The plan would then be sent to Governor Kasich by August 18 to give him a full 30 days of review before the final Ohio ESSA plan would be officially submitted by the September 18 deadline.

 

The State Board Committees have been assigned the following sections for their review:

 

Accountability & Continuous Improvement Committee

May Meeting: 21st Century (section G) & Homeless Children (I)

June Meeting: Accountability/Improvement (A4) & Appendix A

 

Achievement & Graduation Requirements Committee

May Meeting: School Conditions (A6) / School Transitions (A7) / English Language Learners (E)

June Meeting: Eighth Grade Math Exception (A2) / Native Language Assessments (A3) / Rural and Low Income Schools (H)

 

Educators & Student Options Committee

May Meeting: Access to Educators (A5)

June Meeting: Effective Instruction (D)

 

Executive Committee

May Meeting: Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk (C)

June Meeting: Migratory Children (B) / Student Support/Enrichment Grants (F)

 

MODEL TRUANCY POLICY

The Board’s Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee voted to adopt a model policy on student truancy and absenteeism as required by House Bill 410.  HB410 was passed in December 2016 to encourage and support a preventative approach to excessive absences and truancy.  The model policy, as well as the release form to allow school officials to access data protected under the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), are set to be voted on by the entire Board during the June meeting.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

 

Newly Introduced Legislation:

HB203 SUMMER JOBS (Barnes, J.)

To require the Director of Development Services to establish a youth summer jobs pledging initiative to increase access to summer employment opportunities for high school and college youth.

 

HB200 SCHOOL CHOICE (Koehler, K.)

To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

Proponent testimony was given on HB47, the bill to ensure students serving in uniformed services are able to participate in extracurricular school activities.  The committee also heard HB170 sponsor testimony from Reps. Rick Carfagna (R-Genoa Township) and Mike Duffey (R-Worthington) as well as proponent testimony.  This bill addresses academic content standards and curriculum requirements for computer science as well as revises educator qualifications for computer science.

 

House State and Local Government Committee

The committee heard testimony on HB134, the bill to allow a school district to use community improvements board grants for permanent improvements outside the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

 

OHIO STATEHOUSE

Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC)

JEOC Executive Director, Lauren Monowar-Jones, presented the JEOC research agenda to the committee on Thursday, May 11.  One area of the research is commercially used assessments administered in Ohio schools.  Monowar-Jones hopes to determine which assessments each school district is using, the duration of the testing and if it is more than the law requires, as well as the sense of usage for the assessment.  The JEOC also plans to study the access students have to career technical education.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, May 16

11:00 a.m., Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development, Chair: Duffey

HB166 Reineke/Cupp, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Revise workforce development laws

 

SubSB3 Beagle/Balderson, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Review workforce development laws

 

4:00 p.m., Room 121

Education and Career Readiness  Chair: Brenner  

HB170 Carfagna/Duffey, 2nd Hearing, All Testimony

Address computer science curriculum

 

HB200 Koehler, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

 

HB176 Thompson, 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony

Address school assessments and curricula and teacher evaluations

 

NEWS AROUND OHIO

 

StateImpact Ohio: Charter School Loophole Will Be Fixed in State Senate

“Dayton area Republican State Senator Peggy Lehner, says she’s ready to fix a provision allowing a failing school to continue operating by changing sponsors, who wouldn’t be punished for the schools performance. Because the state’s Legislative Services Committee drafted the amendment, the problem is fixable, Lehner says.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Supreme Court rules search that found bullets was constitutional

“The search of a high school student’s backpack that authorities say led to the discovery of bullets and later a gun was constitutional, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled Thursday.  At issue before the high court was whether the search of the backpack following an initial search violated the student’s privacy rights, which are generally weaker inside school walls.”


Columbus Dispatch: Officer rules ECOT owes $60 million

“A state hearing officer ruled against ECOT on Wednesday, determining the online school owes $60 million for enrollment that cannot be justified.  The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow could not justify most of its enrollment, and thus was overpaid by $64 million last school year, hearing officer Lawrence Pratt wrote in his recommendation, which now goes to the state Board of Education. He said the board should collect $60 million of that overpayment or deduct it from the school’s future payments.”

 

Akron Beacon Journal: Proposals would ban schools from challenging property taxes or make them pay opponent’s attorneys when they lose

“School districts and businesses are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on lawyers to fight over property taxes.  Schools want to collect more, and businesses try to pay less.  It’s a quiet and expensive game of cat-and-mouse that plays out each year in Columbus or county offices where property values are adjusted, challenged and readjusted. Each tweak impacts tax bills.”

 

TWC News: In Focus: Preparing Students for the Future

“State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria discusses the new graduation requirements and the different paths.”

 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: School leads effort to develop non-grade high school transcript

“More than 100 independent schools, including Hawken and Laurel, have collaborated to invent a high school transcript that shows accomplishments instead of grades.”

 

 

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

 

OHIO: The Start of it All – July 27 – October 14, 2017

The Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery, located in downtown Columbus, presents OHIO: The Start of it All, July 27 – October 14, 2017. Curated by Dan Chudzinski of the University of Findlay’s Mazza Museum, the exhibition consists of 60 original children’s book illustrations based on people, places, inventions, and more related to the great state of Ohio. Exhibition tours will be available beginning in early August through the run of the exhibition. For more information, contact OAC Riffe Gallery Director Mary Gray at mary.gray@oac.ohio.gov or 614-728-2239.

 

Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education

Save the date November 7 for the Greater Cincinnati Alliance for Art Education’s Professional Development Day.  More details will be released in a couple months, for additional information please email info@cincyartsalliance.org.


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The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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