Arts On Line Education Update January 16, 2018

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING RECAP
January 8 – 10

Graduation Requirements

The State Board of Education voted last week to extend the class of 2018’s softer graduation requirements for two more years to students graduating in 2019 and 2020.  Board members sited stability for the school districts and students as well as data collection opportunities as reasons for the two-year extension.  The 2018 graduation pathways were provided as an exception for the class of 2018 as new statewide graduation requirements took effect this school year.

Under the eased rules for the class of 2018, students would still have to earn the required 20 course credits, take all end-of-course exams, and retake any of those math or English exams on which they earned a score of 1 or 2 on a 5-point scale.  But they wouldn’t have to pass the exams. If they didn’t score the required 18 of 35 points, they could graduate by meeting any two of nine other requirements:

  1. 93 percent attendance senior year
  2. A 2.5 GPA in at least four full-year senior-year courses
  3. A senior-year “capstone” project
  4. 120 hours of senior-year work or community service
  5. Three credit hours via College Credit Plus
  6. Passage of an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate class and exam
  7. A “level three” score on each of three components of the WorkKeys test
  8. Industry job credentials totaling at least three points in Ohio’s system
  9. Receipt of an Ohio Means Jobs readiness seal.

In order for the relaxed graduation requirements to be put in place for the next two school years, the board’s recommendation would have to be included in legislation approved by the General Assembly.  If state legislators approve the policy, it still would need the governor’s signature to become law.

The Board plans to continue discussions to create on a long-term solution to the graduation requirements debate on the following timetable:

  • February and March: committee discussion on what the state wants its graduates to know, and how they can demonstrate knowledge skills and attributes; extension of strategic planning discussions; review of survey results on graduation options
  • March through May: committee discussion on the needs and purposes of assessments; engagement with educators and the business sector
  • May through August: discussion of graduation requirements for students with disabilities
  • September and October: review additional data from the class of 2018; finalize recommendations
  • November: committee vote on recommendations
  • December: full board vote on recommendations 

 

Dayton Daily News: Softer Ohio graduation rules may be expanded for 2 more years

“The state school board overwhelmingly recommended Tuesday that softer, non-test-based graduation requirements be extended to the Classes of 2019 and 2020.  The relaxed standards have already been approved for current high school seniors (the Class of 2018). Those students still must pass 20 course credits, but rather than also passing state tests, they can earn a diploma by achieving any two of nine other standards, such as good senior-year attendance and grades, or via a senior-year project plus 120 hours of work or community service.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Board wants to extend relaxed graduation requirements

“The Ohio Board of Education voted 16-1 Tuesday to urge lawmakers to extend relaxed requirements for a high school diploma already given to the class of 2018 to the classes of 2019 and 2020 as well.  “This is our first experience with graduation requirements that aren’t solely test based. We have added these other elements in and we don’t know yet which of these different pathways to graduation are effective are being used by students, or have value,” said board member Laura Kohler of New Albany.” 

State Report Cards

The board’s Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee recommended changes to the state report cards to include a separate report card for first attempts and retakes of end-of-course exams. By separating these data points, the Board and the Department of Education expect more districts would be able to increase their ‘indicators met’. Creating a separate indicator also ensures that schools aren’t discouraged from counseling students who scored low on the first test to retake the test to potentially earn more points toward graduation.

Chris Woolard, senior executive director of the Ohio Department of Education’s Center for Accountability and Continuous Improvement, estimated that if the proposed retake indicator had been in place for the latest report cards, 77.7 percent of districts and more than 66 percent of schools would have met it.

If the measure is approved by the full board in February, the proposed indicators met structure will appear on the 2017-18 school year report cards set to be released in September.

In addition to the specific test retake indicator, Superintendent Paolo DeMaria joined the discussion to paint the picture for broader reform on the report card. DeMaria and Woolard reviewed each of the report card’s six components, identifying commonly heard issues of criticism or questions.

As reported by the Hannah News Service, issues they identified with each element are as follows:

  1. Achievement Component: Meaningful differentiation, proficiency thresholds, the effect of retakes and the inclusion of non-academic indicators in the Indicators Met measure.
  1. Progress Component: The grading scale, the number of years of data used, weight relative to achievement measures, and the overall complexity of the measure.
  1. Gap Closing Component: Meaningful differentiation and the n-size used in calculations.
  1. Graduation Rate Component: Treatment of students with individualized education programs (IEPs), including severely cognitively disabled students.
  1. K-3 Literacy Component: Confusion created by the indicator’s name and its alignment to the third grade reading guarantee, as well as the low grades received by districts with small numbers of struggling readers.
  1. Prepared for Success Component: Appropriateness of the measures used to calculate the component, and the division between which measures are used in the base calculation and which are used to accrue bonus points.
  1. Composite Grade Calculation: Weighting of progress versus achievement components, the generally necessity of an overall grade, the use of an A-F scale and comparability.

Columbus Dispatch: Critics want revamp of Ohio’s report cards on schools

“Colorful and packed with a cornucopia of data and letter grades spread across numerous educational categories, Ohio’s state report cards.  But how that data are calculated and translated has turned the annual report card into a lightning rod of criticism from teachers, parents and education officials who question whether the information is understandable or fair, or if it provides an accurate measure of a district’s academic performance.”

Strategic Planning

ODE Chief Strategy Officer Shaun Yoder led the Strategic Planning discussion with the board last Wednesday. The majority of the time was spent on deliberating the state-level vision and overarching goal which read as follows:  

The state-level vision: Each Ohio high school graduate is prepared with the knowledge and skills to pursue his/her chosen post high-school path and become a life-long learner who is an engaged, culturally-aware and contributing member of society.

The overarching goal: To significantly increase the number of graduates who, within a year of graduating, are enrolled and succeeding in post-secondary learning, serving in the military or working in a full-time job that pays a living wage.

The board also reviewed draft lists of strategies identified by the Early Learning and Literacy workgroup and the Student Supports, School Climate and Culture workgroup.  These discussed strategies are still subject to change.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, January 16
4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121
House Education & Career Readiness Committee Chair Brenner

HB428 (Ginter, LaTourette) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
STUDENT EXPRESSION
HCR11 (Gavarone) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
EDUCATION PLAN
HB418 (Ingram) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
STUDENT RECORDS
HB246 (Boccieri, Rezabek) 3rd Hearing-All testimony
CLASSROOM FACILITIES

Wednesday, January 17 

3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room
Senate Education Committee Chair Lehner

HB98 (Duffey, Boggs) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
CAREER INFORMATION

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer: ECOT could close this month, loses money, “sponsor” support

“The controversial ECOT online charter school could close by the end of this month after financial woes led its sponsor and oversight agency to pull away. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) was told Wednesday by its sponsor, the Educational Service Center of Lake Erie West, that it will suspend its sponsorship because the school cannot meet its financial and legal obligations for the rest of this school year.”

Columbus Dispatch: School districts brace for influx of ECOT students

“What does it look like when thousands of students — roughly the enrollment of one of Ohio’s largest school districts — suddenly lose their school? Ohio might be on the verge of finding out, as the online Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, where between 12,000 and 20,000 students attend at any given time, could close within a week because of the lack of a sponsor and bonded treasurer.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: What attributes should a high school graduate have? It’s not just the “three R’s” anymore

“What should a high school graduate look like in Ohio? The state school board has been weighing that broad and sweeping topic the last few months as members develop long range goals that can shape the future of Ohio’s schools.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

USDOE Releases Education Revenues & Expenditure Data

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics released its latest revenues and expenditures report (FY15) for public elementary and secondary schools. The report includes national and state totals, revenues by source, expenditures by function and object, and current and instructional expenditures per pupil.

USDOE/IES/NCES: Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2014–15 (Fiscal Year 2015)

“This report contains national and state totals of revenues and expenditures. This First Look includes revenues by source and expenditures by function and object, including current expenditures per pupil and instructional expenditures per pupil.”

The 74: The States That Spend the Most (and Least) on Education — and How Their Students Perform Compared With Their Neighbors

“Across the United States, current expenditures for public K-12 education rose by over $18 billion during the 2014–15 school year, according to a new report released by the National Center for Education Statistics. That uptick was part of a 5 percent increase since fiscal year 2013, and total expenditures stood at $575 billion overall for the year.”

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor
The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for grades 4-12 teachers of all content areas on Wednesday, January 31.
Mimi Herman, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “STEAM Poetry:  Teaching Science through Metaphor” from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center.  Participants will discover how various concepts and techniques explore the transformation of science into poetry.
Location: Tri-County ESC, 741 Winkler Dr. Wooster, OH
Date: January 31, 2018
Time: 4:30-7:30 p.m.
Register by emailing tesc_stoler@tccsa.net
Chance to Dance
Momentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.
These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and OhioDance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.
The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details.
Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference
The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference. The deadline to register is January 19, 2018.
Location: Columbus Convention Center
Date: February 8-10, 2018

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success
OAAE logo
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.
Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)
Workshops will focus on these topics:
  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
614.224.1060
Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.
Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events

Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE: Sara Lawrence-Sucato

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE   

18193409_1491276457603571_7943907651804574853_o.jpg

Sara Lawrence-Sucato
Art Educator
Sara Lawrence-Sucato is the Tour Manager and Outreach Instructor for the Dancing Wheels Company & School, in addition to being a company member. She is a teaching artist with VSA Ohio and OAAE’s Artists in Schools program.

 

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: I grew up in the Columbus area, and my parents started me in dance lessons when I was a child.  I also took theatre, singing, and magic classes. Performing arts is what I grew to love. I am so fortunate that as a professional dance artist (performer, choreographer and teacher), I can do what I love and it’s my career!

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: My work with The Dancing Wheels Company & School as a professional dancer and as an outreach instructor allows me to spread our message of disability awareness and inclusion on many levels. It’s always rewarding to witness a young person realize that a person with a disability isn’t disabled, she is just differently abled.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A:  I am inspired by seeing other professional dance artists excel at their craft, whether it be in the studio, classroom or on stage and I strive to be, create, educate and inspire at the highest level for me.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: A person in a wheelchair will find it difficult, nearly impossible I might add, to obtain a degree in dance from an establishment of higher education. There are a small number of teachers who can accommodate physically integrated dance within their course of study. At Dancing Wheels, we believe that by broadening the base of teachers who are apt to teaching physically integrated dance, we can accommodate more students with and without disabilities within our studios and classrooms

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: I have all of my dance teachers from childhood through college and at present as a professional in my field to thank. When I was very young, my teachers at Columbus Parks and Recreation and Powell Ballet kept dance classes fun and entertaining. At Columbus Youth Ballet, I further developed the love of dancing with such a broad spectrum of classes and a diverse cast of teachers showing me what all there is out there to do. At times when I seemed broken, both physically and emotionally, my teachers at Columbus Dance Theatre proved to be a huge support in my life. For helping to develop me as a person and as a dancer, and for influencing my teaching ability/persona now, I am deeply grateful to my teacher mentors.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Since we know that the arts in learning provide benefits such as academic achievement, critical thinking skills, and social and emotional development, then continue to integrate arts in education. Bring artists into your schools to work with teachers in enhancing the learning process through the arts.   


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you would like to submit your information or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

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Arts On Line Education Update January 8, 2018

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE   

sara lawrence sucato 1 crp

Sara Lawrence-Sucato
Art Educator
Sara Lawrence-Sucato is the Tour Manager and Outreach Instructor for the Dancing Wheels Company & School, in addition to being a company member. She is a teaching artist with VSA Ohio and OAAE’s Artists in Schools program.

 

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: I grew up in the Columbus area, and my parents started me in dance lessons when I was a child.  I also took theatre, singing, and magic classes. Performing arts is what I grew to love. I am so fortunate that as a professional dance artist (performer, choreographer and teacher), I can do what I love and it’s my career!

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: My work with The Dancing Wheels Company & School as a professional dancer and as an outreach instructor allows me to spread our message of disability awareness and inclusion on many levels. It’s always rewarding to witness a young person realize that a person with a disability isn’t disabled, she is just differently abled.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A:  I am inspired by seeing other professional dance artists excel at their craft, whether it be in the studio, classroom or on stage and I strive to be, create, educate and inspire at the highest level for me.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: A person in a wheelchair will find it difficult, nearly impossible I might add, to obtain a degree in dance from an establishment of higher education. There are a small number of teachers who can accommodate physically integrated dance within their course of study. At Dancing Wheels, we believe that by broadening the base of teachers who are apt to teaching physically integrated dance, we can accommodate more students with and without disabilities within our studios and classrooms

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: I have all of my dance teachers from childhood through college and at present as a professional in my field to thank. When I was very young, my teachers at Columbus Parks and Recreation and Powell Ballet kept dance classes fun and entertaining. At Columbus Youth Ballet, I further developed the love of dancing with such a broad spectrum of classes and a diverse cast of teachers showing me what all there is out there to do. At times when I seemed broken, both physically and emotionally, my teachers at Columbus Dance Theatre proved to be a huge support in my life. For helping to develop me as a person and as a dancer, and for influencing my teaching ability/persona now, I am deeply grateful to my teacher mentors.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Since we know that the arts in learning provide benefits such as academic achievement, critical thinking skills, and social and emotional development, then continue to integrate arts in education. Bring artists into your schools to work with teachers in enhancing the learning process through the arts.   


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio. If you would like to submit your information or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

ODE: Department releases Quality Model for STEM and STEAM Schools

“The Quality Model for STEM and STEAM Schools from the Ohio Department of Education is now available. This document clarifies high-quality STEM and STEAM school practices and gives examples. Schools seeking STEM or STEAM designation or those interested in innovative instructional approaches should consult this document. Additional information on STEM topics can be found on the Department’s STEM webpage.” 

ODE: Ohio Announces the OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal for Ohio High School Graduates to Show Workplace Readiness

“Ohio high school students now can earn recognition by showing they are prepared to contribute to the workplace and their communities. The OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal is a formal designation students can earn on their high school diplomas and transcripts indicating they have the personal strengths, strong work ethic and professional experience that businesses need.” 

Columbus Dispatch: State Unveils a New Seal for Ohio Graduates to Show Job Readiness

“Members of the high school class of 2018 now have one more option toward earning a diploma: getting adults to attest that they have skills that would help in a job setting, such as leadership, punctuality, being technologically savvy and an ability to solve problems.”

ODE: Striving Readers grants available: application workshop planned for January

“Ohio received a $35 million Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Grant from the U.S. Department of Education to continue improving language and literacy development in Ohio students.  The Department is hosting a two-day Literacy Academy in Columbus Jan. 17-18 for those who are eligible to apply. Academy participants will receive technical assistance with their applications, as well as instruction on improving evidence-based language and literacy instruction and interventions.”

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, January 8

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, January 9

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

 

OHIO NEWS

This Week: Olentangy’s Juravich makes short list of nation’s top teachers

“An Olentangy elementary school teacher is a finalist for the National Teacher of the Year award. The Council of Chief State School Officers on Jan. 4 announced Olentangy’s Jonathan Juravich is one of four teachers up for the nationwide honor. Juravich, an art teacher at Liberty Tree Elementary School just north of Powell, was named the 2018 Ohio Teacher of the Year by the Ohio Department of Education last September.” 

Columbus Dispatch: High School Graduation Rates Highest in U.S. History – Columbus Dispatch

“For the first time in U.S. history, the proportion of Americans 25 and older who have earned their high-school diplomas has topped 90 percent, according to U.S. Census data released on Friday. Educational attainment has been increasing steadily over the decades. In 1940, 75.9 percent of U.S. adults hadn’t finished high school.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Tests Should Be Cut Back Further, State School Board Tells Ohio Legislature

“The state school board is asking the Ohio legislature to wipe out three items that add a testing burden to teachers and students — the high school English I exam, WorkKeys tests for some career training students and requirements that some tests be given just to evaluate teachers.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s Test Score Graduation Requirements Could Be Eased for Classes of 2019 and 2020

“Ohio’s new test score requirements to graduate from high school could be eased again, under plans gaining traction in the state school board. Statewide requirements that students score well on state tests in order to earn a diploma took effect with the class of 2018, this year’s senior class. But worries about a graduation “apocalypse” or “trainwreck” because of low scores led the board and state legislature to ease the requirements earlier this year, just for the senior class.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Feds Give Feedback on Ohio’s ESSA Plan
In December, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) requested the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) revise the state’s submitted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan by January 4. Education Week noted that the USDOE flagged Ohio for issues in its accountability system and process for identifying low-performing schools. USDOE feedback said the plan was unclear on how the state is considering English-language proficiency as a separate indicator since it is incorporated into its gap-closing measure, needs to better explain how the gap-closing measure fits into the overall system, and needs to ensure timelines for flagging struggling schools comply with law. ODE submitted Ohio’s original plan in September 2017.

US News & World Report: Concerns Mount Over K-12 Education Plans

“As states cement education plans for their schools under the federal K-12 law, the Department of Education is working furiously to assess them amid mounting concerns about states’ commitment to following the law, their proposals to ensure historically disadvantaged students have access to quality education, and the department’s capacity – and in some cases, lack of desire – to police it all.”

 

 

FYI ARTS

TeachArtsOhio
The application for the Ohio Arts Council’s newest arts learning program, TeachArtsOhio, is now open. The deadline to apply is February 1, 2018. TeachArtsOhio’s goal is to expand learning opportunities through the arts and increase academic achievement across the state.
Through TeachArtsOhio, the Ohio Arts Council will provide funding to support professional teaching artists to teach in schools and classrooms for up to the full 2018-19 school year at no cost to the school district. 100 percent of the artist fees are paid for using Ohio Arts Council funds, alleviating financial burdens from school and district budgets. No cash match is required.
Teaching artists will work with school faculty and staff to bring their education communities together with teaching artists to share engaging, personal, high-quality arts learning experiences.
The Ohio Arts Council’s Arts Learning staff welcomes the opportunity to attend meetings or events in your area to share information about the new TeachArtsOhio program and answer any questions.
The application deadline is February 1, 2018. For more information about the program and how to apply, visit oac.ohio.gov.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Chance to Dance
Momentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.
These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and OhioDance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.
The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details.
Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels
Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference
 
The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.
Location: Columbus Convention Center
Date: February 8-10, 2018

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success
OAAE logo
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.
Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)
Workshops will focus on these topics:
  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
614.224.1060
Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.
Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/Events

Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Portrait of an Arts Advocate: Jonathan Juravich

juravich2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Juravich
Art Educator

Jonathan Juravich is a visual arts instructor at Liberty Tree Elementary School in the Olentangy Local School District, and is an Adjunct Instructor for Art Education at Otterbein University. He is the 2018 Ohio Teacher of the Year.

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: My parents are both artists and it is they that first ignited my love for art. I grew up in this amazingly creative family where we visited museums, discussed architecture, and spent time creating art together around the kitchen table or moving all the furniture out of the living room to paint on large canvases. I attended Saturday morning classes as the Carnegie Museum of Art (I’m from Pittsburgh) where I had the opportunity to sit and draw in the great halls of the natural history museum or spend time with Monet’s waterlilies. I also attended classes at Carnegie Mellon University throughout High School. Through out it all my parents encouraged and supported me in my artistic endeavors but also in my education as a well-rounded person. They continue to provide support and encouragement for me but also the students in my school. They have not missed a single art show of my students’ work in the past 10 years. And now that I am a parent (of a 4 year old and 7 month old) I have the same opportunities to engage my kids in creative explorations and time spent together.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: That moment where a student brings you their recent work and the creativity just blows you away. Watching students take a concept that I have laid in front of them and make it their own. I am so fortunate to be a part of so many magical moments of discovery.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: My work with my students inspires me each and every day. That moment where a student brings you their recent work and the creativity just blows you away. In the past I have used quotes from my students to inspire my illustrative works. But most recently seeing the world through my four year-old daughter’s eyes has been incredible. We collaborated on a project last summer where we painted images of lumberjack folklore together. The completed collection was on view at a gallery at Otterbein University. We have plans for a new series together and I can’t wait to get started. AND… in so many ways my classroom is my studio. I delight in dreaming up and developing new ideas, concepts, artists to explore, and the instructional means in which to present it all to my students. I believe in having an enthusiastic, creative approach to all that I do.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: I believe whole-heartedly in collaboration. For as many years as I have been teaching I have worked to engage my students in creative pursuits where they have to work together. This may be an all school installation, a class mural, or a grade level sculpture. When we work together, truly work together, we are able to navigate different perspectives, learn to communicate, observe our strengths, and accomplish so much more than if we strived to complete the work on our own. At the root of a solid collaborative experience is the concepts of respect and empathy.  In our society competition and achievement are celebrated, often at the cost of compassionate, supportive relationships. The antidote is a focus on respect and empathy. Students exhibit behaviors that are a reflection of actions modeled for them by adults. As an educators, I can demonstrate the importance of addressing everything we do with respect and empathy…especially our collaborative experience together.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: My high school art educators Carol Dewitt and Linda Hilbish encouraged me and gave me the opportunity to be a leader in the arts for my peers at a young age. My professors at Otterbein University Nicholas Hill, Joanne Stichweh, and Gretchen Cochran continue to lend a listening ear and supportive words- long after I left their studios.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Communication. Sharing what awesome things are happening in the world of art education with others. We have this amazing opportunity to share finished works with stake holders and the greater community. The key is also the communication about the process and the context- what was learned and explored. By sharing images and the context that goes with them we are able to advocate for the importance of a high quality arts education for all students. One way I have been able to engage with the community is our annual Festival of Fine Arts at Liberty Tree Elementary School. It is an opportunity to celebrate our students work with the community and for students to take pride in their accomplishments. On this night the school resembles a museum: There is the Hall of Portraits, a Hall of Architecture, and so on.  Posted on the wall are explanations of the concepts explored. And there are directions to lead families through creative explorations themselves. It is a night when families are able to come together to celebrate visual art and their student’s role in our visual culture. As the parent, grandparent, community member, or proud teacher- it is then our role to share the incredible work and thought process of our students with others.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

Posted in Portrait of an Arts Advocate | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update December 11, 2017

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE  

juravich2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Juravich
Art Educator

Jonathan Juravich is a visual arts instructor at Liberty Tree Elementary School in the Olentangy Local School District, and is an Adjunct Instructor for Art Education at Otterbein University. He is the 2018 Ohio Teacher of the Year.

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: My parents are both artists and it is they that first ignited my love for art. I grew up in this amazingly creative family where we visited museums, discussed architecture, and spent time creating art together around the kitchen table or moving all the furniture out of the living room to paint on large canvases. I attended Saturday morning classes as the Carnegie Museum of Art (I’m from Pittsburgh) where I had the opportunity to sit and draw in the great halls of the natural history museum or spend time with Monet’s waterlilies. I also attended classes at Carnegie Mellon University throughout High School. Through out it all my parents encouraged and supported me in my artistic endeavors but also in my education as a well-rounded person. They continue to provide support and encouragement for me but also the students in my school. They have not missed a single art show of my students’ work in the past 10 years. And now that I am a parent (of a 4 year old and 7 month old) I have the same opportunities to engage my kids in creative explorations and time spent together.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: That moment where a student brings you their recent work and the creativity just blows you away. Watching students take a concept that I have laid in front of them and make it their own. I am so fortunate to be a part of so many magical moments of discovery.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: My work with my students inspires me each and every day. That moment where a student brings you their recent work and the creativity just blows you away. In the past I have used quotes from my students to inspire my illustrative works. But most recently seeing the world through my four year-old daughter’s eyes has been incredible. We collaborated on a project last summer where we painted images of lumberjack folklore together. The completed collection was on view at a gallery at Otterbein University. We have plans for a new series together and I can’t wait to get started. AND… in so many ways my classroom is my studio. I delight in dreaming up and developing new ideas, concepts, artists to explore, and the instructional means in which to present it all to my students. I believe in having an enthusiastic, creative approach to all that I do.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: I believe whole-heartedly in collaboration. For as many years as I have been teaching I have worked to engage my students in creative pursuits where they have to work together. This may be an all school installation, a class mural, or a grade level sculpture. When we work together, truly work together, we are able to navigate different perspectives, learn to communicate, observe our strengths, and accomplish so much more than if we strived to complete the work on our own. At the root of a solid collaborative experience is the concepts of respect and empathy.  In our society competition and achievement are celebrated, often at the cost of compassionate, supportive relationships. The antidote is a focus on respect and empathy. Students exhibit behaviors that are a reflection of actions modeled for them by adults. As an educators, I can demonstrate the importance of addressing everything we do with respect and empathy…especially our collaborative experience together.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: My high school art educators Carol Dewitt and Linda Hilbish encouraged me and gave me the opportunity to be a leader in the arts for my peers at a young age. My professors at Otterbein University Nicholas Hill, Joanne Stichweh, and Gretchen Cochran continue to lend a listening ear and supportive words- long after I left their studios.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Communication. Sharing what awesome things are happening in the world of art education with others. We have this amazing opportunity to share finished works with stake holders and the greater community. The key is also the communication about the process and the context- what was learned and explored. By sharing images and the context that goes with them we are able to advocate for the importance of a high quality arts education for all students. One way I have been able to engage with the community is our annual Festival of Fine Arts at Liberty Tree Elementary School. It is an opportunity to celebrate our students work with the community and for students to take pride in their accomplishments. On this night the school resembles a museum: There is the Hall of Portraits, a Hall of Architecture, and so on.  Posted on the wall are explanations of the concepts explored. And there are directions to lead families through creative explorations themselves. It is a night when families are able to come together to celebrate visual art and their student’s role in our visual culture. As the parent, grandparent, community member, or proud teacher- it is then our role to share the incredible work and thought process of our students with others.


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Live Webinar for STEAM School Designation: December 13

The Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN) is hosting a live webinar on December 13, 2017 for schools interested in applying for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) or STEAM (science, technology, engineering, ARTS, and mathematics) designation this school year. Registration information is available online, or by contacting OSLN directly at osln@battelle.org.

The Ohio Department of Education is now accepting applications for schools interested in the STEM, or STEAM designations.  Proposals will be reviewed by the STEM committee and the Ohio STEM Learning Network, and new designations will be effective beginning Fiscal Year 2019. Schools planning to apply for STEM or STEAM designation should submit a letter of intent before 5:00 p.m. December 20, 2017 to holly.lavender@education.ohio.gov.  For more information visit the ODE STEM webpage.

Ohio Department of Education recognizes Schools of Promise and Schools of Honor

“Ohio is recognizing 12 schools for maintaining high academic achievement among their students, including many from economically disadvantaged circumstances that can make learning difficult.

The Ohio Department of Education named two Schools of Promise, four High Performing Schools of Honor and nine High Progress Schools of Honor. Each program has its own criteria. Two schools received more than one award.

A complete list of Schools of Promise and Schools of Honor is available here.”

 

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

Passed by the Senate: HB170

The Senate unanimously passed HB170 (Carfagna-Duffey), by a vote of 31-0. This bill calls for the Department of Education to develop optional academic content standards and model curriculum for computer science, details how schools can integrate courses on the topic, and addresses educator qualifications for computer science.

Because HB170 allows students to substitute advanced computer science for Algebra II, the latest version of the bill includes Senate language requiring parents to sign a form acknowledging their student may not be eligible to attend certain higher education institutions.  The amendment was in response to concerns that students or parents won’t realize the importance of Algebra II, which is a perquisite for admission to most Ohio colleges and universities, until it’s too late.

Columbus Dispatch: Computer Science Instead of Algebra II? Ohio Students May Soon Have a Choice

“A bill designed to encourage Ohio schools to offer more computer science courses, including those that could replace some math and science requirements, got unanimous approval Tuesday from the Ohio Senate.  As tech companies continue to report struggles to fill jobs, House Bill 170 is designed to ensure the state establishes computer science standards while providing students more course options.”

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Presentation by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Brian Roget, Associate Director of the Department of Education’s Office of Curriculum and Assessment, on revisions to Ohio’s English Language Arts and Math Model Curriculum.  (Presentation) 

More information on the ODE process for revising standard can be found on the ODE Ohio Learning Standards Revisions webpage.  This page provides information about the revisions to Ohio’s Learning Standards in English language arts and mathematics, which were approved in February 2017, as well as the ongoing updating process for science, social studies and financial literacy standards. Also, find links to learn about revisions to standards for several career-technical programs.

Amendment Accepted for HB176 SCHOOL TESTING (Thompson)

With to regard to state achievement assessments, statewide academic content standards and model curricula, and teacher and administrator evaluations.

The committee accepted an amendment proposed by the bill’s sponsor, Representative Andy Thompson (R-Marietta) with an 8-7 vote.  The amendment made several changes to the original bill including the following:

  • Specifies state exams must be the Iowa Test of Basic Skills,
  • eliminates the requirement that the third-grade reading test that determines retention be administered in the fall,
  • requires schools to detail any data applications they’re using and any grants they’ve applied for or are thinking of applying for,
  • and prohibits the state from requiring schools to administer state tests on computers. 

 

Senate Education Committee 

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Opponent & Interested party testimony on SB216 SCHOOL REGULATIONS (Huffman)

During the third hearing for SB216 more than 20 witnesses came forward with opponent and interested party testimony.  However, due to time limitations half were rescheduled to appear at a future meeting to reduce the length of the agenda.

Ohio Department of Education Superintendent Paolo DeMaria was one of the many witnesses who testified as an interested party, however his focus was mainly on concerns he had with the bill.  “I recognize that there are some educators in Ohio who feel burdened by regulations. My staff and I are constantly in discussion with district leaders and educators about ways to improve Ohio’s education system, including the elimination of unnecessary regulations,” DeMaria stated.  “While some of the changes proposed in SB216 reflect that balance, many of the changes would be a step backward for Ohio. As written, SB216 would have wide consequences, including impeding the strides Ohio has made in early childhood education, unnecessarily duplicating current administrative efforts and, in several instances, putting the safety of Ohio’s students at risk.”

Among concerns DeMaria raised were the following:

  • Allowing districts to administer tests other than the current state-wide Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) test for Ohio’s pre-school aged students, or no test at all, would impact the current measure of literacy improvement on the state report card.
  • Allowing unlicensed staff to serve as substitute education aides creates gaps in the professional conduct system Ohio uses to keep track of school employees who behave inappropriately.
  • Allowing district-approved versus state-approved tests to be the source of data for academic growth measures in teacher evaluations could crate inconsistency across the state.
  • Some licensure changes might provide flexibility for administrators but do not recognize the need for content expertise or different learning methods of students at various ages.
  • Restrictions on where students can take College Credit Plus courses limit choice and the ability of students to be exposed to the college environment.

SB216 was created in collaboration with superintendents in bill sponsor Matt Huffman’s district.  These superintendents identified state mandates in law that they felt added to school district costs, or were inefficient or ineffective. The bill’s stated intent was to reduce regulations and mandates for local schools to increase local control, improve efficiency, and reduce costs, while still supporting improved student achievement.

A review of OAAE’s analysis of SB216 can be viewed here.

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Speaker Releases Schedule for First Half of 2018

Speaker of the House Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) has released the schedule for January through June, 2018. The first session for the new year is set for Wednesday, January 17; the last is set for Wednesday, May 23. Sessions after May 23 through June are all “if needed.” 

Monday, December 11

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Tuesday, December 12

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

4:00 p.m.  Ohio Statehouse Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Chr. Brenner, A

HB377 (Hagan/Ramos) 2nd Hearing, Sponsor/Proponent Testimony

Require age-appropriate sexual abuse and violence instruction

HB246 (Boccieri/Rezabek) 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

Provide funding for county DD board classroom facilities

HB360 (Greenspan) 3rd Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

Enact Ohio Anti-Bullying and Hazing Act

HB108 (Hagan/McColley) 4th Hearing, All Testimony *PA  

Include financial literacy in high school curriculum

 

Wednesday, December 13

2:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee Chr. Lehner

SB216  (Huffman, M.) 4th Hearing- Proponent/Opponent/Interested Party

SCHOOL REGULATIONS

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Education Week: U.S. Graduation Rate Hits New All-Time High

“The national high school graduation rate has risen to a new all-time high: 84 percent, the fifth straight year of increases, according to data published by the federal government today.  The graduation rate for the high school class of 2015-16 is nearly a whole point higher than the one for the previous year’s class, which was 83.2 percent, according to the new data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The rate measures the proportion of each freshman class that earns a diploma four years later.”

 

USDOE: Guidance Regarding Special Education Ruling Released

“This past March, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Endrew F. vs. Douglas County determining that districts have the obligation to provide students in special education with something beyond a minimal quality or “de minimis” education. In response to the ruling, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) released a Q&A this week regarding its impacts. The Q&A provides an overview of the case and ruling, clarification of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act’s (IDEA) Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) requirement, and considerations for implementation.”

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update December 4, 2017

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

STEAM School Designation Applications Now Available

The Ohio General Assembly recently passed legislation to designate STEAM schools in Ohio, which are STEM schools that also emphasize the arts.  The Ohio Department of Education is now accepting applications for schools interested in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), or STEAM (science, technology, engineering, ARTS, and mathematics) designations.  Proposals will be reviewed by the STEM committee and the Ohio STEM Learning Network, and new designations will be effective beginning Fiscal Year 2019.

Schools planning to apply for STEM or STEAM designation should submit a letter of intent before 5:00 p.m. December 20, 2017, to holly.lavender@education.ohio.gov.

Proposals for STEM and STEAM schools must include at least all of the following:

  • Evidence of a working partnership with both public and private entities, including higher education entities and business organizations; (If the proposal is for a STEAM school, this partnership must include arts organizations.)

Evidence that the school submitting the proposal will offer a rigorous, diverse, integrated and project-based curriculum to students in any of grades kindergarten through twelve, with the goal to prepare those students for college, the workforce, and citizenship, and that

  • emphasizes the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in promoting innovation and economic progress, incorporates scientific inquiry and technological design,
  • includes the arts and humanities, and
  • emphasizes personalized learning and teamwork skills.

Proposals for STEAM schools must also specifically demonstrate how the curriculum will integrate arts and design into the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to foster creative thinking, problem-solving, and new approaches to scientific invention.

The Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN) offers technical assistance to schools interested in the designation process. OSLN is hosting a live webinar on December 13, 2017, for schools interested in applying for STEM or STEAM designation this school year. Registration information is available here, or by contacting OSLN directly at osln@battelle.org.

Ohio Department of Education STEM/STEAM website.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee
The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Presentation from ODE: Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria and Brian Roget, associate director of the Department of Education’s Office of Curriculum and Assessment, detailed the proposed revisions to social studies, financial literacy and math standards.   The presentation can be viewed here

More information on the ODE process for revising standard can be found on the ODE Ohio Learning Standards Revisions webpage.  This page provides information about the revisions to Ohio’s Learning Standards in English language arts and mathematics, which were approved in February 2017, as well as the ongoing updating process for science, social studies and financial literacy standards. Also, find links to learn about revisions to standards for several career-technical programs. 

Proponent and Opponent testimony on HB200 (Koehler)  To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

With its eighth hearing, the committee continued to hear from both supporters and opponents of HB200.  The bill was amended to reduce the financial threshold for eligibility from family incomes at or below 400 percent of the federal poverty level to family incomes at or below 300 percent.  However, according to bill sponsor Rep. Kyle Koehler, students who enter the program under the 300 percent threshold could continue to receive a voucher if family income later rises, so long as it stays below 400 percent.

The threat to public school funding was the common theme of HB200 opponents, including Joseph Spiccia, superintendent of the Wickliffe City School District and chair of the Lake/Geauga Superintendents’ Collaborative.  “While the provision has been made that school districts will not see direct deductions from district state funding amounts, it is reasonable to assume that the proposed voucher program will further reduce the collective amount available to fund the PK-12 budget at the state level,” he said in written testimony. “As a result, public school districts will see an overall indirect reduction in state funding amounts that will continue to impact their financial outlook.”

Proponents of the bill included the testimony of two students, one who was able to attend a private school through vouchers and one who was excluded with the current criteria for eligibility.   Sharla Elton, superintendent and principal of Heritage Christian School, said the school boasts a 100 percent graduation rate and test scores that supersede those of area public schools. “Simply stated, different environments can serve children differently. Each child deserves a learning environment that best suits his or her needs,” Elta said.  “Increased choice means that everyone must raise their standards in order to compete for students. That means we do a better job of educating children, for a lower cost to the taxpayer.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Plan to Expand Tuition Vouchers for Private Schools Gaining New Life in Ohio House

“A plan to expand Ohio’s private school tuition voucher program to more middle-class families could soon go to vote in the Ohio House, despite stalling out in the Senate earlier this year.  House Bill 200, just like the earlier proposal in the Senate from State Sen. Matt Huffman, would combine the three voucher programs Ohio has now — one with strict income requirements, one for students in “failing” schools and one for only Cleveland residents — into a single program.”  

Proponent and Opponent testimony on HB21 (Hambley) Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

Testifying on behalf of the Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA) and the Ohio Association of School Business Officials (OASBO), was Tom Ash, director of governmental relations for BASA.  He praised updates to the bill that require charter school governing authorities to set enrollment and attendance policies focused on residency verification.

“One of the principal challenges in the present system of verifying the district of residence for community school students is that the resident district has no authority to require the parents of community school students to verify their addresses with the resident school district,” Ash said.

“We feel that this version of the bill appropriately assigns the responsibility for the monitoring of students’ residences to the entity that ultimately is responsible for the supervision and oversight of the community school.”

Under the bill, the governing authority would be required to conduct a monthly review of residency records and verify addresses of students to the Department of Education on an annual basis, he said. Currently, district schools must do so for the students who attend charter schools.

 

NEWLY INTRODUCED LEGISLATION

HB418 (Ingram)  To require a public or chartered nonpublic school to transmit a student’s records within five business days when the student transfers to another school.

Rep. Ingram introduced HB418 in an effort to standardize the timeframe for transferring education records.   The legislation requires traditional, private and charter schools to submit records to schools that students are transferring to within five school days of a request.  According to Ingram, there is no standard timeframe for a transfer of records, however the new measure does not impose penalties on schools that fail to meet the timeline.

HB428 (Ginter, LaTourette) Regarding student religious expression and to entitle the act the “Ohio Student Religious Liberties Act of 2018.”

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Speaker Releases Schedule for First Half of 2018

Speaker of the House Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) has released the schedule for January through June, 2018. The first session for the new year is set for Wednesday, Jan. 17; the last is set for Wednesday, May 23. Sessions after May 23 through June are all “if needed.” 

Tuesday, December 5
4:00 p.m.  Ohio Statehouse Room 121
House Education & Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

Presentation by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria on Revisions to Ohio’s English Language Arts and Math Model Curriculum
HB338  (Ginter) 4th Hearing, All testimony
SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
HB176  (Thompson) 4th Hearing, Interested party
SCHOOL TESTING

Wednesday, December 6
2:00 p.m. Senate South Hearing Room
Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

Presentation from State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria on model curricula
SB216  (Huffman) 3rd Hearing, Opponent & interested party
SCHOOL REGULATIONS

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer More than 68,000 High School Students Took College Courses in 2016-2017 Academic Year

“More than 68,000 high school students took in Ohio college classes during the 2016-17 academic year, earning college credit while meeting their high school graduation requirements and collectively saving more than $144 million on the cost of higher education, the Ohio Department of Higher Education announced Monday.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Computer science instead of Algebra II in Ohio high schools?

“Ohio schools could allow students to take a computer science class instead of algebra II under a bill that supporters say can focus students on today’s in-demand jobs.  But some lawmakers are concerned it could hinder the ability of students to get into universities that require algebra II as a prerequisite for admission.  House Bill 170 passed the House in June and last week was approved by a Senate committee, setting up a vote by the full chamber. It has earned praise from technology companies who say they are struggling to fill jobs.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

State Impact Ohio: Congressional Changes To 529 Plans Won’t Mean Much For Ohio Officials

“When members of Congress return to Washington next week, they’ll continue working on a tax reform plan that supporters say will aid the middle class in a number of ways, including expanding school choice options.  Both the House and Senate versions of the bill include a provision to change the 529 college savings plan.”

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

 

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Arts On Line Education Update November 27, 2017

OHIO EDUCATIONAL POLICY

School Funding Workgroup Created

The School Funding Workgroup was convened as a ‘volunteer’ group of legislators and educators chaired by Representatives Robert Cupp and John Patterson.  The stated purpose of the Workgroup is to conduct a thorough review of the state’s method for determining its education resource investment and distribution among the state’s school districts and other education entities, and to provide recommendations for their improvement and modernization.

The Workgroup will meet the third Wednesday of each month and is currently divided into seven subgroups:

  1. Minimum per pupil investment-State share/charge off
  2. Special & Gifted education
  3. Poverty & Pre-K education
  4. ESC’s , Career Tech, STEM
  5. Open enrollment, charter schools, vouchers
  6. Transportation
  7. Technology

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: Licensure rule changes provide certain educators and their employers with more flexibility

“The State Board of Education has approved several Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) rule changes that now affect educators seeking supplemental, short-term substitute and alternative resident educator licenses. Another rule change will assist educators who have worked at schools out of state when they wish to renew their Ohio professional educator licenses. 

The rule changes reflect the following:

  • Supplemental license course requirement removed.
  • “Short-term” definition for substitute licenses expanded.
  • Out-of-state teachers can renew their Ohio professional licenses more easily.
  • Alternative resident educator license reflects Senate Bill 3. The rules now reflect changes made in state law through Senate Bill 3, effective March 2017 by first removing the content area coursework requirements for the initial alternative resident educator license. Additionally, those pursuing the alternative career-technical workforce development license must complete a university-approved performance-based assessment rather than the Resident Educator Summative Assessment (RESA). OAC 3301-24-19 and 3301-24-22
  • Pupil activity permit requirements updated. In accordance with Ohio Senate Bill 252 (Lindsay’s Law), the rules now reflect the annual sudden cardiac arrest training requirement for pupil activity permit holders. Additional amendments include clarification of who is required to hold a pupil activity permit. OAC 3301-27-01
  • Twelve-hour and 40-hour temporary teaching permit qualifications reflect state law changes. Individuals who have at least a bachelor’s degree or significant work experience in the subject area they will teach now qualify for a 12-hour or 40-hour temporary teaching permit. OAC 3301-23-41″

 

LEGISLATIVE SPOTLIGHT: SB216

Summary of SB216: The Ohio Public School Deregulation Act
by OAAE Consultant Joan Platz

Senator Matt Huffman (R-Lima) introduced SB216 on October 10, 2017, the Ohio Public School Deregulation Act. The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Peggy Lehner, is now holding hearings on the bill. According to Senator Huffman, the bill was developed based on the recommendations from several school superintendents in his 12th Senate District (Lima), and from other superintendents around the state. A working group from the Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA) also contributed to the bill.

These superintendents identified state mandates in law that added to school district costs, or were inefficient or ineffective. The bill’s intent is to reduce regulations and mandates for local schools to increase local control, improve efficiency, and reduce costs, while still supporting improved student achievement.

One of the bill’s provisions, for example, changes state law to revise Ohio’s Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) based on the recommendations of the Educator Standards Board and the State Board of Education. The Ohio Education Association is also working on a bill with Senator Peggy Lehner to revise OTES.  But relaxing other mandates, such as the requirement that teachers be certified in the subjects that they are teaching, could lower the quality and effectiveness of classroom instruction, which could lower student achievement.

The bill makes changes in the following areas of law:

  • Ohio Teacher Evaluation System
    • Student academic growth
    • Additional features of OTES
    • Frequency of evaluations
    • Professional growth plans
    • Formal observations of teachers
    • Alternative framework – repealed
  • Educator license grade bands
  • Teacher employment for any subject area or grade level
  • Educational aide permits and educational paraprofessional licenses
    • Individuals required to hold a permit or license
  • Nonteaching employee contracts
  • Educator licenses for substitute teaching
  • Professional development for certain gifted services providers
  • State achievement assessments
    • Paper and online administration of certain state assessments
    • Analysis and assistance
  • Kindergarten readiness diagnostic assessment eliminated
    • Effect on the Third-Grade Reading Guarantee
  • College Credit Plus
    • Comparable course delivery
    • Textbooks
    • Study on results and cost-effectiveness
    • Background on CCP
  • Excessively absent students
    • Background on student attendance
  • Special education preschool staffing
  • Reading improvement plans
  • Reporting of student performance
  • School mandate reports

Continue reading on our website.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

The legislature was not in session during the week of Thanksgiving, however the following is a status recap of select education-related legislation provided by OAAE Consultant Joan Platz.

House Bills

HB58 (Brenner, Slaby) Cursive Handwriting Instruction:  To require instruction in cursive handwriting.

Status: Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee – Reported out.

HB102 (Brenner) School Funding Reform:  To replace locally levied school district property taxes with a statewide property tax and require recipients of certain tax exemptions to reimburse the state for such levy revenue lost due to those exemptions; among many other measures.

Status: House Finance Committee

HB108 (Hagan, McColley) Informed Student Document:  To require one-half unit of financial literacy in the high school curriculum, to require the Chancellor of Higher Education to prepare an informed student document for each institution of higher education, among other measures.

Status: House Education & Career Readiness Committee

HB170 (Carfagna, Duffey) Computer Science Education:  To require academic content standards and curriculum requirements for computer science; to revise educator qualifications regarding computer science; and to authorize public schools to establish computer science and technology funds.

Status: (Passed by House) Senate Education Committee – Reported out as amended

HB200 (Koehler) Opportunity Scholarship Program:  To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

Status: House Education & Career Readiness Committee

HB21 (Hambley) Community School Enrollment Verification:  Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

Status:  House Education & Career Readiness Committee

HB235 (Gavarone) Legislative Approval of Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Act Plan.

Status:  Approved by the House.  Senate Education Committee

Senate Bills

SB8 (Gardner, Terhar) School Infrastructure and Technology:  To require the Ohio School Facilities Commission to establish a program assisting school districts in purchasing technology and making physical alterations to improve technology infrastructure and school safety and security.

Status: (Passed by Senate) Passed by House as amended on Floor, Vote 97-0; Senate refused to concur with House amendments. Conference Committee

SB39 (Schiavoni) Community School Operations:  Regarding community school operator contracts, the operation of Internet- and computer-based community schools, and performance metrics for blended learning schools.

Status: Senate Education Committee

SB82 (Williams, Lehner) School Absences-Parental Notification:  To require a public school to place a telephone call within one hour of the start of the school day to a parent whose child is absent without legitimate excuse.

Status: Senate Education Committee

SB85 (Huffman) Opportunity Scholarship Program Creation: To eliminate the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and to create the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

Status: Senate Education Committee

SB175 (Schiavoni) Recovered Funds-School Audit Regarding public moneys returned to the state as a result of a finding for recovery issued pursuant to an audit of a community school.

Status: Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee

SB216 (Huffman) Public School Deregulation Act: Regarding the administration of preschool and primary and secondary education programs.

Status: Senate Education Committee

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, November 28
4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121
Education and Career Readiness: Chair: Brenner

Presentation by State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria on Science, Social Studies, and Financial Literacy Revised Standards
HB21 (Hambley) 5th Hearing, All Testimony
Verify community school enrollments
HB200 (Koehler) 8th Hearing, All Testimony
Create Opportunity Scholarship Program

Wednesday, November 29
3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse South Hearing Room
Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

Presentation from State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria on Ohio’s revised standards

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

PBS: Education Department considers narrowing civil rights work

“The Education Department wants to narrow the scope of civil rights investigations at schools, focusing on individual complaints rather than systemic problems, according to a document obtained by The Associated Press.  Under the Obama administration, when a student complained of discrimination in a particular class or school, the education agency would examine the case but also look at whether the incident was part of a broader, systemic problem that needs to be fixed.”

 

 

FYI ARTS

TeachArtsOhioOAC_full-color-cmyk-logo 2016

The application for the Ohio Arts Council’s newest arts learning program, TeachArtsOhio, is now open. The deadline to apply is February 1, 2018.

TeachArtsOhio’s goal is to expand learning opportunities through the arts and increase academic achievement across the state.

Through TeachArtsOhio, the Ohio Arts Council will provide funding to support professional teaching artists to teach in schools and classrooms for up to the full 2018-19 school year at no cost to the school district. 100 percent of the artist fees are paid for using Ohio Arts Council funds, alleviating financial burdens from school and district budgets. No cash match is required.

Teaching artists will work with school faculty and staff to bring their education communities together with teaching artists to share engaging, personal, high-quality arts learning experiences.

The Ohio Arts Council’s Arts Learning staff welcomes the opportunity to attend meetings or events in your area to share information about the new TeachArtsOhio program and answer any questions.

The application deadline is February 1, 2018. For more information about the program and how to apply, visit oac.ohio.gov.

 

Creative Ohio: Healthy Communities

There’s still time to register for Creative Ohio: Healthy Communities on December 4! The event features presentations on:

  • How to Build Quality Proposals & Healthy Fund Development
  • Healthy Schools
  • Art Therapy for Substance Abuse
  • Columbus Culture Walks & Public Health
  • Advocacy
  • Transit Arts
  • Public Art Working with Municipalities
  • Healthy Creative Place-making in our Downtowns
  • Capital Appropriations

Artists-in-Schools member Robert Post and Dr. E. Gorden Gee are the featured keynote speakers. Register online.

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Sing Me A Story

The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for PK-1 teachers on Wednesday, November 29. Deborah Sunya Moore, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “Sing Me A Story” from 4:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center. Participants will be led through several lesson plans that explore elements of music within the text of a book such as steady beat and musical forms such as echo, call & response, and verse-chorus. Email Debbie Stoler at Tri-County ESC to register. The event flyer is available online.

Location: Tri-County ESC, Wooster
Date: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Time: 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.

 

Chance to Dance

monentum-excellenceMomentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.

These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and Ohio Dance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.

The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details. 

Autism/ Sensory Sensitivities
Date: November 13, 2017
Presenter: Andrew Palermo, Founder of Creatively Abled

Physical Disabilities
Date: January 12, 2018
Presenters: Mary Verdi Fletcher, Founder and Sara Lawrence Sucato, Touring Manager, Dancing Wheels

Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute

 
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference

OMEA_logoThe Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference.

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference:  http://files.constantcontact.com/4f0fafd9001/1f361256-90b5-42f4-8ef4-e670726bbf63.pdf

Renew your OAAE membership: http://www.oaae.net/index.php/en/about-us/join-the-oaae-online

 

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

PD logoHigh-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching
staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
http://www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:

Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: http://summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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