Arts On Line Education Update March 27, 2017

OAAE Arts Online
March 27, 2017

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Ohio Department of Education Kicked off Assessment Analysis
Superintendent Paolo DeMaria’s Advisory Committee on Assessments had their first meeting Tuesday, March 21 with its purpose to review state and district-mandated testing and make recommendations to increase efficiency.  The group will meet several times through May with the intent of presenting their recommendations to the State Board of Education during their June meeting.  In a recent testimony to the House Education & Career Readiness Committee DeMaria concluded that ‘testing is an important piece of the work we do to create an education system focused on the success of our students.  However, no single piece of this work should be overly burdensome for teachers or students. The expansion of testing at the state and district levels has occurred without consideration of the overall amount of testing.  Each new policy or initiative is well intentioned and, by itself, may not disrupt instruction time.  Yet, taken as a whole, the amount of testing has left students, parents and teachers overwhelmed.’

Columbus Dispatch: Some Ohio educators question fairness of computer-required testing
“No. 2 pencils work the same, whether it’s a wealthy school or a poor one. That’s not necessarily the case with computer monitors, graphics cards and Internet connection speeds. This school year, Ohio law required all schools to switch to computer-based testing on state assessments. A few school administrators have questioned whether state testing in 2017 boils down to a situation of the haves vs. the have-nots.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Local tests are part of Ohio’s testing crush too, says state superintendent
“State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria talks with the state school board about his plans to study standardized testing.”

Columbus Dispatch: Columbus preparing for new grad testing options
“The Columbus city school district is preparing for new graduation testing options.”

Ohio Department of Education: FAQs Posted about Consistently High Performing Teachers
“State law directed the State Board of Education to define a consistently high-performing teacher. Districts can use the definition to identify teachers who can be exempted from completing additional coursework to renew their teaching licenses, including professional, lead professional or senior professional teaching licenses.”

OHIO NEWS

Ohio Arts Council: Columbus Student Wins 2017 Ohio Poetry Out Loud State Finals
“Madeleine Schroeder, a senior at Columbus Alternative High School (CAHS), won Ohio’s 12th annual Poetry Out Loud (POL) State Finals held on Saturday, March 4, at the Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center in Worthington, Ohio. Schroeder recited “The Gaffe” by C.K. Williams, “Snow Day” by Billy Collins, and “I Find No Peace” by Thomas Wyatt. […]   Nearly 200 teachers and 9,000 students from across Ohio participated in a POL program in 2016-17. Prior to the State Finals—when 12 Ohio finalists competed for state champion—Schroeder participated in the Central/Columbus regional semifinal on February 19. This is the first year that Ohio POL has increased to six regional semifinals through expanded partnerships. Learn more about POL’s regional expansion and partnerships at oac.ohio.gov/poetryoutloud/partners.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Cleveland school board approves teacher contract
Cleveland school district CEO Eric Gordon and school board chair Anne Bingham prepare for the board’s vote on the new teacher contract Tuesday.

Columbus Dispatch:  Private Colleges Leaving Ohio Program Providing Tuition-Free Classes to Middle School, High School Students
“Kinks and growing pains in the popular College Credit Plus program mean some of Ohio’s small, private colleges won’t offer classes to middle school and high school students next year”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio Teacher Evaluations Could Use Test Scores for More Growth, Less Judgment
“Teacher evaluations and ratings in Ohio should be restructured to make them less judgmental and more focused on helping teachers improve, a state panel and Ohio Superintendent Paolo DeMaria said Monday.”

Columbus Dispatch:  Now Ohio Schools Must Decide Transgender Bathroom Issue after Lawsuit Dropped
“It’s now up to individual Ohio school districts to decide which restroom and shower facility their transgender students should use.”

Stow Sentry:  State’s delay in education plan renews optimism 
“The decision by the Ohio Department of Education to delay submitting the state’s education plan to federal regulators is raising local educators’ hopes that their voices may be heard.”

NATIONAL NEWS

Students with Disabilities: Supreme Court Rules In Favor and Expands Rights

NPR: The Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of A Special Education Students
“School districts must give students with disabilities the chance to make meaningful, “appropriately ambitious” progress, the Supreme Court said Wednesday in an 8-0 ruling.  The decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District could have far-reaching implications for the 6.5 million students with disabilities in the United States.”

US News and World report: Supreme Court Expands Rights for Students with Disabilities
“In a unanimous decision with major implications for students with disabilities, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that schools must provide higher educational standards for children with special needs.  The 8-0 ruling in the Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District case states that schools must do more than provide a “merely more than de minimis” education for students with disabilities and instead must provide them with an opportunity to make “appropriately ambitious” progress in line with the federal education law.”

Call To Action from the National Arts Education Association Re: Proposed Federal Budget

NAEA: Federal Support for the Arts and Art Education

Check out this call to action from the National Arts Education Association regarding the recently proposed federal budget.  Under the Trump Administration budget proposal the $62 billion federal education budget would be cut by over $9 billion, or 13.5%.  Also included in the proposal is the elimination of four cultural agencies: the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting endowments.

Cleveland Plain Dealer:  President Trump’s Education Budget Could Bode Poorly for Large, Urban Districts Like Cleveland
“Cleveland’s public schools have counted on a steadily rising pool of federal money to help educate poor students and those with special needs.”

ESSA and the Arts

Education Commission of the States: AEP State Policy Symposium Connects the Arts and State Policy
“To build on the Arts Education Partnership’s (AEP) work of aiding states in including the arts as they craft plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), AEP, along with its collaborators Americans for the Arts and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, convened approximately 140 arts in education leaders last Saturday for the 2017 AEP State Policy Symposium.”

Other National News Clips

Washington Post: Opioid crisis intensifies, MD system looks at ‘recovery’ school
“Kevin Burnes thinks his school saved his life. He arrived there at 14 years old, just out of rehab […]”

US News & World Report:  How Schools can Lead On Schooling
“The No Child Left Behind era featured widespread concerns about narrowing curricula, an ineffectual checklist-driven approach to school improvement, a fixation on testing and the sense that too many students and schools were treated as an afterthought because they were deemed to be doing “well enough.” The new law offers a chance to do something about those concerns, while energizing school reform and separating it from the bitter politics of the nation’s capital. Here are three of the places where there are enormous opportunities for states to lead the way.”

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

House Education & Career Readiness Committee – Tuesday, March 21

The Ohio Department of Education Superintendent, Paolo DeMaria, presented the committee with an overview of Ohio’s school assessment system.   Touching on the mechanics of the type and timing of assessments, as well as Ohio’s testing history, DeMaria outlined the complexity of the process as well as ODE’s plan to examine testing-related issues with an advisory committee.

HB108: FINANCIAL LITERACY (Hagan, C., McColley, R.)

In an effort to help students avoid unnecessary debt and help those who need loans to navigate the process easier, bill sponsor Representative Hagan has recommended a required financial literacy class for high school students in Ohio.  Hagan stated that this legislation would ensure students would have ‘ the tools they need to wisely navigate future financial decisions by being taught the principles of economics and financial literacy with an emphasis on personal finance, the concepts of credit, debt, investments and sound money management, through at least ½ unit of their high school curriculum.’

Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education – Wednesday & Thursday, March 22 and 23

HB49:  Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget

Over the two day period, more than 35 witnesses testified on the impact they felt the proposed budget may have to their school system or program.

Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee – Wednesday, March 22

SB54:  SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM  (Brown, E., Lehner, P.)

Brandi Slaughter, CEO of Voices for Ohio’s Children, testified of the high rates of food insecurities Ohio children face and the subsequent need for summer food programs around the state.

Senate Education Committee – Wednesday, March 22

SB85: SCHOOL CHOICE  (Huffman, M.)

Bill sponsor, Representative Huffman, told the committee that SB85 would ‘fund a newly created, income-based opportunity scholarship program for students in Ohio to attend a chartered non-public school of their choice’.  However, his testimony was met with criticism from the committee as the feasibility of the bill was questioned with Ohio’s current tight budget.

SB82: SCHOOL ABSENCES (Williams, S., Lehner, P.)

The committee heard sponsor testimony on SB82 which would require schools to call parents within one hour of the start of the school day if their child has been marked absent. 

Newly Introduced Legislation

SB104: SCHOOL SECLUSION  (Tavares, C.)

To prohibit the use of seclusion on students in public schools

SB105: MONTH DESIGNATION  (Tavares, C.)

To designate the month of October as “Ohio Principals Month.”

SB111: SCHOOL ZONES  (Tavares, C.)

To require school zones to be indicated by signs equipped with flashing or other lights or that indicate the times during which the restrictive speed limit is enforced, and to make an appropriation.

HB134: SCHOOL GRANTS  (Hambley, S., Kick, D.)

To allow community improvements board grants to a school district to be spent for permanent improvements outside the county so long as the improvements are within the school district.

HB154: COMMERCIAL DRIVER STUDENTS  (Smith, R., Manning, N.)

To establish the Commercial Truck Driver Student Aid program and to make an appropriation.

 

ON THE CALENDAR – Week of March 27

Tuesday, March 28

4:00 p.m. Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness

  • HB98: CAREER INFORMATION  (Duffey, M., Boggs, K.) – 2nd Hearing-Proponent
    • Summary: Regarding the presentation of career information to students
  • HB108: FINANCIAL LITERACY  (Hagan, C., McColley, R.) – 2nd Hearing-Proponent
    • Summary: To require one-half unit of financial literacy in the high school curriculum

 

Wednesday, March 29

3:15 p.m. South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee

  • SB82: SCHOOL ABSENCES  (Williams, Lehner, P.) – 2nd Hearing- Proponent
    • Summary: Call parents within one hour if students are absent from school without excuse

Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.  The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net). This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator. 

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Arts On Line Education Update March 20, 2017

OAAE Arts Online
Monday, March 20, 2017

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT  (ESSA)

Ohio Department of Education (ODE) announces submission delay

ODE has listened to concerned stakeholder feedback regarding Ohio’s draft ESSA plan and announced the decision to delay the submission until September.  ODE will also launch the Superintendent’s Advisory Committee on Assessments to focus solely on addressing testing concerns. Thank you to all OAAE members and partners who joined us in making our concerns known to the department!

In a statement released on March 13, 2017, Superintendent Paolo DeMaria stated “Federal law now gives states the flexibility to make choices that best suit our needs. We are convening a Superintendent’s Advisory Committee on Assessments to focus on the full range of testing issues — including state-required tests, as well as district -level tests. From the beginning, we also have envisioned a more comprehensive strategic planning process that would not be limited by the narrow focus of federal regulations. We are excited to begin that work. To allow this work to advance and drive needed change, the Department will delay the ESSA submission to the U.S. Department of Education to September. This also will allow more time to ensure that feedback received on the draft template can be considered carefully.”

Dayton Daily News: Ohio delays plan on new federal education law

3/14/2017 – The Ohio Department of Education has decided to delay until September submission of its plan to implement new federal education law.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: State to delay its ESSA plan, will examine testing, teacher evals

3/14/2017 – State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria will delay finalizing Ohio’s education and accountability plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) until September.

Columbus Dispatch: Complaints get state of Ohio to review amount of testing in schools

3/14/2017 – Responding in part to demands for less student testing, Ohio school Superintendent Paolo DeMaria announced Monday that the state will delay submission of its education plan to federal regulators to allow for building a consensus and additional study of assessment concerns.

Toledo Blade: Ohio Department of Education delays submitting an education plan

3/14/2017 –  The Ohio Department of Education will delay submitting an education plan to the federal government, a victory for educators who have clamored in recent weeks for the state to incorporate more public feedback.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION – March Meeting

Revised Teacher Evaluation System Proposed to Board

The Ohio Educator Standards Board presented their recommendations for revising the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) to the State Board last Monday.  The six recommendations included:

  1. Update OTES Rubric to improve clarity.
  2. Embed the current student growth measures as sources of evidence within the rubric indicators in five of the ten specific domains in the OTES rubric: Knowledge of students, Differentiation, Assessment of student learning, Assessment data, and Professional responsibility.
  3. Remove shared attribution as it does not accurately measure individual teacher performance or student growth because the measure uses assessments for a cohort of students that the educator does not teach.
  4. Embed the Alternative Framework Components as sources of evidence in the revised OTES rubric by integrating alternate measures (like student surveys and portfolios) into the regular scoring rubric.
  5. Tailor the structure and timing of observations to meet the needs of teachers in order to focus on improvement and growth.
  6. Provide a professional growth process for teachers Rated ‘Accomplished’ and ‘Skilled’ to include a teacher-directed professional growth plan for the ‘Accomplished’ teacher and a professional growth plan (PGP) for the ‘Skilled’ teacher.

The full report can be read here.

Board to determine model “zero tolerance” policy

The Board began discussions on their role of adopting a model “zero tolerance” policy by July 5, 2017 for violent, disruptive or inappropriate behaviors, including excessive absences.  Last year’s HB 210 prohibited schools for suspending or expelling students for missing too much school.  As stated on ODE’s website, the Board’s new zero tolerance policy must ‘stress preventative strategies and alternatives to suspension and expulsion and assist districts with amending or creating district policies.’ The Board’s Educator and Student Options Committee plans to discuss the policy during their April meeting with the hopes of sending a plan for full Board vote at the June meeting.

Highlights of HB210 and more information are available here

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee continued to receive interested party testimony last week on Ohio’s proposed FY 2018-2019 Operating Budget (HB49).  The two day period marked the subcommittee’s 8th and 9th hearing on the matter.  Among the many who testified last week, the Ohio School Boards focused on school transportation.

Pete Japikse, senior consultant for the Ohio School Boards, cited the critical role buses play in a school day and Ohio school’s aging bus fleet as reasons for the subcommittee to consider changes to school transportation funding.   Mr. Japikse discussed several recommendations including the return of school bus purchasing assistance for school districts, adjustments in the base funding formula for transportation, and adjustments to the transportation supplement to help those districts that are most challenged with providing transportation.

The subcommittee has set public testimony on HB49 for Wednesday & Thursday, March 22 & 23 at 9 a.m.  Anyone planning to testify should prepare written testimony and submit it to the subcommittee chairman’s office, Rep. Robert R. Cupp (R-Lima), via email at least 24 hours prior to the hearing. FinanceSubPrimary&SecondaryEducationCommittee@ohiohouse.gov

Parkersburg News: Ohio teachers give low marks to proposed ‘externships’

3/11/17 – Both the Ohio Federation of Teachers and Ohio Education Association have made statements in opposition to the proposal, saying the externships are a good continuing education option but shouldn’t be mandatory.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

Proposed Federal Budget – Cuts to Education and Elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts

Under the Trump Administration budget proposal the $62 billion federal education budget would be cut by over $9 billion, or 13.5 percent.  Also included in the proposal is the elimination of four cultural agencies: the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting endowments.

Department of Education budget details include:

  • Cuts billions in grants for teacher training, after-school and summer programs, and aid programs to first-generation and low-income students
  • Increases charter school funding by $168 million
  • Creates new private-school choice program with $250 million

Trump Administration Budget Blueprint – White House Office of Budget and Management: America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again

Education Related News Clips:

Washington Post: Trump Seeks to Slash Education Department But Make Big Push for School Choice

3/16/17 – The Trump administration is seeking to cut $9.2 billion — or 13.5 percent — from the Education Department’s budget, a dramatic downsizing that would reduce or eliminate grants for teacher training, after-school programs and aid to ­low-income and first-generation college students

Associated Press: DeVos Promotes School Choice, Local Control

3/13/17 – Education Secretary Betsy DeVos sought to convince public school leaders that school choice and local control are important in education

Arts Related News Clips:

The New York Times: Trump Proposes Eliminating the Arts and Humanities Endowments

3/15/17 – A deep fear came to pass for many artists, museums, and cultural organizations nationwide early Thursday morning when President Trump, in his first federal budget plan, proposed eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. President Trump also proposed scrapping the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a key revenue source for PBS and National Public Radio stations, as well as the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Washington Post: Trump wants to cut the NEA and NEH. This is the worst-case scenario for arts groups

3/16/17 – Although the budgets of the four organizations slated for elimination are negligible as a percentage of the larger federal budget, they play a vital role in a cultural economy built on a system of federal stimulus. Federal dollars are used to leverage state, local and private funding that supports a complex network of arts organizations, educational entities, museums, libraries and public broadcasting affiliates.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

HB80: PASSED the HOUSE

The summer food program bill passed the House after an amendment was added that eliminated the requirement, and instead made it optional, for schools not currently providing summer food programs to enter into contracts with approved third party operators.

The House Education and Career Readiness Committee

HB98 Career Information 

3/14/17 – Bill sponsor, Mike Duffey, described the bill as an opportunity to establish minimum access standards for recruiters of skilled trades to communicate with students in grades 9-12. Duffey testified that companies seeking skilled labor are often denied access by the high schools to present in-person career information.

 Newly Introduced Bills:

HB149: Education Externship

Summary – To require the Governor to complete a forty-hour externship consisting of on-site work experience in city, local, and exempted village school districts in the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 school years.

 

ON THE CALENDAR – Week of March 20

Tuesday, March 21

4:00 p.m. Ohio State House Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Committee

  • Presentation by the Ohio Department of Education, Superintendent Paolo DeMaria
  • HB108 Financial Literacy  1st Hearing-Sponsor

Wednesday, March 22

10:00 a.m. Senate North Hearing Room

Senate Government Oversight & Reform Committee

  • SB54: Summer Food Program

3:15 p.m. Senate South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee

  • Confirmation hearing on governor’s appointment of Kara Morgan, State Board of Education
  • SB85: School Choice 1st Hearing-Sponsor
  • SB82: School Absences 1st Hearing-Sponsor

 

OHIO NEWS CLIPS

Findlay Courier: FHS principal: Many may not graduate in 2018

3/14/2017: About 30 percent of Findlay High School juniors are in danger of not graduating next year, Principal Craig Kupferberg told the school board.

Columbus Dispatch: Truancy bill would require call to parent within hour of student’s absence
3/13/17 – Ohio students who miss school without an excuse can expect a phone call home within an hour of failing to arrive if a truancy bill in the legislature becomes law.  Sen. Sandra Williams, D-Cleveland, proposed the bill after the disappearance and killing of 14-year-old Alianna DeFreeze.

 

Columbus Dispatch:  Mosaic Program Helps Central Ohio Students Find Their Place in the World  

3/10/17 – During the half-day program, enrollees set aside their textbooks and leave the traditional classroom to immerse themselves in Columbus’ diversity.  Throughout the year, they hear from an array of guest speakers, visit art galleries and complete internships with nearby organizations. They also learn about politics by hearing from elected leaders and about religion by visiting mosques, temples and churches.

Cincinnati Enquirer: Private Schools’ $400M Public Check

3/8/17 – More than $400 million was diverted this year from public schools in Ohio to private schools. The money was collected from taxpayers, pooled in state coffers and then passed through public schools and on to private institutions

Cleveland Plain Dealer:  Almost all of Ohio’s voucher cash goes to religious schools

3/13/2017 – Almost all of the money from Ohio’s main tuition voucher programs – 97 percent of it – flows to private religious schools, a Plain Dealer examination.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.  The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net). This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator. 

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Arts On Line March 13, 2017

 

OAAE Arts Online
Monday, March 13th

 

STATUS UPDATE: PROPOSED STATE OPERATING BUDGET (HB49)

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee received interested party testimony last week on Ohio’s proposed FY 2018-2019 Operating Budget (HB49).  Over a three day period, March 7th – 9th, the message from testifying education advocates was clear and consistent; the state budget would leave too many schools struggling.  Concerns included the funding caps for districts needing extra money for growing populations, not enough funds for school transportation, the cuts in tangible personal property (TPP) tax reimbursements, the over 350 school districts that will lose state funds over the next two years and the school funding formula itself.

Among many others, testimonies were heard from the Coalition for Fiscal Fairness in Ohio, Ohio Education Association (OEA), the Ohio Federation of Teachers, the Ohio School Boards Association (OSBA), the Buckeye Association of School Administrators (BASA), Ohio Association of School Business Officials (OASBO) and the Ohio Education Policy Institute.

In her testimony, OASBO Associate Executive Director, Barbara Shaner stated “It is our position that issues remain with the current calculation for determining the state and local shares of funding for schools, the State Share Index (SSI)….We agree with Governor Kasich’s stated premise that state aid should be directed based on the capacity of local districts and their communities’ ability to provide local funding. The question is whether the formula works in the appropriate way and whether districts have enough resources to serve students….We believe the current funding formula (adopted in HB64) has made progress, but falls short of this objective.” Review the full testimony of OSBA, BASA and OASBO here, as well as their recommended changes to College Credit Plus program.

Dr. Howard Fleeter of the Ohio Education Policy Institute acknowledged the state’s tight budget due to the shortfall of anticipated FY16 tax revenues but did encourage the subcommittee to consider several options for amending the current school funding formula.  He reminded lawmakers that although school funding has increased every year since the Great Depression, it has not kept pace with inflation.  Dr. Fleeter’s full testimony and recommendations can be viewed here.

The subcommittee has set public testimony on HB49 for Wednesday & Thursday, March 22 & 23rd  at 9am.  Anyone planning to testify should prepare written testimony and submit it to the subcommittee chairman’s office, Rep. Robert R. Cupp (R-Lima), via email at least 24 hours prior to the hearing.  FinanceSubPrimary&SecondaryEducationCommittee@ohiohouse.gov

Columbus Dispatch: Groups hammer home problems with school-funding plan

3/9/2017 – Education groups hammer home problems with Gov. Kasich’s school-funding plan.

Patch.com: Solon Schools Fight For Funding In Columbus

3/9/17 – As part of the Coalition of Fiscal Fairness, school district representatives argued that loss of TPP funding could cripple some districts.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Gov. John Kasich wants teachers to do business externships? He should have to job shadow at schools, Democrats say

3/7/17 –  Democrat Reps. Brigid Kelly and Kent Smith want Gov. John Kasich to job shadow teachers in Ohio public schools.

Columbus Dispatch: Answers to 20 Ohio school-funding questions you didn’t know you had (February 2017 archived article)

 

EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT  (ESSA)

The Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC), chaired by Representative Cupp, held its second meeting on ESSA March 9th.  OAAE Executive Director, Tim Katz, was among the 30 organizations who testified, encouraging the state to consider additional recommendations before submitting Ohio’s plan in April.  The OAAE testimony can be reviewed here.

Joining the voices of concerned educators and advocates, the Ohio Senate Democratic Caucus sent a letter to ODE Superintendent, Mr. Paolo DeMaria, asking that ODE take additional time to seek public input on the state’s plan adding “Since the plan was made public, we have heard from interested parties across the education spectrum who have expressed significant and specific concerns about portions of the draft. These concerns include, but are not limited to: number of tests and duration of testing; our A-F report card system and indicators within that system; accountability sub- group size; value-added growth measures (both in general and as they apply to teacher evaluations); and school improvement.  These interested parties — many of whom are the very educators who will implement this plan — have made clear that there is more work to be done. We fear that the April submission deadline does not provide for adequate time to get us where we need to be.”

Despite the requests to slow down the process and opt for the later fall 2017 submission, Ohio Department of Education (ODE) intends to move forward as planned to “give schools as much time as possible to implement changes before ESSA’s effects are first felt on the 2017-2018 state report cards.”

 We encourage all OAAE members and partners to continue to reach out to ODE Superintendent Paolo DeMaria in support of the OAAE recommendations. 

 Toledo Blade: State’s testing plan draws ire at forum

3/7/17 – Local public school advocates criticized the number of state tests students must take and called for the Ohio Department of Education to hit pause on an education plan it is crafting in response to a new federal law.

 

 

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 

Last Week’s Committee Hearings

The House Education and Career Readiness Committee met on March 7th and received testimony on two bills:

HB47 Students in the military

Bill sponsor John Boccieri hopes to see the Students to Soldiers Support Act in law to guarantee that high school and college students do not face any consequences from the school when missing extracurricular and other school activity commitments in order to keep their military obligations.

HB80 Summer food service

This bill was passed unanimously as SB247 in the last General Session but due to administrative error, did not make it into law.  Reintroduced as HB80, both of the bill sponsors described the bill as a tool to help Ohio’s hungry children by allowing school districts to make their school facilities available to an approved food service provider if more than half of their students qualify for free or reduced meals.

The Senate Education Committee met on March 8th and received testimony on:

SB34 School Years, to open for instruction after Labor Day

High August temperatures in class rooms with no air conditioning, conflicting county fair dates for 4H students and small business arguments were some reasons presented by the eight proponents testifying in favor of requiring Ohio schools to begin their school year after Labor Day.

Newly Introduced Bills:

HB: Financial Literacy (Hagan, C., McColley, R.)

Summary: To require one-half unit of financial literacy in the high school curriculum, to require the Chancellor of Higher Education to prepare an informed student document for each institution of higher education, to require the State Board of Education to include information on the informed student document in the standards and model curricula it creates for financial literacy and entrepreneurship.

 

ON THE CALENDAR – Week of March 13

Monday, March 13

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, March 14

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus.

State Board of Education Meeting

4:00 p.m. Ohio State House Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Committee

  • HB 98: Career Information 1st Hearing-Sponsor
  • HB 80: Summer food program 2nd Hearing – All testimony, possible amendments and vote

Wednesday, March 15

3:00 p.m. (Or After Session), Ohio State House Room 121

Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

  • HB49: Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget 8th Hearing, Interested Party Testimony

Thursday, March 16

9:00 am, Room 121, Chair: Cupp

Finance Subcommittee on Primary and Secondary Education

  • HB49: Creates FY 2018-2019 operating budget 9th Hearing, Interested Party Testimony

 

OHIO NEWS

Ohio House of Representatives Student Art Exhibition: Students from around Ohio took the stage last week for a ceremony honoring their work in the Ohio House of Representative Student Art Exhibition.

Lorain Morning Journal: ODE officially notifies Lorain School District of next step

3/8/2017 – The Ohio Department of Education sent letters announcing next steps in the state takeover of Lorain City Schools.

Fox News Lima: State education officials tour Glandorf HS

3/7/2017 – The Ohio State Education Superintendent and the President of the Ohio State Board of Education toured Ottawa Glandorf High School to get a better understanding of how a rural education.

Zanesville Times-Recorder:  Fine arts high school moving forward

3/7/2017 – Local educators and community members are inching closer to establishing a public fine arts school.

Columbus Dispatch: State program brings CSI to life for fourth-graders

3/3/17 – Seven schools across Ohio were pilot projects for the program, which includes activities such as solving a missing persons case and the case of stolen fertilizer. Now, all schools in the state can use the free curriculum.

Columbus Dispatch: Ohio schools must now give ACT or SAT to all juniors

2/28/2017 – Ohio’s districts and schools must now give ACT or SAT to all high school juniors.

NATIONAL NEWS

Associated Press: Senate votes to end Obama school accountability rules

3/9/17 – WASHINGTON — The Senate on Thursday voted to end an Obama effort to identify and help struggling schools and students, as President Donald Trump and Republicans work to undo some of his predecessor’s key policies.   Senators voted 50-49 to rescind accountability rules issued in November to help states implement the 2015 Every Student Succeeds Act, a law that addresses school ratings, student report cards and other ways to spot and help troubled schools. President Donald Trump is expected to sign the bill into law.

Republicans argued that the regulations were an example of federal overreach and that details of things like report cards should be left to states and local communities. Democrats defended the rules, saying they provide important safeguards for vulnerable groups of students, such as children with special needs and minorities.   “People had grown fed up with Washington telling teachers and schools, and superintendents and states, so much about what to do about our children in 100.000 public schools,” Alexander, who sponsored the measure, said on the Senate floor before the vote.

New York Times: Obama Education Rules Are Swept Aside by Congress

3/9/17 – With all the attention paid to President Trump’s lightning-rod secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, and her advocacy for private school vouchers, little public notice has been paid to the action on education in Congress — where lawmakers have broader power than Ms. DeVos to make changes to the nation’s school system.  Now, Congress has done exactly that, voting to repeal crucial regulations associated with the Every Student Succeeds Act, one of President Barack Obama’s final legislative achievements.

CNBC: America’s school facilities get a near-failing grade

3/9/17 -Most parents aren’t very happy when their children bring home a report card with anything less than a C-. They’ll be even less encouraged by the near-failing grade awarded to the nation’s school facilities Thursday by the American Society of Civil Engineers.  Close to a quarter of all public schools in America are in “fair or poor condition,” according to the group’s latest report card, which gave most of the nation’s infrastructure a near-failing grade.

 

Education Weekly: States Introduce New Measure of Accountability: Arts Education

3/7/17 – The Every Student Succeeds Act opened the doors for states to revamp their accountability systems and include new indicators of school quality.  In addition to measures like English-language proficiency, graduation rates, and scores on standardized achievement tests, which are commonly used in current accountability systems, states are required to include one “additional indicator” of school quality in their system. That could include social-emotional indicators or access to certain courses —including the arts.


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.  The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net). This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator. 

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Arts on Line Education Update March 6, 2017

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
March 6, 2017
Joan Platz

132nd GENERAL ASSEMBLY

This Week at the Statehouse:  The House and Senate will hold hearings and sessions this week.

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Cupp, will meet on March 7, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116.  The committee will receive testimony on HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget from the Coalition for Fiscal Fairness in Ohio, Sycamore City School District – Strongsville City Schools – Public Finance Resources, Inc., and St. the Bernard Elmwood Place City School District.

The House Education and Career Readiness Committee, chaired by Representative Brenner, will meet on March 7, 2017 at 4:00 PM, in hearing room 121. The committee will receive testimony on two bills:

  • HB47 (Boccieri) Students in Military would enact the “Students to Soldiers Support Act (S3A)” regarding the participation of students who are serving in the uniformed services in extracurricular activities at public and nonpublic schools and public and private colleges.
  • HB80 (LaTourette) School Food-Summer Intervention would require school districts to allow approved summer food service program sponsors to use school facilities to provide food service for summer intervention services under certain conditions.

The House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, chaired by Representative Duffey, will meet on March 8, 2017 at 11:00 AM in hearing room 115 to receive presentations from the Legislative Service Commission on higher education workforce development.

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Cupp, will meet on March 8, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116.  The committee will receive testimony on HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget from the Ohio Education Association, the Ohio Federation of Teachers, the Ohio 8, the Ohio Alliance for High Quality Education, the Ohio School Boards Association, the Buckeye Association of School Administrators, the Ohio Association for School Business Officials, and the Ohio Education Policy Institute.

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Cupp, will also meet on March 9, 2017 at 9:30 AM in hearing room 112.  The committee will receive testimony on HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget from School Choice Ohio, Agudath Israel of America (Ohio), the Catholic Conference of Ohio, the Ohio Association of Independent Schools.

The Joint Education Oversight Committee JEOC, chaired by Representative Cupp, will meet on March 9, 2017 at 1:30 PM in the South Hearing Room.  The committee will receive testimony on Ohio’s ESSA plan.

Those interested in testifying should contact Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov or (614) 466-9082.

Please e-mail testimony to Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov 24 hours prior to the meeting to ensure members have time to review materials and prepare questions.

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on March 8, 2017 at 3:15 PM in the South Hearing Room.  The committee will receive testimony on SB34 (Manning) School Years, which would require, with exceptions, public and chartered nonpublic schools to open for instruction after Labor Day.

Representative Johnson Resigns:  Representative Greta Johnson (35th House District-Akron) has submitted her resignation to the Ohio House affective at the end of March.  Representative Johnson will become the deputy director at the Department of Law, Insurance and Risk Management in the office of Summit County Executive Ilene Shapiro.  She has served in the Ohio House since 2015.

The House Democratic Caucus is charged with overseeing the process for selecting her replacement.

Legislative Update:

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, chaired by Representative Duffey, received sponsor testimony on March 1, 2017 on HB58 (Brenner, Slaby), cursive writing. The bill would require that students receive instruction in cursive handwriting in grades kindergarten through fifth grade.

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Peggy Lehner, received testimony on SB39 (Schiavoni) Community School Operations, on March 1, 2017.  The bill would strengthen accountability provisions for e-schools, which are charter schools that provide instruction online.  The bill is similar to one that Senator Schiavoni introduced in the 131st General Assembly (SB298), and includes new provisions that were discussed during hearings last year.

The bill would apply to e-schools that are not under the supervision of an elected board of education.  These schools would be required to provide, rather than offer, 920 hours of instruction to students, and keep accurate records of student participation in learning activities.  A licensed teacher would be required to certify student participation, and report that information to the Ohio Department of Education monthly.

The bill would provide an exemption, under extenuating circumstances, of the requirement that a student be automatically withdrawn for being absent for 105 hours of learning opportunities, without a legitimate excuse. The exemption would apply to a high-performing student enrolled in an e-school.

SB39 also includes a provision similar to HB87 (Roegner) Community School Public Moneys.  The provision would require the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to distribute to school districts public moneys recovered from charter schools as a result of an audit by the state or money recovered through other means.

To increase transparency, the bill requires e-school governing boards to stream online their meetings so that parents whose children are enrolled in the school, but live in other parts of the state, can monitor the school’s decisions.

The e-school would also be required to evaluate whether a student with declining achievement should stay enrolled at an online school

The bill also creates a bipartisan commission to study the actual costs of running an e-school.

Finally, the bill requires e-schools to include in any ad bought with public money a description of the school’s most recent state Report Card grade.

The Joint Education Oversight Committee (JOEC): The Joint Education Oversight Committee, chaired by Representative Cupp, met on March 2, 2017 to receive comments and recommendations about Ohio’s draft consolidated plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

Superintendents, teachers, and others presented testimony, including Robert Hlasko, Superintendent of the Cory-Rawson Local School District; Adrian Allison, Superintendent of the Canton City School District and co-chair of The Ohio 8 Coalition; J. Chris Pfister, Superintendent of the Waynesfield-Goshen Local School District;  Krista Taylor, an Intervention Specialist in the Cincinnati Public Schools; and Nichelle Harris, director of the Ohio After School Network.

Overall those testifying took issue with the claim by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) that the suggestions made in regional meetings across Ohio last fall were incorporated into the ESSA draft plan.  Some noted that Ohio has an opportunity to reboot education policy in the state as a result of the flexibility in the new federal law, and should take advantage of that opportunity.

Another recommendation would require that the ODE include in the plan a statement that Ohio will eliminate state tests that aren’t required by the federal law, and eliminate parts of the current system for evaluating Ohio’s teachers and principals.  Currently Ohio administers seven standardized state tests that are not required under federal law.

Submitting the plan to the U.S. DOE in September, 2017 was also suggested, so that there is time to develop a vision for helping Ohio students succeed.  The ODE is proposing to submit the plan on April 3, 2017.

The state Report Card was also criticized, because it relies so much on student test results to evaluate school and district performance, when schools must meet so many other needs of students to be successful.

As noted above under “This Week at the Statehouse”, the Joint Education Oversight Committee will hold another hearing on the ESSA plan on Thursday, March 9, 2017.

See http://innovationohio.org/2017/03/01/ohio-ignores-calls-for-less-testing-in-essa-plan/

More Comments About the ESSA Draft:  The Cleveland-Heights Coalition for Public Education in Cuyahoga County, also weighed in on Ohio’s draft ESSA plan. The Heights Coalition recommended the following:

  • Reduce reliance on standardized testing.  Standardized testing measures “the health of our society more than the quality of schools.”
  • Unbuckle teacher evaluations from students’ standardized test scores.  “Tying teachers’ evaluations to test scores unfairly punishes teachers who work with children in poverty. There are far more effective ways to evaluate teachers including well established peer assistance and review programs.”
  • Reject the use of a single summative score for ranking schools and school districts.  “While ESSA requires Ohio to inform the public about the state of education in our schools and school districts, it does not require combining all accountability measures into a single score. Dangerously, a single measure based on test scores penalizes schools and school districts that serve our state’s neediest children.”
  • Add an opportunity index as the fourth ESSA measure of School Quality and School District Success.  “To ensure access for all children to a well-rounded education, we propose that Ohio incorporate an Opportunity Index that affirms the schools and school districts that serve larger percentages of children living in poverty, children in their county’s social service system, children who qualify for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and English Language Learners.”

Contact the Heights Coalition for Public Education, Susie Kaeser, Convener, susankaeser@sbcglobal.net, 216-371-9201.

Bills Introduced:

HB98 (Duffey, Boggs) Career Information for Students:  Specifies that employers in a community may have opportunities to present information to students about jobs and careers.  Allows boards of education to adopt policies to regulate employer visits to schools.

HB102 (Brenner) School Funding Reform:  Representative Brenner introduced last week his comprehensive reform plan to completely revamp Ohio’s school funding system, tax structure, and voucher programs at the same time.

The proposed plan would realign Ohio’s school funding system with a concept to allow state education dollars to “follow” the student to traditional, charter, private, home, or other types of school.

The plan would also challenge local school districts by taking away their control over revenue raised locally, although property taxes would still be levied, but the money would go to the state.

The following is a summary of the bill’s provisions:

  • Replaces locally levied school district property taxes with a statewide property tax and requires recipients of certain tax exemptions to reimburse the state for such levy revenue lost due to those exemptions
  • Increases the state sales and use tax rates and allocates additional revenue to state education purposes
  • Repeals school district income taxes
  • Requires the Treasurer of State to issue general obligation bonds to refund certain school district debt obligations
  • Creates a new school funding system in which the state pays a specified amount per student, and each student may use that amount to attend the public or chartered non-public school, without the requirement of a local contribution
  • Eliminates the School Facilities Commission
  • Eliminates the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program, Pilot Project Scholarship Program, Autism Scholarship Program, and Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program
  • Eliminates interdistrict open enrollment
  • Requires educational service centers to transport students on a county-wide basis
  • Permits school districts to enter into a memoranda of understanding for one district to manage another.

HJR3 (Brenner) School District Obligations Refund:  Conditionally authorizes the issuance of state obligations to refund pending school district obligations; conditionally waives, beginning in 2020, the requirement that schools levy property taxes to pay debt charges on their obligations; and conditionally authorizes a treasury fund that is restricted exclusively to educational purposes.

SB82 (Williams, Lehner) School Absences: Requires a public school to place a telephone call within one hour of the start of the school day to a parent whose child is absent without legitimate excuse.

SB85 (Huffman) Opportunity Scholarship Program Creation:  Eliminates the Educational Choice Scholarship Pilot Program and Pilot Project Scholarship Program and creates the Opportunity Scholarship Program.

SJR3 (LaRose) State Constitutional Amendments:  Proposes to amend Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 9 of Article XI that are scheduled to take effect January 1, 2021; amend, for the purpose of adopting new section numbers as indicated in parentheses, the versions of Sections 1(2), 2(3), 3(5), 4(6), 5(7), 6(8), 7(9), 8(10), 9(11), and 10(12) of Article XI that are scheduled to take effect January 1, 2021; and enact new Sections 1 and 4 of Article XI of the Constitution of the State of Ohio to revise the redistricting process for congressional districts.

According to The Akron Beacon Journal, the bill would require the special commission that draws state legislative districts to draw the lines for Congress, if lawmakers were are unable to redraw congressional district lines by 2021 in a way that eliminates partisanship.

See “Congressional redistricting plan up for debate in Ohio,” by Doug Livingston, The Akron Beacon Journal, March 3, 2017 at http://www.ohio.com/news/local/congressional-redistricting-plan-open-for-debate-1.750818

HB49 (R. SMITH) OPERATING BUDGET

House Finance Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Perales, received testimony last week about several parts of the executive budget, HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget, including testimony from the Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Citizens for the Arts, and the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

Ohio Arts Council (OAC):  Donna Collins, executive director of the Ohio Arts Council, presented testimony about the OAC-related provisions included in HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget on February 28, 2017.

According to the testimony, the Ohio Arts Council (OAC), has worked over the past two years to fulfill its promises to award grants in all 88 counties; reach more students; connect older Ohioans with the arts; and increase arts opportunities for under-served communities. The OAC has also instituted a number of cost-savings efforts to streamline operations.

The executive budget allocates nearly $29.6 million for the arts over the biennium, which is the same amount as the last biennium, and represents 0.04 percent of the total General Revenue Fund (GRF).

The OAC has also secured a $2 million grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for seven consecutive years.

And, the OAC continues efforts to control costs while expanding services.  According to the testimony,  “Since FY 2008, the agency’s staff has been reduced by more than half, even as the need demonstrated by arts constituents increases. As a result, the OAC has lengthened its grant cycles and streamlined procedures, reducing administrative burdens on grantees and the agency itself. Over the last four fiscal years, the OAC has reduced by 4% the payroll portion of its budget, all while recognizing the parameters of the state’s bargaining agreement.”

Director Collins also described a study prepared by Bowling Green State University researchers, who found that the state’s arts sector created more than 231,000 jobs; has contributed $32 billion to the state economy; and $3.4 billion in tax revenues at all levels of government.

The arts and cultural industries in Ohio have helped create clusters of economic activity in the state; helped retain skilled workers; spurred partnerships that then lead to economic development; created entrepreneurial jobs; and supported other sectors of the state economy, including tourism.

According to the testimony, the mission of the Ohio Arts Council is to “…strengthen Ohio’s communities culturally, educationally, and economically” by adopting strategies to “invest, innovate, engage and lead,” and create a sound infrastructure to advocate and support the arts in Ohio.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-higher-education

Ohio Citizens for the Arts:  Also testifying in support of the Ohio Arts Council’s budget was Ross McGregor, a member of the Board of Directors for Ohio Citizens for the Arts (OCA), and a former member of the Ohio House.  Accompanying him were OCA executive director Bill Behrendt and Legislative Counsel Bill Blair.

Ohio Citizens for the Arts is a statewide grassroots organization that was founded in 1976 to advocate for the arts in Ohio, and increase public support and funding for the arts.

Ohio Citizens for the Arts is requesting a $4 million increase in the General Revenue Fund for the OAC ($34 million) in the operating budget. According to the testimony, this amount is just $2 million more than the amount the OAC received in FY00-01.

This increase is based on the needs of the arts and cultural industries in Ohio, and will enable the OAC to continue to serve as a driver of Ohio’s economy, and play a “crucial role in the education of young Ohioans.”

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-higher-education

The House Finance Higher Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Perales, received testimony over two days (March 1 & 2, 2017) from John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education.   The testimony focused on some of the changes included in the executive budget pertaining to the College Credit Plus (CCP) program, the cost of college/university textbooks, the proposed cap on special fees, and an increase in the State Share of Instruction.

According to the testimony, one of the goals of Governor Kasich’s executive budget proposal is to increase the educational attainment of Ohioans to meet workforce needs and maintain a healthy economy. The administration believes that 65 percent of Ohioans need to earn a post-secondary degree by 2025. In order to reach this goal, the Chancellor recommends lowering the cost of higher education for all of Ohio’s students, and expanding the options for adults who have some college coursework,to earn a degree.

Chancellor Carey said that the higher education sector has been working together through the Governor’s Task Force on Affordability and Efficiency in Higher Education to find ways to reduce costs and improve efficiencies.  As a result, the cost for higher education in Ohio is coming closer to the national average.

One of the more controversial recommendations that has been included in the executive budget proposal is a provision that requires, beginning in the 2018-2019 academic school year, public institutions of higher education to include the cost of textbooks ($300) as part of an undergraduate student’s tuition.

While some institutions of higher education in the state are opposing this provision in the executive budget, Chancellor Carey said in his testimony, that he hopes that it will become law, and motivate colleges and universities in the state to work together as they have done in other areas, to create a better way to fund textbooks.  The average cost of textbooks per year is $600 a student.

The executive budget would also require that special fees be included in the annual tuition cap, to address a situation in which some colleges and universities were increasing the special fees to compensate for the tuition cap.

The subcommittee also received an update about the proposed changes included in the executive budget for College Credit Plus program. The program replaced the Secondary Enrollment Options Program in the last biennium, but its implementation raised concerns from stakeholders, who proposed some changes that are included in the executive budget.

The program was created to provide high school students with the opportunity to earn college and high school credits at the same time, to reduce the cost of a college education.

The executive budget also includes an increase in the State Share of Instruction (SSI) by one percent in each fiscal year, and an increase of 2 percent over the biennium for the Ohio College Opportunity Grants, which support higher education costs for Ohioans with financial need.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-higher-education

House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee:  The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Cupp, continued to receive testimony last week about the executive budget, HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget for education.

Tim Keen, director of the Office of Budget and Management reviewed the key points of the executive budget for education on March 2, 2017.

According to the testimony, “The purpose of the school funding formula is to efficiently allocate state resources to school districts based on current local capacity and the current number of students.”  The proposed changes in the state aid formula in HB49 would allow the formula to work, eventually reducing reliance on the guarantee and the cap.

Director Keen noted that the funding cap prevents the formula from being fully funded, which could eventually lead to another school funding lawsuit.  For example, there are several school districts in which enrollments are increasing, or property values are decreasing, but they can’t receive the full formula amount because of the cap.  The cap is currently 7.5 percent of the state formula amount, but would decrease to 5 percent if the executive budget is adopted.

The guarantee also needs to be eliminated.  Director Keen said that the executive budget takes steps to eliminate the guarantee by making small reductions of less than $100,000 in state aid to school districts based on their lower enrollments. Of the 340 school districts that would be affected by this provision, 71 would receive cuts of $5,000 or less.

http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria repeated the testimony that he presented to the House Finance Committee on February 7, 2017.

The Ohio Department of Education is requesting a 20 percent increase in funding to support school choice programs and the increased oversight requirements included in 131-HB2 (Dovilla, Roegner).

Funds are also included to increase participation in early childhood education programs to provide support for four year olds.

And, if the executive budget is approved by the House and Senate, the ODE is committed to implementing the proposed “externships” and adding business representatives to boards of education included in HB49.

The externships provision would require teachers who are renewing their teaching licenses to complete a professional development plan that includes a business-related experience.

http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

Jason Phillips, staff supervisor for the education budget at the Legislative Service Commission, provided a rather technical and detailed explanation of the components of the state’s proposed school funding formula.  He also included in his presentation a comparison of the components of the current formula and the House proposed school funding formula included in 131-HB64 (R. Smith) the operating budget for FY16-17.

He reported that even though the per-pupil amount is not increased (currently $6,000) the State Share Index increases from 49.6 percent to 50 percent, which will increase state aid for some school districts.

The State Share Index is applied to the Opportunity Grant and other components of the school funding formula.  It accounts for both “capacity” and the “ability” of school districts to raise revenue through property taxes.  It is based on a three-year average property value and adjusts for income for certain districts, and is calculated once for both years of the biennium. The purpose of the index is to direct more state funds to districts with lower wealth, and, according to the testimony, it is doing its job, even though there are districts losing funding in both fiscal years.

The amount of state aid that school districts would receive through the formula is based mainly on property valuation and income of the residents of the school district.

While property values in urban school districts are decreasing, property values in some rural school districts are increasing due to the Current Agricultural Use Value (CAUV), which adjusts property values based on how farmland is being used.  The value of agricultural land with CAUV designation, and the value of land being used for mining shale has been increasing.  This means that the State Share Index for some rural school districts is decreasing their state aid.  Currently the Senate Ways and Means Committee is debating SB36 (Hite) Agricultural Computation to adjust the CAUV.

According to the testimony, if the valuation of property was reduced due to adjustments in the CAUV, then SSI would increase in rural school districts.

More than 300 school districts will receive some relief from decreases in state support due to temporary transitional aid (funding guarantee) in FY18 and FY19.  The base year for the guarantee was shifted from FY15 to FY17, which, according to the testimony, accounts for the increase.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

NATIONAL NEWS

President Urges Action on Vouchers:  President Trump said in his address to Congress on February 28, 2017 that, “Education is the civil rights issue of our time.” He advocated for Congress to pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth to “…choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school that is right for them.”

He also introduced Denisha Merriweather, who was in the audience.  She is now completing a master’s degree in college, but when she was younger, Denisha attended a public school and failed two grades.  She was able to receive a scholarship from the Step Up for Students program in Florida to attend a private school, which helped her to improve her grades, graduate, and eventually attend college.

Step Up for Students is a nonprofit organization that distributes scholarships to students to attend private secular and religious schools in Florida.  The funds are raised from individuals and corporations that receive a tax credit for donating to the scholarship fund.

In response to the President’s reference to Denisha’s story, education reporters are speculating that he might make his $20 billion promise to expand school choice programs a reality by creating a national program based on giving corporations who donate to private school scholarship programs a federal tax credit as part of the tax code overhaul.  This way a bill could pass in the Senate with only a majority vote.

According to Andrew Ujifusa at Education Week, the Step Up for Students program is one of 17 state tax-credit scholarships programs in the nation. The courts have found, depending on state laws, that these programs don’t violate the separation of church and state principle, because the funds are passed through a nonprofit organization to private secular and religious schools, rather than coming directly from the government.

Opponents of the tax-credit scholarship plan believe that passing public funds through a nonprofit organization to be used to fund religious schools doesn’t change the fact that the money was originally public, and should be used for public purposes, in a transparent way, with public oversight and accountability.

See “Trump invited a student to his joint address.  Her story says a lot about his views on education reform,” by Emma Brown, The Washington Post, February 28, 2017

See “Trump’s School Choice Plan:  Religious Fundamentalism At Taxpayer Expense,” by Jeff Bryant, Education Opportunity Network, March 2, 2017 at

http://educationopportunitynetwork.org/trumps-school-choice-plan-religious-fundamentalism-at-taxpayer-expense/

See “Donald Trump’s Congress Speech,” February 28, 2017 at  http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/28/politics/donald-trump-speech-transcript-full-text/

See “Two Possible Paths for a Tax-Credit School Choice Plan in Congress” by

Andrew Ujifusa, Education Week, March 2, 2017 at

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2017/03/tax_credit_school_choice_plan_congress_path.html?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=campaignk-1

OHIO NEWS

More School Districts Invoicing for Charter School Payments:  Elida School District Treasurer Joel Parker writes in The Lima News that the Elida School Board recently approved a resolution to invoice the Ohio Department of Education for $3.07 million to cover local funding diverted to charter schools.

Elida is following the actions of several other Ohio school districts, that are invoicing charter schools for funds deducted from their state accounts for students attending charter schools.

In most cases the amount of state aid a district receives is less than the per pupil amount, because state aid is adjusted for district wealth.  However, charter schools receive the full per pupil amount.  When the full amount is deducted from the school district’s state account, it leaves a gap in school district revenue, which school districts make-up by using local tax dollars.

According to the article, the current system of funding charter schools is a form of taxation without representation, because local voters have no say in how charter schools operate or spend public dollars. “Public schools have a great fiduciary responsibility to make sure tax dollars are spent with the proper purpose. When the local dollars flow elsewhere, the school and taxpayers have no control over how it is used.”

The article concludes by recommending that, there should be a discussion about making all schools that receive public taxpayer money accountable, rather than the discussion about school choice.

See “Taxation with representation,” by Joel Parker, Guest Column, Lima News, February 25, 2017 at http://limaohio.com/opinion/columns/231900/joel-parker-taxation-without-representation

FYI ARTS

The Ohio Arts Council and the Ohio Citizens for the Arts Foundation will celebrate Arts Day and the winners of the Governor’s Awards for the Arts on May 17, 2017 in Columbus, Ohio.

The celebration starts with a Kickoff Event at the Vern Riffe Center for Government & the Arts in Studio Two at 9:00 AM.  This will be followed by legislative visits with members of the Ohio House and Senate.

The Governor’s Awards for the Arts Luncheon starts at 12:00 PM in the Columbus Athenaeum.  Winners of the awards will receive an original work of art by textile artist and 2016 Governor’s Award winner Janice Lessman-Moss.

This year the recipients of the Governor’s Awards for the Arts include the following individuals and organizations:

  • Arts Administration, Raymond Bobgan – Cleveland
  • Arts Education, Jill McCutcheon – Dayton
  • Arts Education, Students Motivated by the Arts (SMARTS)-Youngstown
  • Arts Patron, Puffin Foundation West, LTD.- Columbus
  • Business Support of the Arts (Large), Promedica – Toledo
  • Business Support of the Arts (Small), Peoples Bank – Marietta
  • Community Development and Participation, Linda Stone – Columbus
  • Individual Arts, C. F. Payne – Lebanon
  • The Irma Lazarus Award, Procter & Gamble – Cincinnati

To register for Arts Day and the luncheon go to http://www.ohiocitizensforthearts.org/upcoming-events

Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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ACTION ALERT Regarding Ohio’s Draft Consolidated Plan to Implement the Every Student Succeeds Act

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education has submitted a detailed memo to the Superintendent, the members of the State Board of Education, and the Joint Education Oversight Committee with feedback and recommendations in response to the Ohio Department of Education’s draft Consolidated State Plan for ESSA. We would like your help with additional messaging.


FOR YOUR IMMEDIATE ACTION:

Request that the following recommendations proposed by the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education be included in Ohio’s Consolidated Plan to implement the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

This Action Alert should be addressed to Paolo DeMaria, Superintendent of Public Instruction.  Please see this sample letter, which can be mailed or emailed.


CONTACT:

Paolo DeMaria
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Ohio Department of Education
25 South Front Street
Columbus, OH 43215
877-644-6338

superintendent@education.ohio.gov


MESSAGE:

Request that the following recommendations be included in Ohio’s Plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. (You can use this sample letter, or draft your own.)

1) ODE Leadership and Support for a Well-Rounded Education

The Ohio Department of Education (Department) should indicate throughout Ohio’s Consolidated ESSA Plan that it is taking a leadership role to encourage local education agencies (LEAs) to use federal funds to support student access to and achievement of a well-rounded education.  This includes encouraging LEAs through guidance, technical assistance, and professional development.

2) Use Data to Verify a Well-Rounded Education

To document that all students have access to a well-rounded education, Ohio’s Consolidated ESSA plan should state that the Department will annually publish data about student enrollment in all courses, including integrated courses, aligned to Ohio’s Learning Standards at each grade level for each school, each school district, and for the State.

3) A New Measure of School Quality and Student Success

Ohio’s consolidated ESSA plan should include a measure based on “The Educators in Your District” data as an indicator of School Quality and Student Success on the Report Card and in Ohio’s accountability system for schools, rather than chronic absenteeism and discipline, which is another measure of poverty.

“The Educators in Your District” measure would recognize school districts and schools that are supporting a well-rounded education and are meeting the diverse needs of students through engagement with arts and music teachers, physical education teachers, school librarians, school nurses, school social workers, school counselors, and teachers of gifted students.


BACKGROUND:

The Ohio Department of Education released in early February 2017 a draft of Ohio’s consolidated plan for implementing the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

ESSA was signed into law in December 2015, and reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and replaces the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

ESSA includes major sources of federal funding for State Education Agencies (SEAs) and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and policy changes that affect preK-12 education programs under Titles I-VIII.

Ohio’s Consolidated ESSA Plan includes long term goals, objectives, and strategies to implement the federal law, and requires the State and LEAs to say how the State will manage Title funds; assess academic achievement; ensure accountability; provide support for low performing schools; support excellent educators, and provide a well-rounded education for all students.

Ohio’s draft Consolidated ESSA Plan is available for public comment on the ODE web site until March 6, 2017.

 

THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY – FYI – TO EXPLAIN EACH OF THE ACTION ITEMS:

1) Leadership and Support for a Well-Rounded Education

The OAAE believes that there are many opportunities for Ohio’s ESSA Plan to directly support arts education programs, and overall, we had hoped that there would be more emphasis in the consolidated plan about ESSA’s support for a well-rounded education, including the arts.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) approved in 1965 was part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty” and above all, represented a commitment to equal access to quality education programs and the complete curriculum for all children.

ESSA supports efforts to achieve this goal by providing States and LEAs with the financial resources and policy support to make it possible for students to achieve more than standards in reading, math, and science.

Under Title VIII 8002 Definitions (52) a well-rounded education means “…courses, activities, and programming in subjects such as English, reading, or language arts, writing, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, geography, computer science, music, career and technical education, health, physical education, and any other subject, as determined by the State or local educational agency.”

Ohio’s ESSA plan first addresses support for a well-rounded education in Section 6: Well-Rounded and Supportive Education for Students, on page 93.

The OAAE recommends that the Ohio Department of Education (Department) take a leadership role throughout the consolidated plan to encourage school districts that are struggling, due to lack of adequate resources and other factors, to provide all students with an ambitious, engaging, and well-rounded curriculum as defined in the law.

Ohio’s consolidated plan should state that the Department will provide guidance, technical assistance, and professional development to support LEAs increase student access to a well-rounded education that meets students needs, and prepares them for continuing education, careers, and citizenship in the 21st Century.

As an example, the Department could provide guidance and encouragement to LEAs to do the following under ESSA:

  • Engage arts education programs to prepare students to achieve course of study objectives in the arts and improve student achievement in low performing schools (Title 1 Part A Subpart 1, Sections 1008 and 1009)
  • Engage arts education programs to improve student achievement in schools under comprehensive and targeted support (Title 1 Part A Subpart 1, Sections 1008 and 1009)
  • Engage arts-based instructional strategies to close achievement gaps among demographic subgroups of students (Title 1 Part A Subpart 1, Sections 1008 and 1009)
  • Use federal funds to support arts education programs (Title 1 Part A Subpart 1, Section 1006)
  • Create or revise district-level assessments in the arts; expand assessments to include multiple measures of learning in the arts; and ensure that learning in the arts is assessed throughout the year with formative, interim, and summative assessments. (Title I, Part B, Section 1201)

An education in and through the arts is becoming a significant factor in preparing students to be successful in the 21st Century.  That’s because courses in the arts or integrated arts experiences prepare students to use innovative and imaginative ways to solve problems, and help students hone skills in communication, critical thinking, creativity, team work, and persistence. The arts prepare students with the skills that give them an added edge in a global and competitive economy.  (See American Institutes of Research, College and Career Readiness Center, Impact of Arts Education on College and Career Readiness:  Briefing Overview.)

 

2) Use Data to Verify a Well-Rounded Education

Title IV, Part A, Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants are designed to, in part, support districts and schools to “provide all students with access to a well-rounded education” (Title IV, Part A, Section 4101).

According to the ESSA template, Ohio’s state plan should describe strategies and uses of funds, “…to ensure that all children have a significant opportunity to meet challenging State academic standards and career and technical standards, as applicable, and attain, at a minimum, a regular high school diploma.”

As one of the requirements to receive funding under this new program, districts must conduct a needs assessment to identify how they currently support a well-rounded education and the areas for improvement.

According to the draft consolidated plan, the State will support LEAs to provide equitable access to a well-rounded education and rigorous coursework in subjects identified in Title VIII Section 8002 through implementation and revision of Ohio’s Learning Standards and model curricula in nine subject areas:  English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, world languages, fine arts, technology, financial literacy and physical education.

Currently there is no published data in Ohio to document student engagement in Ohio’s Learning Standards in all subjects and at each grade level, although the data is collected through Ohio’s Education Management Information System, and has, in the past, been available upon request.  Therefore, there is no publicly accessible data to prove that all students have access to a well-rounded education based on the existence of Ohio’s Learning Standards and model curricula.

For example, when the OAAE conducted an analysis of student participation in arts courses in 2014, we found that 49 school districts (8 percent) did not report student enrollment in arts courses at all grade levels 1-12 in 2010-2013, and the number of school districts reporting grade levels without enrollment in the arts courses was increasing. (Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, draft report, Comparison of Arts Data for Traditional Public Schools

for School Years 2010-2013, by Mary Hamann, Tyler Hirokawa, and Joan Platz, April 24, 2014.)

To receive a grant under this section (Title IV, Part A, Subpart 1), LEAs must conduct a needs assessment to identify gaps within well-rounded education opportunities, safe and healthy students, and the effective use of technology, and submit a plan to the state outlining the programs and initiatives that the district will use to address these gaps.

The OAAE therefore recommends that this section be amended on page 93 (before the links to Ohio’s Learning Standards) to include the following:

To document that all students have access to a well-rounded education, Ohio’s Consolidated ESSA plan should state that the Department will annually publish data about student enrollment in all courses, including integrated courses, aligned to Ohio’s Learning Standards at each grade level for each school, each school district, and for the State.

 

3) A New Measure of School Quality and Student Success

Chronic Absenteeism and Discipline

Pages 13 and 39

The State proposes in the draft consolidated plan to determine student engagement by measuring chronic absenteeism and discipline as one of the new indicators of School Quality and Student Success in Ohio’s accountability system.  The chronic absenteeism and school discipline measure would be incorporated into the Indicators Met measure in the Achievement Component on the Report Card.

According to the draft consolidated plan, the statewide average for chronic absenteeism is 15.8 percent, and is “…most severe in Ohio’s urban districts and those that are rural with a high percentage of students in poverty.”

The chronic absenteeism rate of economically disadvantaged students is “more that two and a half times the rate of their non-disadvantaged peers,” and “disabled students have a rate that is 1.6 times the rate for non-disabled students.”

Being so highly correlated with poverty, it would seem that LEAs are already implementing strategies to increase student attendance and reduce chronic absenteeism and discipline in their efforts to improve report card ratings in academic achievement, graduation rate, and closing the achievement gap among students who are disadvantaged and students with disabilities.

The OAAE recommends that a measure of School Quality and Student Success recognize school districts and schools that are supporting a well-rounded education and are meeting the diverse needs of students, rather than including another measure of poverty in Ohio’s accountability system for schools.

For example, the “Educators in Your District” data included on the most recent Ohio report card show that school districts employ a number of educators who work to meet the academic, social, cultural, and health needs of students.  These educators include fine arts and music teachers, physical education teachers, library media specialists, school nurses, school counselors, school social workers, gifted specialists, and more.  They all contribute to increased student, educator, parent, and community engagement in the schools, and support a positive school environment and student success.

Other states are including student access to a well-rounded education as a measure of School Quality or Student Success.  Massachusetts will include as an accountability measure the percentage of students in a school district and in high school that enroll in each of the four core course areas (English, math, science and social science), at least one foreign language, and at least one arts course in a school year.  (See page 17 of the Massachusetts Consolidated Plan.)


Thank you for participating in this Action Alert. 

Please notify OAAE if you receive a response from the Superintendent’s Office.

For more information about Ohio’s draft Consolidated ESSA Plan, visit: www.education.ohio.gov.

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Arts on Line Education Update February 27, 2017

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
February 27, 2017
Joan Platz

132nd OHIO GENERAL ASSEMBLY

This Week at the Statehouse: The Ohio House will hold hearings and sessions this week.  The Ohio Senate will just hold committee meetings.

The House Finance: Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Bob Cupp, will meet on March 1, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116.  The subcommittee will receive testimony from the Legislative Service Commission about the school funding provisions in the executive budget, HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget.  See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

The House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, chaired by Representative Duffey, will meet on March 1, 2017 at 10:00 AM in hearing room 115.  The committee will receive testimony on HB58 (Brenner, Slaby) Cursive Handwriting, which would require instruction in cursive writing in grades kindergarten through fifth grade, “to ensure that students develop the ability to print letters and words legibly by third grade and to create readable documents using legible cursive handwriting by the end of fifth grade.”

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/higher-education-and-workforce-development

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, will meet on March 1, 2017 at 1:30 PM in the South Hearing Room.  The committee will consider the confirmation of Governor Kasich’s appointee Laura Kohler to the State Board of Education, and receive testimony on two bills, SB8 (Gardner, Terhar) School Infrastructure and Technology and SB39 (Schiavoni) Community School Operation.

The House Finance: Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Bob Cupp, will meet on March 1, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116.  The subcommittee will receive testimony from several agencies and organizations about the school funding and education policy provisions in the executive budget, HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget.  Testimony will be presented by the Office of Budget and Management, Ohio Department of Education, KnowledgeWorks, the College Board, and ACT

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

JEOC to Hold Hearings on Ohio’s ESSA Plan:  The Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC), chaired by Representative Cupp, will hold hearings on Ohio’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).  The meetings will be held on March 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM and March 9, 2017 at 1:30 PM in the Senate’s South Hearing Room.

According to Superintendent Paolo DeMaria, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) expects to submit its ESSA plan to the U.S. Department of Education (U.S. DOE) on April 3, 2017, to ensure that there is enough time for approval, and enough time for Ohio’s schools and districts to implement the plan for the 2017-18 school year.

Those interested in testifying should contact Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov or (614) 466-9082 and indicate a date preference.

Please email testimony to Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov 24 hours prior to the meeting to ensure members have time to review materials and prepare questions.

See http://jeoc.ohio.gov

Legislative Update

The House Finance Committee approved on February 23, 2017 HB26 (McColley) Transportation Budget. The bill would make appropriations for programs related to transportation and public safety for the biennium beginning July 1, 2017, and ending June 30, 2019, and provide authorization and conditions for the operation of those programs. The allocation for the Ohio Department of Transportation would be $3.31 billion in FY18 and $3.19 billion in FY19.

The Ohio House and Senate also adopted resolutions last week to hold the governor’s annual State of the State Address in Sandusky, OH on April 4th at 7:00 PM at the historic Sandusky State Theatre.

Bills Introduced:

HB74 (Huffman, Gavarone) Increase College Tax Deduction:  To increase the maximum income tax deduction for contributions to the state’s 529 college savings program from $2,000 to $3,000 per beneficiary per year.

HB80 (Latourette, Smith) School Food-Summer Intervention:  To require school districts to allow approved summer food service program sponsors to use school facilities to provide food service for summer intervention services under certain conditions.

HB87 (Roegner) Community School Public Moneys:  Requires the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to distribute public moneys recovered from charter schools as a result of an audit by the state in certain ways.

(A) If the finding for recovery resulted from an audit of the enrollment records of the school, the funds shall be credited to the state education aid of the school district or districts from which the funding was deducted.

(B) If the finding for recovery resulted from an audit that is not described in division (A) of this section, the funds shall be redistributed to the school districts in which the students who were enrolled in the school at the time the finding for recovery is issued were entitled to attend school under section 3313.64 or 3313.65 of the Revised Code. The amount distributed to each school district under division (B) of this section shall be proportional to the district’s share of the total enrollment in the school at the time the finding for recovery is issued.

HJR2 (Hagen, Patmon) Convention of States Application:  Proposes that the Ohio General Assembly apply to the Congress of the United States for a Convention of the States under Article V of the Constitution of the United States that is limited to proposing amendments that impose fiscal restraints on the federal government, limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, and limit the terms of office for its officials and Members of Congress.

SJR1 (Huffman) Federal Constitutional Amendment Convention:  Proposes that the Ohio General Assembly apply to the Congress of the United States for a Convention of the States under Article V of the Constitution of the United States that is limited to proposing amendments that impose fiscal restraints on the federal government, limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, and limit the terms of office for its officials and Members of Congress.

 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Tom Gunlock Resigns from the SBE: Former State Board of Education President Tom Gunlock resigned from the State Board on February 23, 2017.  Governor Kasich announced on February 24, 2017 the selection of Kara Morgan of Dublin, OH as his replacement.  Ms. Morgan is an analytics experts with Battelle Memorial Institute, and an adjunct professor at Ohio State University’s John Glenn College of Public Affairs. Her term will end on December 31, 2018.

 

OHIO NEWS

Public Meeting Airs Concerns About Testing: The Northwest/West Central Ohio Public School Advisory Network held a meeting in Bath Elementary School, (Bath Local School District, Lima, OH) on February 22, 2017.  The organization of more than 50 area school districts came together to discuss the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) consolidated plan, which the ODE released in draft form for public comment.

According to the Lima News, most of the participants expressed concern about the testing provisions in the plan and the number of tests that students will take above those required in the federal law.  Participants also were concerned that the tests cannot be used to inform instruction, because the results are returned too late in the school year.

The Northwest/West Central Ohio Public School Advisory Network is recommending that the legislature reduce the number of state standardized tests from 24 to 17, and want the results to be available earlier, so that teachers can determine how to improve instruction.  They would also like to eliminate the ACT and SAT as an indicator of college and career readiness; stop tying end of course tests to graduation; and eliminate the use of student growth measures in the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System.

See “Group seeks major changes,” by Lance Mihm, The Lima News, February 22, 2017 at

http://limaohio.com/news/231433/school-group-seeks-major-changes

Educators, Lawmakers, and Public Meet to Discuss ESSA: About 150 people attended a public meeting in Avon, Ohio on February 22, 2017 to discuss Ohio’s ESSA consolidated plan.

Patrick O’Donnell of The Plain Dealer reports that participants included teachers, parents, school administrators, school board members, city officials from Lorain and western Cuyahoga counties, members of the State Board of Education, and several lawmakers.

Most opposed the number of state standardized tests and testing requirements included in the ESSA plan.  Participants said that stakeholders told the ODE in meetings about ESSA last fall that they wanted fewer tests.

According to the article, some participants also said that the State should delay submitting the consolidated plan to the U.S. DOE.  A committee appointed by Superintendent DeMaria is reviewing Ohio’s graduation requirements, and expects to finalize its recommendations in April 2017.  Some at the meeting suggested that the State Superintendent submit the plan in September 2017 in order to include those recommendations in Ohio’s plan.

See “Measuring public education Parents, officials complain state ignores calls to ax tests,” by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, February 23, 2017 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/02/halt_ohios_essa_plan_until_sta.html

Lawmakers Skeptical About Governor’s Externship Proposal: Jim Siegel from The Columbus Dispatch reported on February 22, 2017 that some lawmakers agree with representatives of Ohio’s two teachers’ union and oppose requiring teachers to complete business “externships” to renew their teachers’ licenses.

The article says that, “Republican leaders of the state House and Senate expressed opposition Wednesday to the plan, which Kasich proposed as part of his two-year operating budget as a way to strengthen ties between educators and businesses.”

The governor’s Executive Workforce Board had recommended that teachers spend time learning about the business world as part of their required professional development so that they could increase the employability skills of their students.

According to the article, both House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and Senate President Larry Obhoff believe that the requirement would put “more obstacles in teachers’ paths.”

Both the Ohio Education Association and the Ohio Federation of Teachers also question mandating the “externship” requirement for all teachers, and also questioned how it would be implemented.

See “Leaders oppose teacher ‘externship’ plan,” by Jim Siegel The Columbus Dispatch, February 22, 2017 at http://www.dispatch.com/news/20170222/gop-legislative-leaders-dont-like-kasichs-teacher-externship-plan

Higher Education Reforms Not Working: The Ohio Conference of the American Association of University Professors released last week a report entitled Education First 2017 Ohio Higher Education Report by John McNay, Sara Kilpatrick, Patty Goedl, Marty Kich, Steve Mockabee, and members of the OCAAUP Board.

According to the report, some of the reforms for higher education that have been implemented in Ohio over the past years are making things worse.

The report states, “The popular idea that public colleges and universities should operate more like the private sector is deeply flawed and causes more problems than it is alleviating.  The move toward a corporate model has not proven access, affordability, educational quality, or institutional finances.”

As a result of the new reforms, higher education institutions, faculty, students, and families in Ohio face many more obstacles:

Performance Based Budgeting Model:  Although state funding increased in the last biennium, Ohio is still spending less on higher education than it did six years ago.  The cost of a degree has priced some students out of a college education. About 68 percent of Ohio graduates have debt, which averages just under $30,000 per student.

-The criteria of the state share formula was developed by college and university presidents without the input from the faculty, and harms most institutions of higher education in the state.  Under the new funding formula institutions of higher education have become more selective and serve a larger market, including out-of-state and foreign students; regional campuses are struggling financially; and fewer dollars are being directed to financially needy students and the classroom to support the primary mission of the university.

-To keep costs low, colleges and universities are hiring part-time faculty.

-Faculty feel pressure to pass students to boost course completion and graduation rates, thus creating a degree with less value, and graduates who are not prepared for their careers.

The Ohio College Opportunity Grant:  Less prepared and low-income students have been affected by decreases in the Ohio College Opportunity Grant.

College Credit Plus and Competency Based Education:  New initiatives such as College Credit Plus are increasing the problem of administrative bloat.

-The College Credit Plus (CCP) program is not cheaper, but just shift costs from parents to colleges, universities, high schools, and tax payers.  CCP courses taught by high-school teachers do not mean that students have learned at a college level.

-Competency-based education, in which college credit is given for demonstrated work skills and knowledge, undermines the value of the college degree.

Spending on Construction and Athletics:  Spending on athletics and construction to attract students from higher income levels is reducing funds that should go to instruction.  While Ohio State University’s athletics budget is fully self-supporting, other state universities subsidize their athletics program, ranging from 44 percent at the University of Cincinnati to 82 percent at Cleveland State.

-The collective debt of state colleges and universities has more than doubled since 2005.

The report includes the following recommendations:

-Increase funding for SSI and OCOG to provide more opportunities to all Ohioans, especially those with fewer means.

-Enhance financial support for the state’s 23 community colleges and 24 regional campuses to better support struggling students while maintaining quality higher education programs in Ohio.

-Require members of boards of trustees to meet certain criteria, including experience running public or nonprofit institutions, and require that the boards include faculty members or retired faculty members.

-Gradually convert adjunct positions to full-time jobs.

-Increase the transparency of public institutions regarding how student tuition and fees are spent.

-Assess the recent tax changes and subsequent revenue shortages at the state level.  Create a tax system that is fair and generates the revenue necessary to adequately fund education at all levels.

-Engage with faculty who do the core work of the universities, and include them in efforts to develop solutions.

This is the second report issued by the OCAAUP to influence the Ohio General Assembly as it considers the state’s operating budget for FY18-19, HB49 (R. Smith).  The OCAAUP will advocate that lawmakers use the recommendations in the report to increase funding for Ohio’s institutions of higher education, and change policies that undermine the purpose of higher education.

The report is available at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B87gjJujNjELcWtuSnZ3U2tIb1U/view

 

REPORTS

Reports Show Poor Results for School Voucher Programs:  Kevin Carey at the New York Times provides an overview of student achievement in school voucher programs as the Trump administration contemplates a $20 billion federal voucher program.

According to the article, three recent studies of student achievement in voucher programs in Indiana (2015), Louisiana (February, 2016), and Ohio (July, 2016) show that in some cases students who attend a private school using a voucher actually experience a loss in student achievement compared to similar students attending public schools.

The Louisiana study found, for example, “large negative results in both reading and math. Public elementary school students who started at the 50th percentile in math and then used a voucher to transfer to a private school dropped to the 26th percentile in a single year. Results were somewhat better in the second year, but were still well below the starting point.”

Researchers studying voucher programs were surprised that the results were so consistently bad.  But the article notes that the results have so far not deterred President Trump or his Secretary for Education, Betsy DeVos, from changing their views about expanding vouchers.

See “Dismal Voucher Results Surprise Researchers as DeVos Era Begins,” by Kevin Carey, The New York Times, February 23, 2017 at https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/23/upshot/dismal-results-from-vouchers-surprise-researchers-as-devos-era-begins.html?_r=0

See “How Has the Louisiana Scholarship Program Affected Students?  A Comprehensive Summary of Effects After Two Years,” by Jonathan N. Mills, Anna J. Egalite, and Patrick J. Wolf, Education Research Alliance for New Orleans, February 22, 2016 at http://educationresearchalliancenola.org/files/publications/ERA-Policy-Brief-Public-Private-School-Choice-160218.pdf

See “Evaluation of Ohio’s EdChoice Scholarship Program:  Selection, Competition, and Performance Effects,” by David Figlio and Krzysztof Karbownik, Thomas B. Fordham Institute, July 2016 at https://edex.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/publication/pdfs/FORDHAM%20Ed%20Choice%20Evaluation%20Report_online%20edition.pdf

 

FYI ARTS

Time to Get Creative:  Melissa Weatherwax writes that, “Our world is vastly different and yet we continue to educate students for one that was current in previous decades.”

She laments that what matters still in schools is test score results and conformity, “dismissing the value of creativity, critical thinking, and innovation.”

She remembers a 2006 TedTalk given by Sir Ken Robinson that described how the parts of human brain interact to create new ideas.

Students need to have schools that “…cultivate creativity, thinking, challenges, ambiguity and risk.”  Students should have opportunities to ask questions and think critically to find answers.  And, learning spaces need to reflect the world that students will enter one day.

She writes, “It is our responsibility, not our choice, to empower students with collaborative and creative opportunities, to connect them with the world, to make meaning and think critically and provide them more real world situations. They aren’t often encouraged to think independently, to challenge ideas, or to risk an opinion that might be contrary to what is being required.”

According to Sir Ken Robinson, change can be nurtured anywhere and at anytime by an impassioned individual.  Creating schools that inspire and support creativity is already happening in some of the schools mentioned in the article.  These are schools in which teachers take risks to encourage their students to express themselves in different ways and challenge their own ideas and ways of thinking.

The author encourages teachers everywhere to do the same, because, in Sir Robinson’s words, “My contention is all kids have incredible talents and we squander them, pretty ruthlessly.  Creativity now is as important, in education, as Literacy and we should treat it with the same status.”

See “11 Years Later, Would Sir Ken Robinson Find Creativity in Our Schools,” by Melissa Weatherwax, Education Week, February 23, 2017 at http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2017/02/11_years_later_would_sir_ken_robinson_find_creativity_in_our_schools.html?cmp=eml-enl-eu-news3


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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Arts on Line Education Update February 21, 2017

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
Arts on Line Education Update
February 21, 2017
Joan Platz

 

132nd OHIO GENERAL ASSEMBLY

This Week at the Statehouse: The House and Senate will hold sessions and committee meetings this week.

The House Finance Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee, chaired by Representative Bob Cupp, will meet on February 22 & 23, 2017. This subcommittee will examine in detail Governor Kasich’s K-12 budget recommendations included in HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget, and make  recommendations to the full Finance Committee about policies and amendments that should be made to the bill.  The subcommittee includes Representatives Bob Cupp (R), Bill Reineke (R), Louis Blessing III (R), Adam Miller (D), and John Patterson (D).

On February 22, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 116, the subcommittee will receive testimony from the Legislative Service Commission about the school funding provisions in the executive budget, and also receive testimony from the Casino Control Commission; the Commission on Service and Volunteerism; the Lottery Commission; and the Joint Education Oversight Committee.

On February 23, 2017 at 9:00 AM in hearing room 121, the subcommittee will receive testimony from the Broadcast Educational Media Commission; the Board of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology; the School for the Blind; the School for the Deaf; and the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-primary-and-secondary-education

The House Finance Higher Education Subcommittee will review in more detail the provisions in the executive budget regarding higher education and the proposed budgets of several other state agencies.  The subcommittee will make recommendations to the full Finance Committee about policy changes and amendments to the bill as introduced.  The subcommittee includes Representatives Rick Perales (R), Marlene Anielski (R), Mike Duffey (R), Daniel Ramos (D), and Nickie Antonio (D).

The subcommittee will meet on February 23, 2017 at 12:00 PM in hearing room 114 and receive testimony from the Ohio Arts Council and Ohio Citizens for the Arts on HB49 (R. Smith) Operating Budget.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/finance-subcommittee-on-higher-education

JEOC to Hold Hearings on ESSA Plan: The Joint Education Oversight Committee (JEOC), chaired by Representative Cupp, will hold hearings on Ohio’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).  The meetings will be held on March 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM and March 9, 2017 at 1:30 PM in the Senate South Hearing Room.

According to Superintendent Paolo DeMaria, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) expects to submit its ESSA plan to the U.S. Department of Education (U.S. DOE) on April 3, 2017, to ensure that there is enough time for federal approval, and enough time for Ohio’s schools and districts to implement the plan for the 2017-18 school year.

Those interested in testifying before the JEOC should contact Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov or (614) 466-9082 and indicate a date preference.

Please email testimony to Haley Phillippi at haley.phillippi@jeoc.ohio.gov 24 hours prior to the meeting.

See http://jeoc.ohio.gov

Community Forum on ESSA: The Ohio Public School Advisory Network will host a Community Forum in the Avon City School District on February 22, 2017 to discuss Ohio’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The Community Forum is set for 7:00 PM at Avon High School, 37545 Detroit Road in Avon.

The Ohio Public School Advocacy Network was formed two years ago to provide Ohioans with a stronger voice in shaping statewide education policy.  The network includes 140 school districts from across the state.

The Community Forum will provide citizens in northeast Ohio with an opportunity to respond to the proposed state ESSA plan, which the ODE released in January 2017.  The ODE is currently accepting comments about the proposed plan until March 6, 2017 at http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Every-Student-Succeeds-Act-ESSA

See “Community Forum Set for February 22, 2017,” by Corky O’Callaghan, February 13, 2017 at http://corkyocallaghan.com/category/ohio-public-school-advocacy-network/

Legislative Update

The House Education and Career Readiness Committee, chaired by Representative Andy Brenner, met on February 14, 2017, and received sponsor testimony on HB21 (Community School Enrollment Verification) from Representative Stephen Hambley.

The bill would require community schools to identify and report information about the districts of residence for their students, which will be used to accurately determine the source of funding for those students.  Currently school districts are required to identify the residence district so that funding for the student can be transferred from a district’s state account to the charter school.  But, districts don’t have a relationship or contact with students attending charter schools, making this task difficult, especially if the school district doesn’t know that the student has moved to a different school district during the school year.

The committee also received sponsor testimony on HB37 (School Safety Structures) from Representative Steve Arndt.  Last year he introduced a similar bill that would have required the Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC) to create a program that allowed school districts with low priority for funding through the Classroom Facilities Assistance Program to receive funding for technology and safety upgrades.

Provisions of the bill were amended last year into 131-SB3 (Faber, Hite), which became law, but the purpose of the bill was changed.  The law now requires the OSFC to develop a proposal to provide funding for technology and safety for districts that haven’t participated in the OSFC Classroom Facilities Assistance Program, rather than require the program to be implemented.

This bill is the same as the original, in that it requires the OFSC to establish a funding program to support technology and safety, rather than just propose one.  School districts that apply for the funding would no longer be eligible for funding through OSFC Classroom Facilities Assistance Program.

See http://www.ohiohouse.gov/committee/education-and-career-readiness

The Senate Education Committee, chaired by Senator Lehner, met on February 15, 2017 and received testimony on SB8 (Gardner, Terhar) Accelerate School Facilities Program.

This bill is similar to HB37 (Arndt) School Safety Structures, in that it would require the OFSC to establish a program to allow school districts with low priority for funding through the Classroom Facilities Assistance Program to receive funding for technology and safety upgrades.

The Senate Committee also received sponsor testimony on SB34 (Manning) School Year, which requires school districts and chartered nonpublic schools to start the school year after Labor Day.  Boards of education can opt out of the requirement by approving a resolution.

See http://ohiosenate.gov/committee/education#

State of the State Address: Governor Kasich has submitted his request to the Ohio House and Senate to present the annual State of the State Address on April 4, 2017 at the historic Sandusky State Theatre in Sandusky, Ohio.

The governor is continuing his tradition of holding the State of the State Address outside of Columbus.  Past speeches have been held in Steubenville, Lima, Medina, Wilmington, and Marietta.

The request for the Ohio General Assembly to convene outside of the Statehouse must be approved by both the House and Senate.

Bills Introduced

  • HB58 (Brenner, Slaby) Cursive Handwriting Instruction:  Requires instruction in cursive handwriting.
  • HB66 (Young) Tenured Teaching Requirements:  Requires permanently tenured state university or college faculty members to teach at least three credit hours of undergraduate courses per semester.
  • SB54 (Brown, Lehner) Summer Food Programs:  Requires school districts to allow approved summer food service program sponsors to use school facilities to provide food service for summer intervention services under certain conditions.
  • SR37 (Skindell) Citizens United-Amendment:  To call on legislators at the state and federal level and other communities and jurisdictions to support an amendment to the United States Constitution that would abolish corporate personhood and the doctrine of money as speech.

 

OHIO NEWS

Educators Recommend Changes in ESSA Plan: Patrick O’Donnell at The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that a group of superintendents and other educators in northern Ohio are asking the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) to make changes in Ohio’s proposed plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

The educators question why Ohio’s ESSA plan does not reflect the views of a majority of stakeholders, who participated in surveys and meetings last year to develop it.

Public feedback about the proposed plan called for less testing, changes to the state report card, and more stability, but Ohio’s draft ESSA plan, released on January 19, 2017 only calls for a review of testing, and adds more indicators to the report card to track absenteeism as a quality indicator.

According to the article, in most cases the proposed ESSA plan maintains the status quo in Ohio’s schools, even though the federal law removed requirements about evaluating teachers using student test scores, and provides more flexibility to rate school districts and schools.

The group of educators includes school district superintendents from Amherst, Avon, Clearview, Columbia Station, Elyria, Firelands, Keystone, North Olmsted, North Ridgeville, Oberlin, Olmsted Falls, Sheffield-Sheffield Lake, and the Lorain County ESC; other school officials from schools in Berea, Lakewood, and Wellington; and members of the Ohio Public School Advocacy Network.

A white paper that the superintendents released on February 13, 2017 entitled, A Collective Response to Ohio’s Every Student Succeeds Draft Plan, includes the following recommendations for revising Ohio’s ESSA plan:

-Learning Standards: Revise Ohio’s Learning Standards on a “routine basis and involve others more thoroughly and thoughtfully.”

-Assessments: “Take full advantage of the Federal ESSA structure and reduce the number of standardized tests that are administered to Ohio students.”

-Accountability with Flexibility and Responsibility: Provide flexible accountability to the local districts with increase responsibility. “While we recognize Ohio’s need for a uniform accountability system, please recognize that our state is diverse and those at the local level report to a local community that has needs and expectations of the district.”

-Data Analysis to Improve Outcomes: Require testing vendors to provide the kind of assessment data through a detailed and thorough item analysis that will allow Ohio’s educators to meet the learning needs and gaps that students demonstrate. “We had this more detailed level of analysis on the previous assessments.”

-Value-Added/Growth: “The growth model developed by Dr. Bill Sanders was meant to provide feedback on the academic growth of a student, not the value of a teacher. A predicted growth model measures a student’s progress against his/her previous test performances and indicates whether the student made more than expected, expected or less than expected progress. Ohio’s current model does a complicated mathematical conversion and puts a student’s performance on the normal statistical bell curve and compares him/her to other students. Keep it simple so that students, parents and educators can understand.”

-Real School Quality: Recognize that while the school quality “…metrics proposed by the Ohio Department of Education may be correlated to measures of quality, they are directly related to poverty, socio-economic status and are more in control of parents than educators.”

“Measures of School Quality ought be related to and within the control of those providing the learning opportunities for students. Quality school measures should be directly related to the culture and climate of the school, not factors outside of it.”

-Local Report Card System: “What currently exists is a statewide DRIP phenomenon-Data Rich, Information Poor. Ohio’s Report Card is currently bloated with too many measures that the general public cannot easily use to determine a local district’s progress. Further, the “A -F” reporting system is not descriptive nor accurate. It disenfranchises educators and leaves them with little hope. ESSA requires a three-tier system and Ohio should abandon the grading system to one that is more descriptive. We recommend: Exceeds the Indicator, Meets the Indicator, Approaching the Indicator, Does Not Meet the Indicator for the reasons outlined in this paper.”

-Prepared for Success: “Being prepared for success is more than scoring high on a standardized test. It should be a robust measure that could incorporate the number of College Credit Plus courses provided to students and how many take advantage of them; internship and externship opportunities; partnerships with business and industry and the acquisition of the soft-skill/non-cognitive skills that business leaders indicate they are looking for in high school and college graduates. Ohio’s “test and score” focus has displaced the value of these important components of a student’s development.”

The white-paper concludes, “While there are several items that we would like the ODE, Ohio School Board, Ohio Legislators and the Governor of Ohio to consider, the common thread is less testing and more involvement from those who are most familiar with implementing educational policy grounded on research and best practices. This is all the more reason why, we believe, those charged with the writing should not only hear and gather input from those that have done this at the local level, but must more thoroughly incorporate the recommendations obtained during that discourse.”

As already mentioned, there will be a Community Forum in the Avon School District on February 22, 2017 to discuss Ohio’s plan to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. The Community Forum is set for 7:00 PM at Avon High School, 37545 Detroit Road in Avon.

See “State is ignoring the public’s wishes in its ESSA plan, 10 local superintendents say,”  by Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer, February 14, 2017 at http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/02/state_ignoring_the_publics_wis.html#incart_m-rpt-1

 

FYI ARTS

NEA and NEH Still on the Chopping Block:  Now that former U.S. Representative Mick Mulvaney has been appointed director of the Office of Management and Budget, the Trump administration is moving forward with drafting its first budget for FY18, which begins October 1, 2017.

The New York Times reports on February 18, 2017 that the administration has created a list of programs that could be eliminated in the proposed budget.  The list includes the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Legal Services Corp, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and more.

Funding for the endowments for the arts and humanities was $147.9 million each in FY16. The NEA provides federal dollars to every Congressional district in the country to support arts projects, state arts agencies, and regional arts agencies.

Grants from the National Endowment for the Arts have supported the Ohio Arts Council and arts organizations throughout Ohio for years. In May of 2016 the Ohio Arts Council was awarded the second highest state partnership agreement grant in the nation totaling $983,200, and Ohio arts organizations earned an additional $425,000 in grants.

As recently as December 2016 the Ohio Arts Council reported that 28 arts organizations in Ohio and individual artists would receive NEA grants totaling $682,000 during this grant period.

Currently the federal government is being funded through a continuing resolution, because Congress and the White House, under former President Obama, were unable to approve a FY17 budget last October.  The continuing resolution expires on April 28, 2017, and the Trump administration is expected to request a supplemental budget for the remainder of FY17, while Congress works on the FY18 budget.

See “Popular Domestic Programs Face Ax Under First Trump Budget,” by Sharon LaFraniere and Alan Rappeport, The New York Times, February 18, 2017 at https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/02/17/us/politics/trump-program-eliminations-white-house-budget-office.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0&referer=https://t.co/Ein4KCWscm

See http://www.oac.ohio.gov/News-Events/OAC-News/articleid/41/nea-awards-more-than-30-million-for-arts-projects-nationwide

See http://www.oac.ohio.gov/News-Events/OAC-News/articleid/27/ohio-arts-council-earns-second-highest-statewide-grant-from-the-national-endowment-for-the-arts-for-seventh-consecutive-year

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

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