ESSA Update for Ohio’s Arts Educators

The Ohio Department of Education wants public input on their plans for ESSA implementation. We need arts educators to get involved!

From the Ohio Department of Education:

Every Student Succeeds Act Webinars and Proposed Stakeholder Meetings

To receive updates on ESSA when they are posted,  Sign up and select Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) from the dropdown list. Send your questions to essa@education.ohio.gov.

Under the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), Ohio will create a plan for how our local, state and federal programs are aligned to help all of our students be successful. The Ohio Department of Education will be seeking your involvement at a series of meetings throughout the state. Everyone is welcome to attend and share their ideas. Please join us at a meeting near you. Additionally, the department will host a series of webinars covering focus areas within ESSA . Participants can learn more about specific topics and share their thoughts through a variety of response options. The Ohio Department of Education is committed to comprehensive and collaborative community engagement leading to the development of our state Student Success Plan. A plan that is deeply rooted in the needs of Ohio’s students, educators and communities requires everyone’s input.

ESSA WEBINARS
All webinars will be recorded and posted below for viewing

Minimum subgroup (N) size for accountability purposes | Watch the webinar | Topic Discussion Guide
July 27 | 1:30 p.m.
State Assessments using nationally-recognized high school assessments (ACT/SAT) | Watch the webinar | Topic Discussion Guide Aug. 3 | 3:30 p.m.
Nonacademic/quality report card indicator | Watch the webinar | Topic Discussion Guide Aug. 10 | 9:30 a.m.
Highly Qualified Teacher (HQT) status transition | Register Aug. 17 | 4 p.m.
Guaranteeing equitable access to effective teachers using the State Equity Plan | Register Aug. 24 | 4 p.m.
Students who are homeless/McKinney-Vento Act | Register Aug. 25 | 3 p.m.
English Learner report card indicator | Register Aug. 31 | 4 p.m.
Report Card summative rating, disaggregation requirements, required report card indicators Sept. 9 | 4 p.m.
Federal funding options and flexibilities Sept.16 | 10 a.m.
Academic content standards’ review process Sept. 23 | 3:30 p.m.
School improvement overview Sept. 30 | 3 p.m.
Students in the foster care system TBD

ESSA STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS

Columbus King Arts Complex
Nicholson Auditorium
867 Mount Vernon Ave.
Columbus, OH 43203
Aug. 31 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Akron The University of Akron
Grand Station at Quaker Station
135 S. Broadway
Akron, OH 44308
Sept. 7 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Dayton Montgomery County ESC
200 South Keowee St.
Dayton, Ohio 45402-2242
Sept. 8 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Bucyrus The Loft at Pickwick Place
1875 N Sandusky Ave.
Bucyrus, OH 44820
Sept. 14 | 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Register
Toledo
The Toledo Club
Centennial Room, 1st Floor
235 14th St.
Toledo, OH  43604
Sept. 15 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Greater
Cleveland
Cuyahoga Community College’s Jerry Sue Thorton Center
2500 E 22nd St.
Cleveland, OH 44115
Sept. 19 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Lorain County Lorain County Community College
Ben & Jane Norton Culinary Arts Center
1005 N Abbe Rd.
Elyria, OH 44035
Sept. 28 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Cincinnati Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency
Gwen L. Robinson Conference Hall
1740 Langdon Farm Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45237
Sept. 29 | 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Register
Cambridge Zane State College
EPIC Center
9900 Brick Church Rd.
Cambridge, OH 43725
Oct. 5 | 6-8 p.m.
Register
Portsmouth South Central Ohio ESC
522 Glenwood Ave.
New Boston, OH 45662
Oct. 6 | 6-8 p.m.
Register

 

 

 

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OAAE to present at 2016 OAEA Conference

We hope to see many of you at the Ohio Art Education Association’s annual professional development conference this year. OAAE Executive Director Tim Katz will take part in the State of the Arts Panel on Thursday, November 3.

Conference registration opens August 15. Be sure to plan ahead and secure approval from your administrator. See you then!

OAEA conference 2016

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Congratulations to our new grantees!

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education has awarded seven community organizations a total of $5,350 during the most recent round of the Franklin County Neighborhood Arts program. Funded projects will serve a diverse array of communities across Franklin County.

The Franklin County Neighborhood Arts program supports neighborhood and community groups with public arts projects in all disciplines. The purpose of the Franklin County Neighborhood Arts program is to increase community participation in the arts throughout Franklin County. Grants are awarded three times a year. The following is a list of organizations and grant amounts awarded during the second round of funding this year.

Capriccio Columbus – $1,000
Handel’s Messiah
All-brass arrangement of Handel’s orchestral piece, presented in collaboration with the Brass Band of Columbus.

Duxberry Park Arts IMPACT Elementary School – $700
Community Cardboard Challenge
Annual event celebratning child creativity and the role communities can play in fostering it.

Ethiopian Tewahedo Social Services – $1,000
New American Festival
This festival fills a cultural need for refugee, immigrant, and asylee communities. The event provides an opportunity to share participants’ rich cultures with family, friends, and the larger community.

Genesis of Good Samaritans Ministries – $400
Faith United Against Violence Gospel Arts Festival
One-day event bringing together a diverse community in a celebration of love, peace, and unity.

Kate Schulte Foundation – $750
2016 5th Annual Hot Times Kate Schulte Tribute
Series of concerts and workshops at local jazz venues, culminating with a final performance on the main stage of the annual Hot Times Festival.

Ohio Art League – $750
Thumb Box Exhibition
An annual event dating back to 1916, the exhibition provides an inclusive forum that breaks barriers for artists and collectors. All member artists of all levels have the opportunity to exhibit, sell work, and connect through the Thumb Box show.

Sacred Music LLC – $750
Raag-Taal: Indian Performing Arts Workshop and Concert
A two-day event exploring classical, folk and contemporary music, dance and storytelling from South Asia.

 

The next grant deadline is October 31, 2016. Visit OAAE’s website for more information.

 

 

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Arts on Line Education Update June 27, 2016

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
June 27, 2016
Joan Platz

 

The Arts on Line Education Update will take a break over the summer.  The next issue will be published in September 2016.  Have a great summer!!

 

LEGISLATIVE REPORT

131st General Assembly:  The Ohio House and Senate are on break.

 

AG Rejects Proposed School Prayer CA: Attorney General (AG) Mike DeWine announced on June 22, 2016 that he had rejected a proposed constitutional amendment entitled “Amendment to Return Prayer to our Public Schools”, based on a technicality.

The amendment would allow Ohio school children the right to pray, and/or acknowledge, their religious beliefs in school.  The amendment was submitted to the AG’s office by the Coalition to Return Prayer to Our Public Schools on June 15, 2016.  The proposed amendment also requires all public schools to display the Bill of Rights of the U.S. Constitution, and states that the right of Ohio citizens to express their religious beliefs shall not be infringed upon.

The AG explained in a statement that both the language of the proposed amendment and its proposed summary are required to be on the part-petitions circulated to electors, but these parts were not included on the petitions submitted.

See http://www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov/getattachment/f08cc8af-ff57-47e7-ad86-f083f08a3edf/Amendment-to-Return-Prayer-to-Our-Public-Schools.aspx

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Education Secretary Defends Proposed ESSA Rules: The House Education and Workforce Committee, chaired by Representative John Kline, held a hearing on June 23, 2016 about the rules drafted by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

U.S. Secretary of Education, John B. King, Jr., and others testified about the draft rules for spending and accountability.

According to a press release about the hearing, committee members, including Chairman Kline, are concerned that the USDOE is proposing rules that go beyond the intent of the law.

The chairman identified three concerns in his opening remarks:

  • The committee that the USDOE assembled to participate in the negotiated rulemaking process lacked diversity and representation from rural areas, and seemed to be stacked to achieve the preferred outcomes of the USDOE.
  • The draft spending rules (supplement, not supplant) do not align with the law.  According to Chairman Kline, “Last year, Congress decided the rule would be enforced equally across all schools. Now, school districts must simply show that funds are distributed fairly without prescribing a specific approach or outcome. The law explicitly prohibits the secretary from interfering, yet that is precisely what your proposal would do.”
  • The draft accountability rules would interfere with how states compare school performance and identify schools for intervention, leading to more schools being identified for intervention.

Cassie Harrelson, a secondary math teacher from Colorado, testified before the committee, and questioned the “extensive areas dictated under the proposed federal regulations.” She said that she was disappointed in the proposed rules, that continued to focus on standardized testing and student outcomes, rather than “…closing the critical opportunity gaps that exist in so many of our schools.”

Also testifying were Stephen Pruitt, the Education Commissioner of Kentucky and David Schuler, the Superintendent of Arlington Heights School District in Illinois and president of the AASA.  They both objected to the proposed requirement that state accountability systems award a single summative grade for schools, rather than allow a broader view of school performance.

Superintendent Pruitt told the committee that the draft regulations are too complex and “contain so many restrictions and requirements that state choices remain severely limited.”

In response to questions from the committee, Secretary of Education John B. King explained that the rules provide states with the flexibility to develop their own strategies to improve schools, and there is no intent to identify more schools for intervention.

On spending, Secretary King defended the department’s efforts to focus attention on intra-district disparities in funding, services, and programs.  He said that in some school districts students in wealthier schools have more course options, teachers, counselors, etc. than poorer schools, and this translates into “real differences in students’ experiences.”

See http://edworkforce.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=400887

See “Education Secretary Defends Draft ESSA Accountability, Spending Rules,” by Andrew Ujifusa, Education Week, June 23, 2016 at

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/king_defends_essa_accountability_plan_house.html

 

More Feedback on ESSA Rules: The Congressional Tri-Caucus, composed of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, the Congressional Black Caucus, and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, submitted letters to U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr. on June 23, 2016 regarding the draft rules for accountability and spending under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Overall the Tri-Caucus believes that ESSA is a civil rights law, and the rules should support the right of all students to a high quality education.  Congress approved the original law ,which is known as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), in 1965, and reauthorized the law in 2015 as the Every Student Succeeds Act.

The organizations say that they are pleased with the proposed rules for accountability, because they ensure that parents and local communities are involved in ESSA’s development and implementation; prohibit the use of super-subgroups, which will ensure that districts are accountable for meeting the needs of all students; require states to take action in low-performing schools; and require that states hold schools responsible for testing 95 percent of students.

The Tri-Caucus also requested that the USDOE take this opportunity through the rules “…to avail itself of every tool at its disposal to mitigate [these] inequities such that students living in poverty are not further short-changed by attending under-resourced schools.  These tools include providing clear regulations and guidance, coupled with robust oversight, to give meaning to ESSA’s supplement, not supplant provision.

See “Education Secretary Defends Draft ESSA Accountability, Spending Rules,” by Andrew Ujifusa, Education Week, June 23, 2016 at

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/king_defends_essa_accountability_plan_house.html

 

What is “Good Stakeholder Engagement”?  The Learning First Alliance (LFA), a partnership of organizations representing the education community, has published draft guidelines about what constitutes “good stakeholder engagement” to support the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

As Ohio’s process to implement ESSA continues, these guidelines could be used as a standard to assess how well the Ohio Department of Education engages stakeholders in developing ESSA plans.

According to the guidelines, ESSA requires that states involve stakeholders, such as political leaders, education leaders, parents, educators, and other constituencies, in the development of policies to implement ESSA.

But in reviewing state efforts at stakeholder engagement, the LFA has found “a critical missing element:  the understanding that the consultative process is not simply about sharing information.  Rather, it is about acknowledging that the education decision-making done at each level of government now needs to be performed as a collaborative process.”

Accordingly, the LFA recommends that stakeholders should be meaningfully engaged in all stages of the consultative process to ensure that state ESSA plans and policies “reflect a shared vision” for education, and also “…minimize the continuous chaos caused by changes in leadership at the federal, state, and local levels that result in many new initiatives to be rolled out with each new leader.”

ESSA specifically calls for stakeholder involvement in the development of State Title I Plans, Local Educational Agency Title I Plans, Local Flexibility Demonstration Agreement, Title II Local Applications, State and Specially Qualified Title III Plans, Title III Local Plans, Local Title IV Part A Applications, State Title IV Part B Applications.

The LFA principles to guide stakeholder engagement recommend that stakeholders include those named in the law and under-represented groups or unique populations that could bring a recognized expertise to the discussions.

Stakeholders should be convened initially to design the consultative process and identify the desired outcomes. In these discussion the focus should be to set goals “….to ensure that each child has access to an effective education.”

The consultative process should include stakeholder participation at all stages of the process, including development, implementation, evaluation, and revision of the plans and policies.

The stakeholder consultative process should be transparent and open to the public, which includes making sure that the public has access to materials, drafts, and how to provide feedback.

According to the guidelines, the bottom-line is that the stakeholder consultative process is not “…just an advisory process where interested parties are asked their views, with one party deciding what information will be used from the discussion.”

The Learning First Alliance is a partnership of leading education organizations “dedicated to improving student learning in America’s public schools.” Alliance members include: American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education; AASA: The School Superintendents Association; American Federation of Teachers; American School Counselor Association; Consortium for School Networking; International Society for Technology in Education; Learning Forward; National Association of Elementary School Principals; National Association of Secondary School Principals; National Education Association; National PTA; National School Boards Association; National School Public Relations Association; and Phi Delta Kappa International.

See http://www.learningfirst.org/sites/default/files/assets/LFAStakeholderEngagementPrinciples.pdf

 

OHIO NEWS

Straight A Grants Announced: The Straight A Governing Board announced on June 20, 2016 the recipients of the latest round of Straight A Fund Grants.  A total of 23 grants, worth $14.8 million, will be awarded to 90 schools, out of a total of 141 grant applications.

The Straight A Fund was created in 2013 to support innovative education programs that improve student achievement, increase efficiency, and are sustainable.  The state budget included $30 million for the grant program this biennium.

The Beavercreek City Schools was awarded three separate grants, one for a project entitled, “The Museum School:  Where Students Examine, Experiment, and Exhibit.” This project will immerse students in innovative, museum pedagogy to foster imagination and help students develop 21st century skills.

The grant recommendations are not official until approved by the Ohio Controlling Board on August, 8, 2016.

A list of the grant recipients is available at http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Media/Media-Releases/90-Ohio-Schools-Recommended-to-Receive-Straight-A/Straight-A-Fund-FY17-Summary-Page.pdf.aspx

 

How Much and Where Are Ohio’s Schools Spending Money? Patrick O’Donnell at The Plain Dealer analyzed 2014-15 data on school spending from the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) last week in a series of articles. The analysis examines how much schools pay school staff and the cost of educating students in special education classes, English language learners, and students who are poor.

He found that the statewide average spending per student is between $10,000-11,000, but 23 out of 30 school districts in Cuyahoga County spend more than $12,000 per student.  Five school districts in Cuyahoga County — Orange, Beachwood, Cleveland Heights-University Heights, Warrensville, and East Cleveland — spend over $19,000 per student, and are the top spending school districts in the state.

He also compared the amount of money Ohio’s schools spend per student and average salary levels for teachers to national averages compiled by the National Education Association (NEA) in its annual Rankings of the States and Estimates of School Statistics. According to that report, Ohio ranks 8th in average daily attendance with more than 1.6 million students, and has a student to teacher ratio of 17.2 students for every teacher, ranking it 9th lowest in the nation.

In comparing teacher pay, Ohio ranks 21st among the states, paying on average $56,172 compared to New York at $77,628, and South Dakota, at $40,934.

But Ohio ranks 35th in the average amount of revenue available per student at $11,436.  Vermont, Rhode Island, Wyoming, Alaska, Delaware, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania have over $20,000 in revenue available per student, compared to the lowest level of $7,320 per student in Nevada.

See “What school districts spend the most money?  See rankings here,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 20, 2016 at

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/what_school_districts_spend_the_most_money_see_rankings_here.html

See “Which schools pay the most to handle student disabilities, poverty and English Language Learners? Rankings here,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 23, 2016 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/which_schools_pay_the_most_to_handle_student_disabilities_poverty_and_english_language_learners_rankings_here.html

See “What do schools pay bus drivers, lunch workers and others that work with your kids? Details here,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 22, 2016, at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/what_do_schools_pay_bus_driver.html

See “What schools pay teachers the most? See rankings here,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 21, 2016 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/what_schools_pay_teachers_the_most_see_rankings_here.html

See “How does Ohio’s school spending compare to other states? See enrollment, teacher pay and revenue rankings here,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 24, 2016 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/how_does_ohios_school_spending_compare_to_other_states_see_enrollment_teacher_pay_and_revenue_rankings_here.html

 

DOPR Committee Meets: The Dropout Prevention and Recovery Study Committee met on June 22, 2016 and received presentations from Buddy Harris, director of the Office of Innovation at the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), and John Gailer, assistant director of the National Dropout Recovery Center at Clemson University.

The committee was created in 131-House Bill 2 (Dovilla-Roegner Charter School Accountability), to develop a definition for “quality” drop-out prevention and recovery community schools (DOPR), and determine how these schools should be funded.  The recommendations are due to the legislature by August 1, 2016.

There were 93 DOPR charter schools in Ohio in 2014-15 school year.  DOPR schools primarily serve students who are between 16 and 22 years of age, and have dropped out of high school, or are at risk of dropping out of high school due to poor attendance, disciplinary problems, or suspensions.

Committee members include Stephen Lyons of the Columbus Partnership; Monique Hamilton, Superintendent of Cruiser Academy, a dropout prevention and recovery school; Alex Johnson, President of Cuyahoga Community College; Senator Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering); Michael Drake, President of The Ohio State University; Representative Andrew Brenner; Eric Gordon, CEO of the Cleveland Municipal School District, and Buddy Harris, head of the Ohio Department of Education’s Office of Innovation.

For general questions about the meeting, contact Buddy Harris at the Ohio Department of Education at (614) 728-7731.

 

REPORTS

2016 Kids Count Report Released:  The Annie E. Casey Foundation released its annual Kids Count Data Book on June 21, 2016.   The report ranks states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C. according to the well-being of children.  With this information advocates and policy makers can make informed decisions about strategies to improve the lives of children.

Overall this Kids Count reports found that “today’s youth — Generation Z– are healthier and completing high school on time despite mounting economic inequity and increasingly unaffordable college tuition.”

The Data Book shows how children are doing in four key domains — economic well-being, education, health, and family and community — based on 16 indicators.

States with the highest overall rankings are Minnesota, Massachusetts, Iowa, New Hampshire, and Connecticut.  The lowest ranking states are Mississippi, New Mexico, Louisiana, Nevada, and Alabama.

The nation as a whole improved on 10 indicators, worsened on 5 indicators, and there was no change in one of the indicators.

Ohio’s overall rank is 26th.  Ohio ranked 25th in the economic well being of children; 17th in education; 19th in health; and 30th in family and community.

In examining how Ohio performed on the indicators, Ohio improved on 11 indicators, worsened performance on 4 indicators, and there was no change on one indicator.  Here is a breakdown of how Ohio performed on the indicators:

Economic-well being:

  • Children in poverty – 24 percent – worsened
  • Children whose parents lack secure employment – 32 percent – worsened
  • Children living in households with a high housing cost burden – 31 percent – improved
  • Teens not in school and not working – 7 percent – unchanged.

Education:

  • Children not attending preschool 2010-12 – 56 percent – improved
  • Fourth graders not proficient in reading 2013 – 63 percent – improved
  • Eighth graders not proficient in math 2013 – 60 percent – improved
  • High school students not graduating on time -16 percent – improved

Health:

  • Low birth weight babies – 8.6 percent – improved
  • Children without health insurance – 5 percent – improved
  • Children and teen deaths per 100,000 – 25 – improved
  • Teens who abuse alcohol or drugs – 6 percent – improved

Family and Community:

  • Children in single-parent families – 37 percent – worsened
  • Children in families where the household head lacks a high school diploma -10 percent – improved
  • Children living in high poverty areas -14 percent – worsened
  • Teen births per 1,000 – 30 – improved

See http://www.aecf.org/m/databook/2014KC_profile_OH.pdf

 

Study Shows that Expectations Have Changed for Kindergarten:  Researchers from The University of Virginia found that the kindergarten curriculum has become increasingly like first grade by comparing results from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study in 1998 and 2010.

The Longitudinal Study showed that teachers in 2010 had higher expectations for kindergarten students compared to teachers in 1998.  Teachers in 2010 reported that they expected that children know the alphabet and how to use a pencil before beginning kindergarten, and that children should know how to read when they leave kindergarten.  Thirty-one percent of teachers in 1998 believed that their students should learn to read in kindergarten, compared to eighty percent in 2010.

Instructional time for reading and math also increased in kindergarten between 1998 and 2010.  As a result the researchers found that time spent teaching the arts substantially decreased by 18 percent in music and 16 percent for visual art.

The researchers also found that more teachers reported using standardized tests to evaluate students, and testing was more pronounced at schools that serve predominantly low-income and minority students.

According to the study, the researchers were surprised to see “…how drastic the changes have been over a short period of time.”

See “Is Kindergarten the New First Grade?” by Daphna Bassok (University of Virginia), Scott Latham (University of Virginia), Anna Rorem (University of Virginia), AERA Study Snapshot, January 6, 2016.

http://www.aera.net/Newsroom/News-Releases-and-Statements/Study-Snapshot-Is-Kindergarten-the-New-First-Grade/Is-Kindergarten-the-New-First-Grade

 

FYI ARTS

The Challenges of Being a Teaching Artist: Paulette Beete examines the challenges and benefits of being a teaching artist in the latest issue of the NEA Arts, (National Endowment for the Arts).

According to the article, being a “teaching artist” is a creatively fulfilling profession, which touches the lives of children and adults, and makes significant contributions to communities.

Teaching artists fulfill a number of important positions, such as teaching at local arts organizations, schools, prisons, and corporations; teaching as adjunct professors in fine arts departments; and providing professional development workshops for other artists and arts educators.

Sometimes teaching artists are lucky enough to have full-time steady positions, but most of the time teaching is just part of, or complementary to, their own art practice, meaning that many teaching artists are juggling several part-time jobs to keep financially solvent, and have no health insurance, paid vacations, and no guarantee that they will have a job each year.

The article focuses in on the careers of two teaching artists, Deb Norton, a dance instructor in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and Dan Crane, a theater instructor and actor in Washington, D.C.  Both have experienced job insecurity, because they have pieced-together part-time jobs supported by grants and community resources that are not permanent. And, both describe hectic schedules that change from day to day, and often stretch into over 40 hours a week.

Because of the uncertainties of the profession, the long hours, and poor working conditions, many talented teaching artists ultimately leave the profession, which is a loss for both students, arts educators, and communities.

The executive director of the Association of Teaching Artists, Dale Davis, identifies in the article some of the professional issues that should be addressed to support teaching artists as a profession.  These include an infrastructure to publicly acknowledge the contributions of teaching artists to education and communities; a set of credentials or standards for teaching artist; and a pay scale based on training and experience.

See “The Challenges of Being a Teaching Artist” by Paulette Beete, NEA, Arts Number 2, 2016 at https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/nea_arts/NEA_Arts_2_2016_FINAL.pdf

 


This update is written weekly by Joan Platz, Research and Knowledge Director for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

The purpose of the update is to keep arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association , Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre AssociationOhioDance, and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

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Arts on Line Education Update June 20, 2016

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
June 20, 2016
Joan Platz

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

131st General Assembly: The Ohio House and Senate are on break, but some committees are meeting this week:

The 2020 Tax Policy Study Commission, cochaired by Representative Jeff McClain and Senator Bob Peterson, will meet on June 20, 2016 at 10:00 AM in the South Hearing Room.  The commission will receive testimony on tax policies and the Historic Preservation Tax Credit.

The commission was created in HB64 (Smith) Biennial Budget, and its members include Tim Keen, director of the Office of Budget and Management, and Representatives Kirk Schuring (R-Canton) and Jack Cera (D-Bellaire), and Senators Scott Oelslager (R-Canton) and Charleta Tavares (D-Columbus).

The commission is directed to develop recommendations regarding Ohio’s severance tax, historic rehabilitation tax credit program, personal income tax, and tax credit program.

-The Dropout Prevention and Recovery Study Committee will meet on June 22 at 3:00 PM at the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

The committee will develop a definition for “quality” drop-out recovery community schools, and discuss how these schools should be funded.  These schools primarily serve students who are between 16 and 22 years of age and have dropped out of high school, or are at risk of dropping out of high school, due to poor attendance, disciplinary problems, or suspensions.

For general questions about the meeting, contact Buddy Harris at the Ohio Department of Education at (614) 728-7731.

 

JEOC Selects Executive Director: The Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC), chaired by Senator Hite, met on June 15, 2016.  The committee announced the selection of Dr. Lauren Monowar-Jones as its executive director.  Dr. Monwar-Jones is currently the assistant director of curriculum and assessment in the Ohio Department of Education’s Office of Early Learning and School Readiness.

 

Governor Kasich Vetoes Bill About Polling Hours: Governor John Kasich vetoed on June 17, 2016 Substitute SB296 (Seitz) Polling Place-Extended Hours.  The bill prescribes certain conditions for keeping polls open on election day after 7:30 PM, and includes the requirement that petitioners who are seeking an injunction in the courts to keep the polls open post a bond to cover the cost for extending the election.

The bill was introduced by Senator Bill Seitz in response to incidents in which judges extended voting hours in polling places in southwest Ohio against the advice of Secretary of State Jon Husted. According to Senator Seitz and others, ordering certain polling places to stay open, could provide an unfair advantage to candidates in races involving multiple jurisdictions, and is not warranted, because Ohio has some of the most liberal voting laws in the country.  Voters have the opportunity to vote absentee and before the election as well.

The governor agreed with the conditions included in the bill to determine whether or not polls should be kept open due to an extenuating circumstance, but disagreed with a section of the bill requiring that petitioners post a bond, saying that the bill impinges on the discretion of judges, who already have the authority to set or waive bond requirements.

According to the veto statement, “Prohibiting state court judges from exercising their discretion to waive the bond requirement in only these types of cases is inequitable and might deter persons from seeking an injunction to allow after-hours voting when there may be a valid reason for doing so.”

The bill was approved in the Ohio Senate by a vote of 23 to 9 and in the Ohio House by a vote of 64 to 32.  The bill was opposed by most Democrats, who equated the bond requirement with a poll tax, and believed that the bond would discourage petitioners from requesting that polls stay open for legitimate reasons.

See http://www.governor.ohio.gov/Portals/0/pdf/vetoes/!!!!SB296%20Veto%20Message.pdf

 

More Changes at the Statehouse: State Representative Tim Brown (R-Bowling Green), who is serving in his second term, announced last week that he will resign from the 3rd Ohio House District seat in July 2016.   He has accepted a position as president of Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments.

 

Signed into Law: Governor Kasich signed into law last week the following bills:

  • SB63 (LaRose) Online Voter Registration: Creates an online voter registration system; requires the secretary of state annually to review the Statewide Voter Registration Database to identify registrants who are not United States citizens; modifies the procedures for maintaining the Statewide Voter Registration Database; amends the requirements for the certification of voting equipment; and clarifies the circumstances under which a political party may appoint a person to fill a vacancy in certain elective offices.
  • -HB50 (Pelanda-Grossman) Foster Care:  Extends the age for which a person is eligible for federal foster care and adoption assistance payments under Title IV-E to age 21; requires that a guardian receive the Ohio Guardianship Guide; and aligns Ohio law to federal Title IV-E program requirements.
  •  HB113 (Grossman-Manning) CPR Training:  Requires public schools to provide students with instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the use of an automated external defibrillator; requires training for certain school employees in the use of an automated external defibrillator; revises the law regarding the Joint Education Oversight Committee; and increases the number of high school equivalency exams that students can take to qualify for a high school equivalency diploma.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Federal Appropriations Measures Advance: The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee, Senator Thad Cochran chair, approved on June 16, 2016 the FY2017 Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations bill, S.3068.

The bill slightly increases funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and Humanities (NEH) to $148 million, an increase of $500,000, and increases funding for the Smithsonian Institutions to $860.2 million, an increase of $20 million.

The proposed funding levels for the NEA and NEH are less than President Obama’s request, and less than a proposal approved by the House Committee on Appropriations on June 15, 2016.  The House bill increases funding by almost $2 million for the NEA and NEH to $149.8 million; provides $863 million for the Smithsonian Institutions; and $36.4 million for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

The House proposal also includes support for integrating arts education with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEAM), and “….encourages the NEA to continue engaging cultural institutions and arts organizations in supporting arts education as a valued educational component necessary to nurture the next generation of leaders and prepare young Americans for the 21st century economy.”

 

Houston District Fails to Renew EVAAS: The cash strapped Houston Independent School District (HISD) board of education failed on June 9, 2016 to secure enough votes to renew a contract with the SAS Institute, which provides value added model scores (VAM) to the school district using the Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS).  The 3-3 tie vote blocks payment of $680,000 to the SAS Institute.

The HISD has used the VAM scores to make high stakes decisions about teachers, including bonuses and termination, contrary to the April 2014 recommendations of the American Statistical Association.

Seven Houston teachers filed a lawsuit in 2014 in federal court opposing the district’s use of EVAAS in teacher evaluations. The lawsuit is Houston Federation of Teachers, et al. v. Houston ISD.

See “How should we grade teachers?” by Sarah Becker, Houston Chronicle, Letter to the Editor, May 12, 2016 at http://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/gray-matters/article/How-should-we-rate-teachers-7462948.php

See https://www.facebook.com/hft2415/?fref=photo

See http://www.amstat.org/policy/pdfs/asa_vam_statement.pdf

 

More on VAMs: Professor Steven J. Klees from the University of Maryland writes in the May 2016 issue of the Educational Researcher that VAMs are “Never ‘Accurate, Reliable, and Valid.’”

He responds to the conclusion of a statement about the use of value-added models (VAMs) by the American Statistical Association in 2014.  The Statement warns about using VAMs to make high stakes decisions about students, schools, and teachers, because it is very difficult to “isolate the contributions of teachers and leaders to student learning.”

Professor Klees believes that it is more than “difficult” to isolate the contributions of teachers to student learning, writing that “it is impossible –even if all the technical requirements in the Statement are met.”

He writes, “For proper specification of any form of regression analysis, three conditions must hold: All confounding variables must be in the equation, all must be measured correctly, and the correct functional form must be used.”

He then describes why researchers “never even come close” to meeting the conditions, because, “Literally, dozens, perhaps hundreds, of variables may be relevant to explaining student gain score variations; we have multiple, competing measures for most; and we have no idea of the proper functional interrelationships.”

Adding relevant variables or changing how variables are measured in a VAM model will “always lead to significant differences in the rank ordering of teachers’ and principals’ contributions.”

He concludes, “The bottom line is that regardless of technical sophistication, the use of VAM is never “accurate, reliable, and valid” and will never yield “rigorously supported inferences.”

See “VAMs Are Never “Accurate, Reliable, and Valid” by Steven J. Klees, Educational Researcher, May, 2016 http://edr.sagepub.com/content/45/4/267.full?ijkey=Ozv0.uo.t/JQM&keytype=ref&siteid=spedr

See the AERA Statement about VAM at http://edr.sagepub.com/content/44/8/448.full?ijkey=2a3e7aed37965b4a784f0c22c1acb25b8060ddd1&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

 

Who Speaks for ESSA? Alyson Klein writes for Education Week that U.S. Secretary of Education Dr. John B. King, Jr., Senator Lamar Alexander, and Representative John Kline offer different perspectives about the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in recent interviews.  Senator Alexander and Representative John Kline are the major Republican architects of the bi-partisan law that replaced the No Child Left Behind Act, and Dr. King, as head of the U.S. Department of Education, is developing rules to implement the law.

In an address to the National School Boards Association, Dr. King said that furthering equity for all students is a mainstay of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act now and in the past.  Equity includes ensuring that all students have access to quality education programs and courses, and ensuring that states and schools are held accountable for the progress of all groups of students, including students with special needs, English language learners, poor students, and minority students.

The draft spending rules developed by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) include controversial provisions that would require teacher salaries to be included in the formulas to determine equal spending between schools that receive federal funds for disadvantaged students.

The draft accountability rules are also controversial, because they include consequences for schools that fail to test 95 percent of students, even though the federal law does not prohibit states from allowing parents to opt students out of testing, and require states to produce a summative score to rate and rank schools and districts, which is not part of the law.

At the same meeting Senator Lamar Alexander told the NSBA audience that he is disappointed in the response by the USDOE, and believes that the draft rules for spending and accountability overreach the agency’s authority.

In a separate interview with Education Week, Representative John Kline also expressed his concern that the USDOE was overreaching its authority.  Under the accountability rules, Representative Kline questions the draft regulations that require state accountability systems to produce a summative score to rate and rank schools.  He also opposes the draft spending rules saying that the law is not being correctly interpreted through the rules.

See “Dueling Remarks on ESSA by Education Secretary, Key Republican Senator,” by Alyson Klein, Education Week, June 13, 2016

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/education_secretary_john_b_kin.html?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=campaignk-12

See “ESSA Architect Q&A: Rep. John Kline, R-Minn,”

by Alyson Klein, Education Week, June 13, 2016 at

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/essa_architect_q_a_rep_john_kl.html?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=campaignk-12

 

OHIO NEWS

More Charter Schools Closing this Year: According to Patrick O’Donnell at The Plain Dealer, the new evaluation system for charter school sponsors and a law passed to increase charter school accountability (HB2-Dovilla) might be making charter school sponsors more selective about the charter schools that they choose to sponsor.

The Ohio Department of Education reported that eight charter schools voluntarily closed this year and 11 charter schools are searching for new sponsors after being dropped by their current sponsor.  The schools were informed in January 2016 that their contracts with their current sponsors would not be renewed. Charter schools in Ohio need to have a sponsor, so it is expected that these schools will close after June 30, 2016.

HB2 included several changes in charter school law to strengthen accountability, including blocking poor performing charter schools from “sponsor hopping,” and allowing the ODE to refuse to sponsor a poor performing charter school.

See “Charters with poor records lack sponsors,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, June 18, 2016 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/poor_performing_charter_school.html.

 

Surveys Show Support for Ohio Public Schools: Surveys conducted by the Ohio Public School Advocacy Network (OPSAN) over the past months provide new insight about how Ohio citizens view student testing, teacher evaluation, charter school funding, local control, and state mandates.

The Ohio Public School Advocacy Network is a “….grass roots initiative to return local control to public schools in Ohio by providing their citizens with a stronger voice in shaping statewide education policy.” Superintendents from schools districts in southwest, central, northwest and northeast Ohio make-up the network.

The surveys were conducted in 18 Ohio counties, and over 6000 people responded.  The survey results were released on May 18, 2016, and show the following:

  • How are Ohio public schools doing?  The survey results show that the 65 percent of citizens believe their public schools are doing an excellent or good job preparing children for their future. While 37 percent believe that public education is getting worse, 54 percent believe that it is better or the same. When asked what letter grade they would give their local school district, 63 percent say an A or B.  Most respondents (65 percent compared to 32 percent) say that they feel connected to their public school.
  • Who should control the public schools?  Most respondents (61 percent) believe that locally elected boards of education should control public schools.  Eighty-eight percent believe that state regulations and mandates for public schools have increased over the past five years, and 67 percent oppose more government control of their schools.  Most of the respondents (64 percent) think that policy decisions made at the state level are not in the best interest of students, and 81 percent feel that the Ohio legislature should reduce education mandates and demands.
  • How should schools be evaluated?  Respondents selected high quality teachers (48 percent) and preparing students for college and the workplace (25 percent) as the top two indicators of school quality.  Only 12 percent rated state report cards as an indicator of quality.
  • What about testing? More than half of respondents (55 percent) believe that state testing has not helped students, and 73 percent believe that scores from standardized tests should not be used to evaluate teachers.
  • What about charter schools? Two out of three citizens (66 percent) do not want their locally approved tax dollars used to support for-profit charter schools, and 71 percent are opposed to using their tax dollars to pay for vouchers to support private schools.

See the survey results at http://corkyocallaghan.com/survey-report-shared/

 

REPORTS

Charter School Supporters Offer E-School Recommendations: The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (NAPCS), the National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NASCA), and the 50-State Campaign for Achievement Now released last week recommendations to improve the quality of online charter schools, sometimes referred to as e-schools or virtual schools.

The report is entitled “A Call to Action to Improve the Quality of Full-Time Virtual Charter Public Schools,” and targets Ohio, Pennsylvania, and California, which have the highest number of students attending virtual schools.  As of August 2014 there were 135 full-time virtual charter schools serving about 180,000 students in 23 states and the District of Columbia.

According to the report, the organizations support online learning options for parents, but find disturbing the poor performance of virtual schools.

“Unfortunately, the results clearly show that significant problems exist within this part of the charter school movement. Left unchecked, these problems have the potential to overshadow the positive impacts this model currently has on some students. We urge state leaders and authorizers to address these problems head on instead of turning a blind eye to them.”

The following are some of the recommendations to improve virtual schools in six policy areas: authorizing structure, enrollment criteria, enrollment levels, accountability for performance, funding levels based on costs, and performance-based funding.

  • Authorizers:  Authorizers (also known as sponsors) should close chronically low-performing full-time virtual charter schools using the current state laws.  “Authorizers have a legal and moral responsibility to close chronically low-performing charter schools of any kind, including full-time virtual charter schools.”
  • Authorizing Structure:  States should place some limits on authorizers of virtual schools based on appropriate criteria, and cap the amount of authorizing fees that an authorizer can withhold from a full-time virtual charter school.
  • Enrollment Criteria: States should consider establishing eligibility requirements for students who want to enroll in full-time virtual charter schools based on factors proven necessary for student success.
  • Enrollment Levels: States should require authorizers and schools to create desired enrollment levels for full-time virtual charter schools for each year of a charter contract; limit the number of students per school in any given year; and allow schools to grow – or not – based on performance.
  • Accountability for Performance: States should require authorizers and schools to jointly include additional, virtual-specific goals in the schools’ charter contracts, and make renewal and closure decisions based upon schools’ achievement of the goals in their contracts.
  • Funding Levels Based on Costs: States should determine appropriate levels of funding for full-time virtual charter schools, and charter school operators should propose and justify a price per student in their charter school applications.
  • Performance-Based Funding. States should also consider funding virtual charter school students via a performance-based funding system.

See “A Call to Action to Improve the Quality of Full-Time Virtual Charter Public,” The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools (NAPCS), the National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NASCA), and the 50-State Campaign for Achievement Now, June 2016 at Schools,”http://www.publiccharters.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/VirtualReport_Web614.pdf

 

Money Really Does Matter: The National Education Policy Center (NEPC) released on June 16, 2016 a policy brief entitled “Does Money Matter?” by William J. Mathis, University of Colorado Boulder.  The policy brief is part of NEPC’s series entitled Research-Based Options for Education Policymaking, a collection of mini-briefs focused on a wide-range of education topics with research-based recommendations.

In this policy brief Dr. Mathis considers the evidence used to support the claim that there is “no systemic relation between spending and school quality.”

A movement supporting this claim started in the 1980s and was supported by the work of Professor Eric Hanushek of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.  He published an influential study in 1986 that counted the number of research studies that concluded that “‘Variations in school expenditures are not systematically related to variations in student performance.’”

The results of this study were later challenged by researchers Hedges, Laine, and Greenwald, who redid Hanushek’s work, and, by eliminating studies that were poorly conducted, found “‘systematic positive relations between resource inputs and school outcomes.’”  Other researchers found that while specific results vary from place to place, such as gains in test scores, later earnings, and graduation rates, in general additional funds for K-12 education does matter, especially for economically deprived children.

But the popular claim that providing additional resources to schools would not increase student achievement provided policy makers with a convenient excuse to underfund K-12 education programs, which also happen to be one of the largest items in state budgets.

According to Dr. Mathis, “Underinvestment in schools has characterized Western countries since the beginning of public education and is the result of political decision-making, not a lack of resources or citizen support.”

In response to inadequate state support, and the growing imbalance between state and local support of schools, plaintiffs for public schools filed 44 school funding lawsuits in state and federal courts starting in the 1990s. One of the many pro-plaintiff decisions at the time was written by North Carolina Superior Court Justice Howard Manning in Hoke County Board of Education v. State of North Carolina.  He wrote in the 2000 decision that “Only a fool would find that money does not matter in education.”

As a result of many court decisions in favor of adequately supporting schools, the debate about the role of money in education shifted to questions about how much money is needed (adequacy) and where it should be spent (efficacy).

According to Dr. Mathis, research suggests that, “…money should be directed toward: achieving lower student-teacher ratios; increasing teacher salaries; and longer school years. These reforms promoted the largest gains for children living in poverty and were strong enough to eliminate most of the adult outcome gaps between those raised in poor and non-poor families.”

The brief further recommends that adequate and equitable distributions of school financial resources are a necessary underlying condition for maintaining democracy, improving school quality, and equality of outcomes.

See “Does Money Matter,” by William J. Mathis, NEPC, June 16, 2016 at http://nepc.colorado.edu/publication/research-based-options

 

FYI ARTS

Field Trips Benefit Students: A survey by the American Association of School Administrators (AASA) shows that 30 percent of school administrators eliminated field trips between 2010-12 to help balance school district budgets.

But there is some good news, because this trend has ended, and in 2015-16 only 10 percent report eliminating field trips.

Information about the survey results is included in a Brookings.com article about how field trips expand student experiences and contribute to the true purpose of “education,” which comes from the Latin e ducere, which means “to draw out.”

The article refers to a 2015 research study, by Emilyn Ruble Whitesell, that found that middle school children who participated in field trips scored higher on science tests.

The article also cites a study of the Crystal Bridges Museum’s education program in northwest Arkansas. An analysis of students visiting the museum showed an increase in critical thinking ability and open-mindedness when compared to students who didn’t visit the museum.  The effects were greater for students from rural and high poverty schools.

See “Fewer field trips mean some students miss more than a day at the museum,” by Richard V. Reeves and Edward Rodrigue, Brookings.com, June 8, 2016, at http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/social-mobility-memos/posts/2016/06/08-value-of-field-trips-for-poorer-kids-reeves.

See “The Educational Value of Field Trips,” by Jay P. Greene, Brian Kisida, and Daniel H. Bowen, EducationNext, Winter 2014 at

http://educationnext.org/the-educational-value-of-field-trips/

See “A Day at the Museum: The Impact of Field Trips to Informal Science Education Institutions on Middle School Science Achievement,” by Emilyn Ruble Whitesell, Working Paper #03-15 July 2015 at http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/scmsAdmin/media/users/js5333/Working_paper_03-15.pdf

 

NJ Releases Interactive School Performance Dashboards for Arts Education: The New Jersey Arts Education Partnership, Bob Morrison chair, released on June 8, 2016 the New Jersey Arts Report Card for the 2014-15 school year.  The report card provides parents, students, teachers, and community members with information about the status of arts education programs in New Jersey’s public schools through interactive school performance dashboards for arts education. The data was collected by the New Jersey Department of Education and analyzed by the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership, and can be viewed by school, district, county, or state totals.  Findings are also compared to averages for the entire state.

According to the 2014-15 NJ report card, 1.3 million students (98 percent) in New Jersey participated in public school arts education programs during the most recent school year; 96 percent of schools in New Jersey reported offering arts education programs; arts participation in high school increased for the third straight year to 50 percent; 81 percent of New Jersey students participated in more than one arts program; participation increased significantly in dance and theater; and  “For the first time, middle school data reveals 89% of all students participating in one or more art form while 94% of elementary students engage in arts learning.”

The report cards also show that 83 percent of schools offer courses in music and visual art, but few schools offer courses in dance (2.6 percent) and theatre (4.5 percent).

According to the report, “The information does not address the quality of the programs, elementary school participation or the impact of scheduling changes created by recent educational reform initiatives or new statewide assessments. All of these areas require further research.”

The New Jersey Arts Education Partnership (NJAEP), founded in 2007, is an independent 501c3 non-profit organization “…with a mission to provide a unified voice for a diverse group of constituents who agree on the educational benefits and impact of the arts, specifically the contribution they make to student achievement and a civilized, sustainable society.”

See http://artsednj.org/reports-and-data/interactive-school-performance-dashboard/

See http://artsednj.org/state-of-the-arts-one-million-public-school-students-participate-in-arts-education/

 


This update is written weekly by Joan Platz, Research and Knowledge Director for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

The purpose of the update is to keep arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association , Ohio Art Education Association, Ohio Educational Theatre AssociationOhioDance, and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

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ESSA Talking Points for Arts Education Advocates

The Ohio Department of Education and local school districts will be developing plans to implement the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) over the next few months.

The League of American Orchestras believes that ESSA provides a new opportunity to expand student access to arts and music education programs, which were marginalized under the testing and high stakes requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act and Race to the Top grant.

The League of American Orchestras has prepared Talking Points that identify certain provisions of ESSA that could be used to strengthen arts education programs.  Arts education advocates should urge state and local educators and policy makers to implement these recommendations in state and local ESSA plans. The Talking Points, included below, have been adapted for discussions with policy leaders here in Ohio.

 

ESSA Talking Points

1) Make explicit the opportunity for the arts to help achieve Title I objectives.

“The arts and music are included as part of a “Well-Rounded Education” in federal law. This designation – alongside reading, math, science, and other subjects – is confirmation that the arts are essential to a complete education and belong in the main instructional day.”

Research shows that programs in the arts are an effective way to improve student attendance, parent engagement, school climate, and improve student outcomes in achievement, communication, problem solving, collaboration, and creativity.

2) Affirm that, “Federal education funding (such as Title I, teacher training, and school improvement) is directed to support all aspects of a well-rounded education, including all disciplines of the arts.”

3) Encourage policies in state and local plans that support professional development opportunities for arts educators and school leaders in Title II, and include arts education programs in the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant program and STEM programs.

4) Recommend that the state report student access to, and participation in, the arts on the report cards for all students, and all schools and school districts.

5) Support early childhood education programs, and align Ohio’s Early Learning Standards with the federal standards.

“The arts are a key component to successful early childhood programs. Federal policy includes use of the Creative Arts Expression framework of evidence-based research as central to the implementation of early childhood education program. Similarly, ESSA implementation of Title IX should keep the arts in the definition of “Essential Domains of School Readiness” for pre-school grants.”

League of American Orchestras: Active Advocacy Issues

Performing Arts Alliance: Arts Advocacy Issue Center – Federal Funding for Arts Education

National Association for Music Education: Everything ESSA

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education: Every Student Succeeds Act A Summary of the Law as it Pertains to Arts Education

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Arts On Line Education Update June 13, 2016

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
Joan Platz
June 13, 2016

 

LEGISLATIVE NEWS

131st General Assembly: The Ohio House and Senate are on break, but the Joint Education Oversight Committee, chaired by Senator Cliff Hite, has scheduled a meeting on June 15, 2016 at 1:30 PM in the South Hearing Room.  The committee was created in HB64 (Smith) – Biennial Budget, to review and evaluate education programs at schools and state institutions of higher education.  In addition to Senator Hite the other committee members are Representatives Bob Cupp (R-Lima), Andrew Brenner (R-Powell), Ryan Smith (R-Gallipolis), John Patterson (D-Jefferson), and Teresa Fedor (D-Toledo), and Senators Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering), Randy Gardner (R-Bowling Green), Sandra Williams (D-Cleveland), and Tom Sawyer (D-Akron).

 

Representative Sears Resigns: Last week Representative Barbara Sears (R) announced that she will resign from the 47th House District on July 1, 2016. The term-limited lawmaker will join the Office of Health Transformation (OHT) as its assistant director.  The Republican caucus expects to fill the vacancy after the November election, in which Derek Merrin (R) will face Michael Sarantou (D) for the seat.

 

New Congressman Elected from the 8th District: Warren Davidson, a businessman from Troy, Ohio, was sworn into office in a ceremony on June 9, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.  He won a special election on June 7, 2016 to complete the term of Congressman John Boehner (8th Congressional District), who resigned last year.

Congressman Davidson defeated Democrat Corey Foister and Green Party candidate James J. Condit, Jr., in the special election, but will have to face Democratic candidate Corey Foister again in the November 8th General Election to retain the seat.

See http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/politics/2016/06/09/after-seven-months-district-gets-voice-congress/85646122/

 

Bills Introduced:

SB338 (Schiavoni-Tavares) Recording and Broadcast Committee Hearings:  Requires the Ohio Government Telecommunications Service to record, live broadcast, and archive all General Assembly committee hearings.

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION TO MEET

The State Board of Education, Tom Gunlock president, will meet on June 13-14, 2016 at the Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus, Ohio.

This month the State Board will be reviewing a recommendation to lower the cut scores on two statewide high school end-of-course tests in geometry and integrated mathematics II.

Jim Wright, director of curriculum and assessment at the Ohio Department of Education (ODE), sent State Board members a memo last week explaining that fewer students met the proficiency targets on these exams than predicted, and the difference between predicted results and preliminary results on these two exams was greater when compared to predictions for other exams.  The State Board set the cut scores for the high school exams in January 2016 based on predicted achievement.

The tests were developed by American Institutes of Research (AIR), which became the vendor for all statewide assessments in Ohio this school year. Students completed the exams in the spring.  Achievement on the exams will be a graduation requirement factor for students in Class of 2018.

Preliminary test scores show that 24 percent of students taking the geometry exam scored at proficient or above, compared to the predicted results of 59 percent, and 21 percent of students taking the integrated mathematics II exam scored at least proficient, compared to the predicted results of 56 percent.

Lowering the cut scores will increase the number of students who are considered proficient for the spring administration of the test.

The State Board will also consider a definition of “consistently high-performing teachers” at this meeting.

The State Board is required to approve a definition by July 1, 2016 pursuant to 131-HB64 (Smith) Biennial Budget. (ORC 3319.22)

But the Educator Standards Board and teacher organizations oppose a definition approved at the May meeting of the State Board of Education’s Capacity Committee by a vote of 5 to 2.

The Educator Standards Board was originally tasked to develop the definition, but could not, concluding that the law is unworkable, because there is no research to support the proposed criteria to determine a consistently high performing teacher, and the “reward” for being identified as a consistently high performing teacher is not appropriate.  The law exempts a consistently high performing teacher from requirements to complete additional coursework for the renewal of their licenses and from any requirements prescribed by local professional development committees.  But members of the Educator Standards Board in a May 3, 2016 draft resolution explain that teacher professional development should be encouraged and supported.

The definition approved by the Capacity Committee states that a consistently high performing teacher has received the highest final summative rating on the Ohio Teacher Evaluation system for at least four of the past five years, and meets at least one of the following criteria for three out of five years:

-Holds either a valid Senior or Lead Professional Teaching License.

-Holds a locally recognized teacher leadership role, which enhances educational practices by providing professional learning experiences at the district, regional, state or higher educational level.

-Serves in a leadership role for a national or state professional academic education organization.

-Serves on a state-level committee supporting education.

-Received a state or national educational recognition or award.

In addition to these issues, the State Board will consider the following at its June meeting:

On June 13, 2016 at 8:00 AM the State Board will conduct a Chapter 119 Hearing in room 102 on two rules:  3301-16-06 Retaking of End of Course Examinations and 3301-16-07 End of Course Examination in Science.

Following the hearing, the following committees will meet:

-The Appointments Committee will meet to consider appointments to the Educator Standards Board.

-The Achievement Committee, chaired by Rebecca Vazquez-Skillings, will review performance levels for state testing; discuss the EdChoice Scholarship Program and Rules (3301-11-01 to 15); discuss Non-Public Rules (3301-39-01 to 03); and discuss Gifted Services.

-The Capacity Committee, chaired by Dr. Frank Pettigrew, will approve PRAXIS and Ohio Assessments for Educators (OAE) tests, and discuss a pass rate analysis and new test recommendations and score-setting.  The committee will also discuss Rules 3301-2-01 to 3301-2-18: Confidential Personal Information.

-The Accountability Committee, chaired by Melanie Bolender, will discuss the Community Learning Center Rules; adopt minimum performance levels for 3301-45-06(E); and discuss High Performing Educational Service Centers (ESCs).

-The Urban & Rural Renewal Committee, chaired by Mary Rose Oakar, will receive a presentation from the Public Children Services Association of Ohio (PCSAO) and a presentation from the Coalition for Homelessness and Housing in Ohio (COHHO), and receive a presentation on McKinney-Vento Act.

Following lunch the State Board will convene its business meeting, review written reports and items for vote, and receive the report of the Interim Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The State Board will then convene in Executive Session and recess at its conclusion.  A Work Group on the State Board’s Professional Development is scheduled to meet after the State Board’s Executive Session. The work group will finalize changes for the Board’s policy manual relating to professional development, and discuss additional changes.

On June 14, 2016 the State Board will start at 8:00 AM with a meeting of the Legislative and Budget Committee, chaired by Kathleen McGervey. The committee will receive an update about legislation.

Following that committee meeting, the Standards and Graduation Requirements Committee, chaired by C. Todd Jones, will discuss implementation of ACT/SAT and Workkeys; review the progress of the English language arts and math standards review; and discuss preliminary public comment results about the proposed honors diploma rules.

The State Board will then reconvene its business meeting; receive committee reports; receive a presentation on the Gifted Standards; and discuss board goals.

Following lunch or at 1:00 PM, the State Board will receive a presentation entitled “Necessary, but is it Sufficient for 21st Century Jobs?”; receive public participation on agenda and non-agenda items; vote on the Report and Recommendations of the Interim Superintendent of Public Instruction; consider old business and new business, and adjourn.

June 2016 Report and Recommendations of the Interim Superintendent of Public Instruction:

#3 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Rescind and Adopt Rules 3301-102-02 and -03 of the Administrative Code, and to Amend Rules 3301-102- 04,-05, and -07 of the Administrative Code Regarding Community Schools.

#4  Approve a Resolution to Amend Rule 3301-28-04 of the Administrative Code Entitled Performance Indicators.

#19 Approve a Resolution of Appointment to the Educator Standards Board.

#20 Approve a Resolution to Adopt the Revised State Agency Teacher Evaluation Framework in Accordance with Section 3391.112 of the Revised Code.

#21 Approve a Resolution to Confirm the Lakota Local School District Board of Education’s Determination of Impractical to Transport Certain Students Attending St. Wendelin Catholic School in Fostoria, Seneca County, Ohio.

#22 Approve a Resolution of Intent to Amend Rules 3301-24-08, 3301-24-25, and 3301-24-26 of the Administrative Code, Regarding Licensure Renewals.

#23 Approve a Resolution to Adopt a Minimum Performance for the Percentage of Diplomas Awarded through the 22+ Adult Diploma Program.

#24  Approve a Resolution to Adjust Performance Levels for Geometry and Integrate Mathematics II.

See http://education.ohio.gov/State-Board/State-Board-Meetings/State-Board-Meetings-for-2016

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Senate Committee Approves Education Appropriations:  The Senate Committee on Appropriations, chaired by Senator Cochran, approved on June 9, 2016 a bipartisan appropriations bill, S.3040, which would fund the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) at $67.8 billion in FY17, a decrease of $220 million over the current level.

The FY17 appropriations bill includes small increases for several federal programs, including Title I Support for Disadvantaged Students, which is currently funded at $14.9 billion, but would receive a $500 million increase to $15.4 billion.  However, education advocates have noted that the increase is not enough to cover the loss of funding for Title I School Improvement Grants (SIG) program, which was eliminated under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). To replace SIG funding, lawmakers included in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) a requirement that school districts set-aside 7 percent of their Title I funds to support school improvement efforts.  Currently school districts set aside 4 percent.

The bill also increases the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by $40 million, which would raise total funding to $11.95 billion, and increases funds for charter schools by $10 million to $343 million.

Appropriations for career tech education would remain the same at around $1 billion, along with funding for the Preschool Development Grants at $250 million; the Promise Neighborhood program at $73.2 million; and Education Innovation and Research program, which replaces the Investing in Innovation grant program, and would receive $120 million.

The bill decreases appropriations for Teacher Quality State Grants by $200 million to $2.3 billion.

The appropriations bill also includes $300 million for the new Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants program (SSAEG), even though ESSA authorized up to $1.6 billion, and President Obama recommended $500 million.

SSAEG is a flexible grant program which school districts can use to pay for counseling, advanced coursework, safety, technology, and arts and STEM education.  But the small amount appropriated will mean that there will be fewer dollars available per grant.

The bill also includes $27 million for the new Assistance for Arts Education program, formerly the Arts in Education grant program.  Advocates were seeking a $3 million increase in this fund to raise it to $30 million.

Funding for the Javits Gifted and Talented program is unchanged at $12 million.

The Senate Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee, Senator Lisa Murkowski chair, will meet on June 14, 2016 to consider an appropriations bill to fund the Department of the Interior, which includes the National Endowment for the Arts and Humanities.

The U.S. House of Representatives Interior Appropriations Subcommittee approved on May 25, 2016 legislation to fund the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for Humanities at $150 million, an increase of almost $2 million.

See a summary of the S.3040 at http://www.appropriations.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/060916-FY17-LaborHHS-Approps-Full-Committee-Markup-Summary-Web.pdf

See the bill at http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/cpquery/T?&report=sr274&dbname=114&

See “Senate Panel Approves K-12 Spending Bill, Despite Concerns Over ESSA’s Flexible Fund,” by Alyson Klein, Education Week, June 9, 2016 at http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/senate_panel_approves_k-12_spe.html

 

States Should Adopt Inspection-Based Accountability Systems: Professor Helen Ladd at Duke University recommends in an article for The Brown Center Chalkboard that states consider adapting inspection and review systems to replace test-based accountability systems.

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), states now have flexibility to create more comprehensive accountability systems that include multiple indicators of success, and are based on research.

Inspection and review systems, sometimes referred to as “school quality reviews” have been used in England, the Netherlands, and New Zealand for some time.  Professional inspectors visit schools periodically, and, following a standard protocol, evaluate the policies, practices, and student outcomes, and issue a public report with recommendations.

The author writes that state accountability systems based mostly on test scores expanded under No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and Race to the Top, but these systems haven’t improved education outcomes appreciably.  Since 2002 when NCLB was enacted, math scores have improved modestly, but scores have remained flat for English language arts.

Test-based accountability systems that narrow student success to achievement in math and English language arts have also caused unintended and negative consequences.  Schools have narrowed the curriculum to focus on tested subjects, short changing students who deserve a high quality education, and raised the stakes, by rating schools and teachers based on student scores.  These results have led to increased anxiety among teachers, parents, and students, and a backlash against testing.

Test-based accountability systems also do not address the challenges that high poverty schools face, and put these schools at a disadvantage.

According to Professor Ladd, there are several benefits of the inspection accountability system.  The inspection report highlights the strengths and weaknesses of a school and shows how the school can better address the needs of students; provides a way to document and disseminate best practices; broadens the types of student outcomes desired, such as citizenship, and healthy relationships; holds schools accountable for the practices under their control, rather than societal factors like poverty; and provides information for policy makers about where resources and capacity are needed to meet the needs of students.

She recommends that federal policymakers make funding available for states to develop school inspection systems.  She writes, “The potential benefits are great.  The challenge is to convince policymakers that qualitative judgements, not just quantifiable outcomes such as test scores, have an important role to play in raising the quality of schools by assuring that they attend to the needs of all their students and fostering a broad range of student outcomes.”

See “Now is the time to experiment with inspections for school accountability,” by Helen Ladd, The Brown Center Chalkboard, May 26, 2016 at http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/brown-center-chalkboard/posts/2016/05/26-inspections-school-accountability-ladd

Senate panel funding

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2016/06/whats_in_the_senate_spending_b.html?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=campaignk-12

 

OHIO NEWS

Committee Approves New STEM Schools: The Ohio STEM Committee accepted six schools into the STEM Learning Network (OSLN) on June 6, 2016, bringing the total number of STEM schools in Ohio to 31. The schools accepted include DECA Prep, DECA High School, St. Gabriel School, Mad River Middle School, Springfield High School, and St. Vincent de Paul Parish School. The Linden McKinley STEM Academy program was accepted under conditions.

The Ohio STEM Learning Network is managed by Battelle, which supports STEM programs and best practices in Ohio and Tennessee.

The Kasich administration recently proposed to expand STEM programs to grades K-5 in HB474 (Brown), and create a STEAM designation, for STEM schools that also integrate the arts in the curriculum.

See http://www.osln.org/2016/06/2016-stem-designated-schools/

 

State Revenue and Spending Under Estimates: The Office of Budget and Management (OBM), Tim Keen director, released on June 10, 2016 its Monthly Financial Report, which shows that total state revenue is $19.7 billion this fiscal year, which is a drop from budget projections of $20.2 billion.  Some of the $503.2 million shortfall could be made-up as the certain taxes are collected in June, but overall (year to date) the personal income tax is down by 3.2 percent; the CAT by 1.8 percent; and the cigarette and other tobacco tax is down by 4.2 percent.

On the spending side, the state is running below estimates by $328.6 million.   Spending is down for Medicaid, primary and secondary education, and health and human services. Year to date, the state spent $32.4 billion in this fiscal year compared to $29.0 billion last year.

The OBM estimates that the state will end FY16 with an unencumbered final balance of $468.7 million.

See http://www.obm.ohio.gov/budget/monthlyfinancial/doc/2016-06_mfr.pdf

 

OBM Opens Interactive Budget Website: The OBM also announced on June 6, 2016 a new interactive feature on its website to follow state finances. The website includes information about expenditures and revenue for each state agency, and for suppliers and recipients of state revenue. For example, a user can drill down to see the amount of funds the state disburses to school districts and community schools.  A search of the Ohio Virtual Academy shows that the online charter school received a total of $75,715,150 in FY2016 (YTD).  This includes payments from Foundation Funding; a federal ESEA grant; a federal Individual with Disabilities Education Act grant; a School Improvement Grant; a Race to the Top Grant totaling $17,560.02; and payments for Community School Facilities totaling $228,930.50.

See http://interactivebudget.ohio.gov

 

Court Overturns More Ohio Voting Laws: In the space of three weeks two federal judges have issued rulings overturning recently enacted Ohio election laws.

A decision by U.S. District Judge Michael H. Watson for U.S. District Court (Southern District of Ohio, Eastern Division) issued on May 24, 2016, will require Ohio’s election officials to restore some early in person voting days and the so called “Golden Week,” which is a time before an election when voters can register to vote and cast a ballot at the same time.

The judge found that 130-SB238, which was signed into law in February 2014, violated the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act by disproportionately affecting African American voters, who used early voting 3.5 times more than white voters in 2008, and 5 times more in 2012, according to the decision.

(The Ohio Democratic Party, the Democratic Party of Cuyahoga County, and the Montgomery County Democratic Party v. Husted, et al.)

On June 7, 2016 U.S. District Court Judge Algenon Marbley (Southern District of Ohio Eastern Division) ruled that provisions in two other laws that took effect in 2014, 130-SB205 (Coley) and 130-SB216 (Seitz), violate the equal protection provision of the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the Voting Rights Act, because the laws disproportionately impact minority voters.

(Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless, et al., v. Jon Husted)

Judge Marbley found that the laws added new requirements that voided absentee and provisional ballots for technical flaws, which could have been corrected by voters, and were not applied uniformly among counties, disqualifying the homeless and minority voters more than others.

He also found unconstitutional provisions that prohibited poll workers from helping voters unless they requested help due to a disability, and a provision that shortened the number of days from 10 to 7 for voters to verify their voting status.

The ruling overturns the applicable provisions in the two laws and restores to 10 days the time allowed for voters to affirm their voting status.

Secretary of State Jon Husted appealed both court decisions to the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  In his appeal Secretary Husted wrote that the decisions conflict with each other, and will lead to chaos and voter confusion in upcoming elections.

In an update of Judge Watson’s ruling, the judge denied on June 9, 2016 Secretary Husted’s request to delay reinstating “the golden week” for the November 8, 2016 election, but postponed it for the August 2, 2016 special election.

See “Judge rules Ohio voting laws unconstitutional,” Robert Higgs, The Plain Dealer, June 7, 2016 at http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2016/06/federal_judge_finds_ohio_laws.html

See the decision at http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/electionlaw/litigation/documents/NEOCH-opinion060716.pdf

See the decision at http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/electionlaw/litigation/documents/OOC-FactsConclusions052416.pdf

See “Judge rules Ohio voter rights violated”, by Darrel Rowland, The Columbus Dispatch, May 25, 2016 at

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/05/24/ohio-golden-week-ruling.html

See “Judge orders ‘golden week’ to be revived,” by Darrel Rowland, The Columbus Dispatch, June 10, 2016

 

REPORTS

U.S. Survey Identifies Inequities: The U.S. Department of Education’s (USDOE) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) released on June 7, 2016 some of the results of the 2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC).  

The CRDC is a survey of 16,758 school districts, 95,507 public schools, and over 50 million students. It includes information about student access to courses, programs, instruction, staff, and resources, and school climate factors, such as bullying and student discipline.

The USDOE will release additional data on various topics later in 2016, but focused this report on the survey results for school discipline, restraint and seclusion, early learning, college and career readiness, chronic student absenteeism, education in justice facilities, and teacher and staffing equity.  The following is a sample of the results:

-School Discipline:  The survey results show racial disparities in suspensions in K-12 schools.  “While 6% of all K-12 students received one or more out-of-school suspensions, the percentage is 18% for black boys; 10% for black girls; 5% for white boys; and 2% for white girls.”

-Preschool:  The survey found that 54 percent of school districts provide preschool programs for children not served by IDEA, and 86 percent offer part-day or full-day preschool programs at no cost.

-Access to Courses:  Rigorous courses are not available in all schools.  According to the survey, nationwide 48 percent of high schools offer calculus; 60 percent offer physics; 72 percent offer chemistry; and 78 percent offer algebra II.  African American and Hispanic students have less access to high level math and science courses, and course participation rates differ by race/ethnicity/gender, disability, and English language learner status.

There is also unequal access to accelerated courses or programs, with only 28 percent of African American and Hispanic students participating in gifted and talented education programs.

-Absenteeism:  New survey results also show chronic student absenteeism.  “Nationwide, more than 6.5 million students – or 13% of all students – are chronically absent (absent 15 or more school days during the school year).” More than 3 million high school students (18 percent) are chronically absent and more than 3.5 million elementary students are chronically absent.

The report also notes that coming this fall the public will be able to look up 2013-14 CRDC data for individual schools, school districts, and states by visiting the CRDC website at ocrdata.ed.gov.

See “2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection:  A First Look:  Key Data Highlights on Equity and Opportunity Gaps in our Nation’s Public Schools,” USDOE Office of Civil Rights, June 7, 2016 at http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/2013-14-first-look.pdf.

 

FYI ARTS

CWRU Receives Gift to Study Popular Music: The Plain Dealer reported on June 6, 2016 that Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) has received a $1 million gift from the James Richman, Elissa Richman, and the Richman Family Foundation of the Jewish Communal Fund.

The grant will support CWRU’s Center for Popular Music Studies, and the new Richman Fund for Popular Music Studies.  The music studies program examines the role of popular music in our lives, through research and teaching, musical performance, public programming, and partnerships with other Cleveland cultural institutions, youth programs, and area schools.

The Richman Fund will also expand CWRU’s partnership with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, and provide fellowships for visiting scholars at CWRU and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives.

James “Great Neck” Richman, is a CWRU alumnus and has served as a trustee at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

See “CWRU receives $1M for music studies,” by Karen Farkas, The Plain Dealer, June 6, 2016 at

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/06/case_western_reserve_receives.html

 

ESSA Talking Points for Arts Education Advocates: The Ohio Department of Education and local school districts, will be developing plans to implement the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) over the next few months.

The League of American Orchestras believes that ESSA provides a new opportunity to expand student access to arts and music education programs, which were marginalized under the testing and high stakes requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act and Race to the Top grant.

The Orchestra League has prepared Talking Points that identify certain provisions of ESSA that could be used to strengthen arts education programs.  Arts education advocates should urge state and local educators and policy makers to implement these recommendations in state and local ESSA plans. The Talking Points, included below, have been adapted for discussions with policy leaders here in Ohio.

ESSA Talking Points

1) Make explicit the opportunity for the arts to help achieve Title I objectives.

“The arts and music are included as part of a “Well-Rounded Education” in federal law. This designation – alongside reading, math, science, and other subjects – is confirmation that the arts are essential to a complete education and belong in the main instructional day.”

Research shows that programs in the arts are an effective way to improve student attendance, parent engagement, school climate, and improve student outcomes in achievement, communication, problem solving, collaboration, and creativity.

2) Affirm that, “Federal education funding (such as Title I, teacher training, and school improvement) is directed to support all aspects of a well-rounded education, including all disciplines of the arts.”

3) Encourage policies in state and local plans that support professional development opportunities for arts educators and school leaders in Title II, and include arts education programs in the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant program and STEM programs.

4) Recommend that the state report student access to, and participation in, the arts on the report cards for all students, and all schools and school districts.

5) Support early childhood education programs, and align Ohio’s Early Learning Standards with the federal standards.

“The arts are a key component to successful early childhood programs. Federal policy includes use of the Creative Arts Expression framework of evidence-based research as central to the implementation of early childhood education program. Similarly, ESSA implementation of Title IX should keep the arts in the definition of “Essential Domains of School Readiness” for pre-school grants.”

See http://americanorchestras.org/advocacy-government/be-heard/contact-congress-today.html?vvsrc=%2fCampaigns

See http://www.theperformingartsalliance.org/issue/federal-funding-for-arts-education/

See http://www.nafme.org/take-action/elementary-and-secondary-education-act-esea-updates/


This update is written weekly by Joan Platz, Research and Knowledge Director for the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education.

The purpose of the update is to keep arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association(www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association(www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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