Portrait of an Arts Advocate: Baba Jubal Harris

Baba JubalBaba Jubal Harris
Teaching Artist

Baba Jubal Harris, BSEd. is the founder of the Ohio Heart Beat Drum Circle. He is the 2015 recipient of the Ohio Heritage Fellowship, and is a master teaching artist with the Ohio Arts Council’s Arts Learning program. Harris is a member of OAAE’s Artists in Schools roster.

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: As a child I danced, played percussion, trumpet, French horn and flute. I enjoyed drawing, photography and woodworking. I participated in art class at the Cincinnati Museum of Art. I performed in school band and orchestra throughout grade school.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: My favorite “a-ha moment” came when I realized that I enjoyed teaching the arts as well as performing. I discovered I had the ability to integrate the arts into academics and make learning very enjoyable.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: The simple joy of allowing myself to be creative inspires me to discover more. It allows me to collaborate with people who are innovative, inspiring and creative. I meet these people in all walks of life every day and each one of them inspires me. I practice creativity by sharing my creativity.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: One puzzle I am working on right now is how to help parents, administrators and educators gain an appreciation for the fact that the arts are not separate from academics but are an integral part of the whole learning process.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: Dr. Chuck Davis, Baba Ishangi, Fotala Borde, and Mrs. DuPrist were arts educator who impacted me, may they rest in peace. They showed me by their example what excellence requires. They taught me how to give “peace, love and respect to everybody” through the arts.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Talk to school board members, administrators, teachers and parents about the value of the arts in your child’s life and in your community. Address issues in the arts and arts education that have an impact on people’s lives. Vote for candidates who work to provide your child with high quality arts education. Attend performances and art shows at community schools. Develop good relationships with merchants in your community who support the arts and art education. 


The Portrait of an Art Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you’d like to submit your information, or to learn more about this feature email akruse@oaae.net.

 

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Arts on Line Education Update February 12, 2018

Baba JubalPORTRAIT OF AN ARTS ADVOCATE  

Baba Jubal Harris
Teaching Artist

Baba Jubal Harris, BSEd. is the founder of the Ohio Heart Beat Drum Circle. He is the 2015 recipient of the Ohio Heritage Fellowship, and is a master teaching artist with the Ohio Arts Council’s Arts Learning program. Harris is a member of OAAE’s Artists in Schools roster.

Q: How did you participate in the arts as a child?

A: As a child I danced, played percussion, trumpet, French horn and flute. I enjoyed drawing, photography and woodworking. I participated in art class at the Cincinnati Museum of Art. I performed in school band and orchestra throughout grade school.

Q: Describe your favorite “a-ha moment” in arts education.

A: My favorite “a-ha moment” came when I realized that I enjoyed teaching the arts as well as performing. I discovered I had the ability to integrate the arts into academics and make learning very enjoyable.

Q: How do you practice creativity in your own life and / or what inspires you?

A: The simple joy of allowing myself to be creative inspires me to discover more. It allows me to collaborate with people who are innovative, inspiring and creative. I meet these people in all walks of life every day and each one of them inspires me. I practice creativity by sharing my creativity.

Q: Name one puzzle, or problem, you are working on in the field right now.

A: One puzzle I am working on right now is how to help parents, administrators and educators gain an appreciation for the fact that the arts are not separate from academics but are an integral part of the whole learning process.

Q: Name an arts educator who impacted you and how they influenced your younger days.

A: Dr. Chuck Davis, Baba Ishangi, Fotala Borde, and Mrs. DuPrist were arts educator who impacted me, may they rest in peace. They showed me by their example what excellence requires. They taught me how to give “peace, love and respect to everybody” through the arts.

Q: What can the average person do to advocate for more and / or stronger arts education in local schools?

A: Talk to school board members, administrators, teachers and parents about the value of the arts in your child’s life and in your community. Address issues in the arts and arts education that have an impact on people’s lives. Vote for candidates who work to provide your child with high quality arts education. Attend performances and art shows at community schools. Develop good relationships with merchants in your community who support the arts and art education. 


Portrait of an Arts Advocate is a monthly feature profiling an OAAE member active in advocating for arts education in Ohio.  If you would like to submit your information or recommend an #artsed advocate to us, email akruse@oaae.net.

 

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Senate Education Committee
The committee heard testimony on the following bills last week:

Sub. HB21- COMMUNITY SCHOOLS (Hambley) Regarding verification of community school enrollments.

Rep. Steve Hambley (R-Brunswick) testified that Sub. HB21 is ‘a win for public schools’.  His proposed measure would take the onus from public schools to verify residency of community school students and instead requires charter schools to keep track of the home districts in which their students reside. HB21 changes the obligation from the public schools to community schools on the foundation that each school should only be responsible for verifying the residency of the students they serve.

Sub. HB21 will not only ease the burden on school districts but also ‘ensure more timely and accurate updating of records.’ Hambley stated that “By ensuring accurate residency records, we can better ensure that our school districts are not paying for students who do not live in their districts, and guarantee that the funding going to community schools is coming from the correct accounts.”

HB98 CAREER INFORMATION (Duffey, Boggs) Regarding the presentation of career information to students.

Business leaders from around the state testified in favor of the bill that would establish standards for universities, trade schools, employers and military recruiters to present information to high school students. HB98 would provide recruiters the opportunity to present career information twice per year to high school students.

Matt McClain of the Ohio Chamber of Commerce indicated that HB98 was timely legislation because of the number of companies that find it difficult to fill skilled labor positions. “Contributing to this is the fact that many students are not aware that such opportunities exist, or what educational path is available to reach their goals,” Mr. McClain said. “HB98 will help by introducing students to exciting job fields they are unaware of, and how they may get there.”

SB216 SCHOOL REGULATIONS (Huffman) To enact the “Ohio Public School Deregulation Act” regarding the administration of preschool and primary and secondary education programs.

The committee accepted two amendments which sponsor Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima) explained would make the following changes: maintain administration of the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment and modify training requirements for educators teaching gifted students. More amendments are expected to be introduced in the coming weeks on this evolving piece of legislation.

Matt Dotson, with the Ohio Education Association’s (OEA) government relations division, presented opponent testimony to the bill’s current version. “Of primary concern are provisions OEA views as diluting or eliminating safeguards in teacher licensure that are designed to ensure the professionalism and preparedness of educators serving students in the classroom,” Mr. Dotson said. However, there are certain provisions in the bill that OEA does support including Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) reform and allowing for a paper format testing option.

OEA stands as an Interested Party on provisions like requiring the State Board to change the grade bands of teacher licenses. “Reviewing the effectiveness of current licensure grade bands is worthwhile and may reveal the need to make adjustments,” Dalton said.  “A more narrowly tailored approach might seek more grade band flexibility for special subjects that are particularly hard to staff in some areas of the state (e.g. foreign languages).”

Addressing the provision pertaining to grade band flexibility, Joseph Keferl, chair of the State University Education Deans (SUED) indicated many of SUED’s members support more flexibility and increased authority at the local level to meet immediate staffing needs. Mr. Keferl told Sen. Huffman that SUED has done extensive outreach to gather feedback on the bill and created the following list of recommendations for the committee to consider instead of returning to the previous grade bands:

  • Expand the existing Early Childhood (PreK to 3rd grade) to PreK to 5th grade
  • Maintain the existing Middle Childhood licensure band (4th – 9th grades)
  • Maintain the existing Adolescence to Young Adult licensure band (7th – 12th grades)
  • Create additional Intervention Specialist licensure options for Pre K through 5th grade, 4th – 9th grades and 7th – 12th grades to support dual licensure programs (General Education and Special Education) while maintaining the current Kindergarten through 12th grade mild – moderate and moderate – intensive Intervention Specialists licensure bands
  • Give superintendents authority, based on their professional judgement, to assign an experienced teacher (with three or more years of experience) within one grade of their licensure band without additional endorsements for a period of up to two years.

SB216, introduced in October 2017, is on a relatively slow track due to its large number of provisions affecting so many areas of Ohio law.  A substitute bill has been introduced, and additional Senate Education Committee hearings and further changes to the bill are likely.  OAAE will soon post an analysis of Sub. SB216 on its website.

 

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Monday, February 12

8:00 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

 

Tuesday, February 13

8:30 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 S. Front St, Columbus

State Board of Education Meeting

4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse House Room 121

Education and Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

  • HB477 (Koehler) Eliminate general and primary and secondary school provisions 1st Hearing, Sponsor Testimony
  • HB438 (Hambley, Kick) Address composition of educational service centers 3rd Hearing, All Testimony
  • HB442 (Antani) Allow student holding F-1 visa to be in interschool athletics 2nd Hearing, Proponent/Interested Party Testimony

 

Wednesday, February 14

11:00 a.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 115

Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee Chair: Duffey

  • HB110 (Hagan, Dean) Expand College Credit Plus to include apprenticeships 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony

 

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: $8 Million Available Through Ohio’s Community Connectors Program

“For the fourth year, community organizations, faith- or values-based groups and businesses are being asked to partner to encourage one-on-one mentorship in Ohio’s schools and help give more students access to role models who can motivate and inspire them.

Gov. John Kasich created the Community Connectors program as a key initiative to foster increased student mentorship. Since its inception in 2014, Community Connectors projects have provided mentoring opportunities to more than 100,000 students across Ohio. In 2016-2017 alone, volunteer mentors provided more than 500,000 mentoring contact hours. In total, 51 of 88 counties are, or have been, home to one or more Community Connectors grants.”

 

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Columbus Dispatch: OhioCorps proposed to mentor high schoolers vulnerable to drugs

“The OhioCorps bill, which will be sponsored by Republican Reps. Bill Reineke of Tiffin and Scott Ryan of Granville, seeks to give college students the opportunity to mentor at-risk high school students and give high school students the opportunity to volunteer in their communities and earn scholarships.”

Associated Press: Ohio lawmakers, groups reach deal on redistricting proposal

“A compromise between state lawmakers and voting rights advocates over how Ohio draws its congressional maps is headed to the May ballot after clearing the state Legislature on Tuesday.

The constitutional amendment is aimed at curbing gerrymandering, the manipulation of district boundaries for political advantage, amid national concern that the current districts are contributing to partisanship, gridlock and incivility in Washington.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Congressional redistricting plan passes Ohio House, will appear on May ballot

“Ohioans will vote in May to change how the state draws its congressional districts to a process that supporters say will lead to fairer, more competitive districts. The Ohio House on Tuesday approved Senate Joint Resolution 5 in an 83-10 vote, sending the proposal to be filed with the secretary of state’s office for the May 8 ballot. The Senate approved the proposed constitutional amendment in a 31-0 vote Monday night.”

The Toledo Blade: More candidates enter crowded field for Ohio governor

“The crowded fields to succeed Republican Gov. John Kasich and challenge Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown grew more crowded Wednesday with passage of the deadline for candidates to file petitions for the May 8 primary election. Eight Democrats filed petitions for governor, including three who had not been in the picture until now. That compares to the relatively compact race of two political heavyweights on the Republican side — Attorney General Mike DeWine and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor.”

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

PD logoArts Assessment: Evidence of Success
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

 

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

 

 

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

 

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Arts On Line Education Update February 5, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Senate Education Committee

The committee accepted substitute bills of the following:

 

SB216 SCHOOL REGULATIONS (Huffman) To enact the “Ohio Public School Deregulation Act” regarding the administration of preschool and primary and secondary education programs.

The committee accepted a substitute bill moved by Sen. Terhar, which allows districts to substitute the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment, changes the highly qualified teacher definition as well as addresses gifted education and College Credit Plus.

Sen. Terhar indicated that the substitute amendment was necessary for additional updates in the works.

 

SB82 SCHOOL ABSENCES (Williams, Lehner) To require a public school to place a telephone call within one hour of the start of the school day to a parent whose child is absent.

Sponsoring Rep. Sandra Williams explained the substitute measure expands the timeframe a school must notify parents from 60 minutes to 120 minutes. It also allows other forms of notification, like texting, to inform a parent their child is not at school.

 

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

 

HB428 STUDENT EXPRESSION (Ginter, LaTourette) Regarding student religious expression and to entitle the act the “Ohio Student Religious Liberties Act of 2018.”

Josh Brown, Legal Counsel and Director of Policy for Citizens for Community Values (CCV), was one of three who provided proponent testimony on HB428.

Mr. Brown testified that HB428 is necessary because “Across the nation, students are being told that they have to leave their faith at the door when they go to school, despite the fact that our laws protect their right to exercise their faith anywhere they are.”

Using stories from different students, Brown described school environments that were unfriendly to a student’s expression of their faith. “Students are also citizens of Ohio, and Ohio must not, through its laws or its institutions, interfere with the rights of religious conscience of its citizens,” he said. “This measure would ensure that citizen students retain the right to their religious expression, and are not to be penalized, marginalized or ostracized for exercising this right in an educational setting.”

Berry Sheets, also from CCV, indicated that although the Ohio constitution already protects students’ religious expressions, HB428 is necessary for clarification.

 

HB438 ESC BOARDS (Hambley, Kick) To permit the addition of appointed members to educational service center boards and to permit a local school district to sever its territory from one educational service center and annex that territory to an adjacent service center under specified conditions.

Craig Burford, executive director of the Ohio Educational Service Center Association (OESCA), testified that “Ohio’s current ESC governance structure is reflective of a bygone era in which our primary customers were ‘local’ school districts and our client base was bound by geographic territory. Neither of those is true anymore.”  Burford continued to say “the bill before you begins to move ESC governance in a more positive direction reflective of current realities including our client base and the programs and services provided by our members.”

William J. Koran, superintendent of the Educational Service Center of Medina County, also supported the flexibility that he said the measure would provide. “By allowing an elected Governing Board to appoint up to four new members from unrepresented entities, this will allow additional districts to have a voice in the governance of the Educational Service Center that serves their districts,” he said. “Each county that would be affected by this bill has a different demographic makeup through its combination of city, local and exempted village school districts. Consequently, every plan will be different.”

 

House Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee

The committee voted out the following legislation:

 

HB58 CURSIVE HANDWRITING INSTRUCTION (Brenner, Slaby) To require instruction in cursive handwriting.

Vice Chair Antani moved to favorably report the bill out of committee. The committee voted unanimously to report the bill.

 

 

RECENTLY INTRODUCED LEGISLATION

HB491 SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS-SPECIFIED SERVICES (Edwards) To require the State Board of Education to issue a substitute license to specified pupil services personnel.

 

 

 

EDUCATION AND CAREER READINESS FORUM

Throughout a day-long forum last Wednesday, state education leaders called for Ohio to invest more cash and energy to increase the number of residents holding a degree or credential. The state’s goal is for 65 percent of Ohioans to have a degree or credential by 2025. Currently, Ohio stands around 43 percent, rating it 33rd in attainment among the states.

A report distributed at the Statehouse event includes a handful of policy recommendations that Sen. Lehner and Rep. Brenner said the state needs to take seriously. They include additional investment in early childhood education, high quality teachers and need-based higher education grants. Additional efforts discussed to reach the attainment goal were increasing access to quality early learning, changing the state’s approach to career-technical education and increasing the state’s offering of need-based financial aid for higher education.

 

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, February 6

9:30 a.m. Ohio Department of Education, 25 South Front Street, Columbus

The STEM Committee will discuss the STEM and STEAM school application review process for 2018, hear from guest presenters regarding quality arts and design integration in STEAM and identify solutions for building teacher capacity in computer science instruction.

 

Wednesday, February 7

3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

  • SB82 (Williams/Lehner) Call parents if student absent from school without excuse 5th Hearing Proponent/Opponent/Interested Party
  • SB216 (Huffman) Enact Public School Deregulation Act-primary/secondary ed-testing 6th Hearing, Proponent/Opponent/Interested Party
  • HB98 (Duffey/Boggs) Address career information presentations to students 2nd Hearing, Proponent
  • HB21 (Hambley) Verify community school enrollments 1st Hearing, Sponsor

 

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Ohio Department of Education Announces Summer Food Service Program Plans

The Ohio Department of Education wants to increase participation in summer meal programs and is actively seeking local nonprofit agencies to participate as sponsors or sites by providing free meals to children. With the help of numerous sponsoring agencies and stakeholders, the Summer Food Service Program works to feed thousands of children in Ohio. Since 2014, Ohio has increased participation in the program by 10 percent.

 

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released its annual ranking of states’ charter school statutes. The 2018 report ranks Ohio as 23rd out of the 45 states that allow charter schools. The ratings measure states’ laws for their inclusion of 21 “essential components” of a strong law, including provisions addressing growth caps, types of schools and sponsors allowed, funding and exemptions from certain education and labor laws. The National Alliance for Public Charter Schools is a national nonprofit organization committed to advancing the public charter school movement.  For the full report click here.

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

PD logoArts Assessment: Evidence of Success
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events

 


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

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Arts On Line Education Update January 29, 2018

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

House Education and Career Readiness Committee

The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Proponent & Interested Party on HB224 (Ingram) To permit districts and schools to re-serve time- and temperature-controlled food items to students if items are unused and returned unopened, undamaged, and in the original packaging.

Currently, the Department of Health requires any food remaining on sharing tables at the end of the day to be discarded, even if proper procedures are in place to safely store the food and keep it at proper temperatures.

Rachel Tilford, food service director of Little Miami Schools and legislative chairperson for the School Nutrition Association of Ohio, said allowing food-sharing tables can benefit students who are food insecure. Having to throw that food away results in about $3,000 of waste annually in her district of 5,000 students alone, Ms. Tilford said.

Jessica Shelly, food service director for Cincinnati Public Schools, submitted written testimony in support of the bill. She said the waste of milk, string cheese and yogurt equates to an estimated $500,000 in products each year.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB438 (Hambley, Kick) To permit the addition of appointed members to educational service center boards and to permit a local school district to sever its territory from one educational service center (ESC) and annex that territory to an adjacent service center under specified conditions.

Co-sponsors, Rep. Steve Hambley (R-Brunswick) and Rep. Darrell Kick (R-Loudonville) said in written testimony “ESCs have proven to be a cost-effective tool for school districts. In fact, they have shown an average 35 percent cost savings, yielding $65 million in savings for the state annually. I think we can agree that when a publicly funded entity shows this efficiency, we should leverage these institutions as much as possible.”

HB438’s intent is to increase member schools’ participation in ESC governance, and return choice to school districts whose hands were tied under previous law changes.The measure allows the governing board of any single county ESC to add appointed members who represent client school districts of the service center that are not otherwise represented on the board. It also permits a local school district to sever its territory from one ESC and annex that territory to an adjacent ESC under certain conditions.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB442 (Antani) To authorize any student from a country or province outside the United States who attends an elementary or secondary school in Ohio and holds an F-1 visa to participate in interscholastic athletics at that school on the same basis as Ohio residents.

Bill sponsors are concerned that those students who come to America on F-1 visas are not given the chance for a ‘complete high school experience’ because they are currently not allowed to play sports. “The Ohio High School Athletic Association and its members – around 85 percent of which are public high schools, paid for by taxpayers – arbitrarily decided several years ago that some international students, like exchange students who are here for a year on a J-1 visa, may play sports, but others, who may be here for four years on an F-1 visa, may not participate unless they meet specific criteria that are not applicable to the vast majority of students who receive an F-1 visa,” said sponsor Rep. Niraj Antani (R-Miamisburg).

 

House Higher Education and Workforce Committee

The committee accepted a substitute version of a measure (HB58) requiring schools to teach cursive handwriting.

In its original form, HB58 would have required schools to teach cursive in grades K-5, with the Department of Education assisting schools with incorporating it into their existing curricula.

Updated language makes following the model curriculum permissive. Rep. Brenner said ODE would notify all school districts of the available model curriculum, which teachers can choose to incorporate into existing language arts lessons.  HB58 now also spells out that the curriculum must be developed by December 31 and adopted by the board no later than March 31, 2019.

 

 

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, January 29

4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Committee  Chair: Brenner

  • HCR11 (Gavarone) Approve plan for implementation of Every Student Succeeds Act 3rd Hearing, All Testimony
  • HB438 (Hambley/Kick) Address composition of educational service centers 2nd Hearing, Proponent/Interested Party Testimony 
  • HB428 (Ginter/LaTourette) Enact Ohio Student Religious Liberties Act of 2018 2nd Hearing, Proponent Testimony  
  • HB377 (Hagan/Ramos) Require age-appropriate sexual abuse and violence instruction  3rd Hearing, Opponent/Interested Party Testimony

 

Wednesday, January 31

11:00 a.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 115

House Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee Chair: Duffey

  • HB58 (Brenner/Slaby) Require instruction in cursive handwriting 7th Hearing, All Testimony 

3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse South Hearing Room

Senate Education Committee Chair: Lehner

  • Presentation Cradle-to-Career Educational Attainment
  • SB216 (Huffman) Enact Public School Deregulation Act-primary/secondary ed-testing 5th Hearing

 

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer ECOT Students Rushing to Other e-Schools But Trickling Back to Districts

“Students from the just-closed ECOT online charter school have started to land in school districts and other charters, but the numbers remain low and it’s too early to tell how well the process is working.  There’s a clear trend so far, however. ECOT students are rushing to other online charters and trickling to districts.”

Columbus Dispatch: Judge Approves Interim Master to Oversee ECOT’s Closure

“Online schools have seen a much greater level of enrollment than Columbus City Schools. Marie Hanna, the superintendent for the for-profit Ohio Connections Academy, said that from last Friday through Thursday, the school received 1,200 new applicants. And, as of Monday, more than 800 students enrolled and nearly 2,000 began the enrollment process at the for-profit Ohio Virtual Academy.”

 

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: Newly Updated Curriculum Module Now Available

“The Ohio Leadership Advisory Council released its updated Curriculum Module to support educators’ efforts to create, adapt, adopt or modify curriculum. This module focuses on enhancing effective practices and addresses the core question of what skills and concepts students need to master.  Check out this free learning resource.”

 

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

The Aspen Institute: How Learning Happens: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development

“The National Commission’s Interim Report, “How Learning Happens: Supporting Students’ Social, Emotional, and Academic Development” captures the Commission’s key takeaways and lessons learned to date, raises the questions we’re continuing to ponder, and ends with an invitation for a broad array of stakeholders to engage with the Commission in 2018. Drawing on diverse voices from across the Commission, this report is a milestone in our collective effort to engage communities nationwide in supporting students’ comprehensive development.”

District Administration: Report: Parents value engagement, but say schools fall short

“Parents rate family and community engagement as the most important driver of satisfaction with their child’s school—but districts frequently fail to offer them a voice in the education system, according to a recent study from Rice University.

Of 7,200 public school parents surveyed, only 34 percent said they were “very satisfied” with family and community engagement, while 43 percent expressed satisfaction with their schools overall.”

“Parents named school safety and teacher quality as the next most important drivers of satisfaction. Extracurriculars came in last place.”

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor
The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for grades 4-12 teachers of all content areas on Wednesday, January 31.

Mimi Herman, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor” from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center. Participants will discover how various concepts and techniques explore the transformation of science into poetry.

View the flyer for program details.

Location: Tri-County ESC, 741 Winkler Dr. Wooster, OH
Date: January 31, 2018
Time: 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Register by emailing tesc_stoler@tccsa.net

 

PD logoArts Assessment: Evidence of Success
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Kennedy Center Teaching Artist to offer PD @ Tri-County ESC

MimiHerman_Flyer_STEAM-Poetry_January31 2018 (1)

 

 

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Arts On Line Education Update January 22, 2018

OHIO’S EVERY STUDENT SUCCEEDS ACT PLAN APPROVED

The U.S. Department of Education (USODE) officially approved Ohio’s consolidated state plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the current name of the federal Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA) which funds primary and secondary education. “Every Student Succeeds” replaced “No Child Left Behind” in December 2015. Two aspects of Ohio’s plan that are considered unique are the special focus placed on vulnerable student populations and its approaches to assist struggling schools by implementing evidence-based strategies. Ohio’s plan also includes continued use of the local report card A-F letter grade system, a new report card measure focused on chronic absenteeism and discipline, and increased focus on English learners as a subgroup, and more. Many education stakeholders across the state have expressed disappointment with the lack of broader vision and higher aspirations expressed in Ohio’s ESSA plan.

USDOE: Secretary DeVos Approves Ohio’s ESSA State Plan

“U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced the approval of Ohio’s consolidated state plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).  “Ohio’s plan met the requirements of the law, and so I am happy to approve it,” said Secretary DeVos. ‘This plan should not be seen as a ceiling, but as a foundation upon which Ohio can improve education for its students.'”

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio’s ESSA Plan Wins Federal Approval – and Few Care

“The U.S. Department of Education has approved Ohio’s new school testing, accountability and improvement plan under ESSA, the national replacement for the controversial No Child Left Behind laws. Though many observers nationally and here in Ohio had hoped states would present grand new visions for schools through the new plans mandated by 2015’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), that hasn’t happened.”

OHIO LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

House Education and Career Readiness Committee
The committee heard testimony on the following last week:

Sponsor testimony on HB418 (Ingram) To require a public or chartered nonpublic school to transmit a student’s records within five business days when the student transfers to another school.

Rep. Catherine Ingram (D-Cincinnati) introduced HB418 in an effort to standardize the timeframe for transferring education records. The legislation requires traditional, private and charter schools to submit records to schools that students are transferring to within five school days of a request. “While most transfers of student records are done in a timely and efficient manner, that is not always the case, and there is no legal mechanism to enforce timely transfers,” she said.

Rep. Ingram said there is no standard timeframe for a transfer of records, however she does not have data on how often student records transfers aren’t completed in a timely manner. According to Ingram, the new measure does not impose penalties on schools that fail to meet the timeline and there is no provision that provides leeway to schools that must transfer a large number of records in the event of closures.

 

Sponsor testimony on HB428 (Ginter, LaTourette) Regarding student religious expression and to entitle the act the “Ohio Student Religious Liberties Act of 2018.”

Sponsors Rep. Tim Ginter (R-Salem) and Representatives Sarah LaTourette (R-Chesterland) told the committee that HB428 was necessary because of the ambiguity in current law on how students can express their religious beliefs. Presently, the law simply prohibits boards of education from promoting religion or forbidding students from exercising religious beliefs. However, HB428 would provide clarity on how school districts should address faith-based organizations and events.

“The extent to which individuals may engage in religious expression in a school setting can be unclear and House Bill 428 seeks to address this issue,”  Rep. Sarah LaTourette said.

The legislation eliminates a law that allows districts to limit religious expression to lunch or other non-instructional time. It also prohibits public schools from restricting students from expressing religious beliefs in their homework, artwork, or other verbal or written assignments. The bill also specifically allows students to express their religions through t-shirts, but boards could also determine that they’d be inappropriate, for example, if they included vulgar language or expletives, Rep. Ginter said.

In addition, any religion-based papers graded by teachers would have to be done so under the same standards as secular-based papers, Rep. Ginter said. Currently, teachers may assign failing grades or refuse to give grades to students who use religious examples in coursework because they’re unsure of the laws.

Sponsor testimony on HCR11 (Gavarone) To approve Ohio’s state education plan for implementation of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

The resolution acts as the “final sign-off” on the Ohio Department of Education’s plan to comply with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, Rep. Theresa Gavarone (R-Bowling Green) said. Rep. Gavarone detailed the federal feedback on the draft plan, which was sent to the state on December 19. The U.S. Department of Education had cited a total of 24 total concerns with the draft that ODE responded to.

Senate Education Committee 
The committee heard testimony on the following last week: 

Sponsor testimony on HB98 (Duffey, Boggs) CAREER INFORMATION

HB98 would establish standards for universities, trade schools, employers and military recruiters to present information to high school students. Co-sponsors Rep. Mike Duffey and Rep. Kristin Boggs outlined their bill that would provide recruiters the opportunity to present career information twice per year to students.

Although Rep. Duffey told Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima) there is no data to determine how many recruiters are facing challenges gaining access to potential future employees in high schools, Rep. Boggs said the measure is one that can help the state’s economy by better alerting students to available jobs.

“Poor access to career information coupled with a growing number of unfulfilled jobs in Ohio’s skilled labor force has a negative impact on Ohio’s economy,” Rep. Boggs said. “By enacting HB98 we will be able to provide students with additional career opportunities and fill job vacancies as the need for skilled employees grows.”

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, January 23

4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121

House Education & Career Readiness Committee Chair: Brenner

  • HB442 SCHOOL ATHLETICS (Antani) 1st Hearing-Sponsor
  • HCR11 EDUCATION PLAN (Gavarone) 2nd Hearing-All testimony
  • HB224 SCHOOL FOODS (Ingram) 2nd Hearing-Proponent & Interested party
  • HB438  ESC BOARDS (Hambley, Kick) 1st Hearing-Sponsor

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer: ECOT closing: Sponsor votes to shut online school after state rejects settlement offer

“The sponsor of the ECOT online charter school voted Thursday evening to close the school despite parents and teachers begging to keep the school open for the rest of the year. The vote, which shutters a school so politically-connected it was once thought untouchable, came just two hours after the Ohio Department of Education rejected an offer from the school that would keep it open through the end of the school year. Its 12,000 students must now seek new schools.” 

Associated Press: New Ohio poet laureate hopes to celebrate poetry in life

“Author readings in the hushed and reverent atmospheres of universities and libraries have their place, but they can also discourage potential readers, says Ohio’s new poet laureate.  “It becomes forbidding and intimidating for people who might say, ‘Oh, I don’t read that kind of book,'” said David Lucas.  Trying to overcome that perception is one reason why Lucas teaches a class at Case Western Reserve University titled “Poetry for People Who Hate Poetry.” He’s also co-founder of Brews + Prose, a monthly reading series in a Cleveland brew pub.” 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Ohio congressional redistricting legislation introduced

“State lawmakers have a proposed constitutional amendment to work with as they continue to discuss changing Ohio’s process for drawing congressional districts.  Sen. Matt Huffman, a Lima Republican, introduced Senate Joint Resolution 5 on Tuesday. The legislation follows a presentation he gave last week to his colleagues on a Senate committee.”

 

 

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ODE: Ohio Department of Education Offers Assistance to Families Affected by ECOT Suspension

“The Ohio Department of Education has resources available for families and educators affected by the suspension of ECOT by the ESC of Lake Erie West.

“The Ohio Department of Education is prepared to support students and families in identifying new educational opportunities to meet their needs,” said Paolo DeMaria, superintendent of public instruction. “Districts and schools have already taken actions to streamline and accelerate their enrollment processes. We know the entire education community will come together with care and compassion in the best interest of these students.”

Families should visit the Ohio Department of Education website and click the “Find a School” button to learn more about the schools near them. Options include schools in their home district, schools in neighboring districts that may allow non-residents to attend (“open enrollment” districts), private schools, and community (charter) schools, including online schools.” 

ODE: School bomb threats: understanding the consequences

“Since the beginning of 2018, bomb threats have been reported at several Ohio schools. Ohio Homeland Security’s Center for P-20 Safety & Security reminds all Ohioans about the emotional effects and legal ramifications of an individual making a bomb threat and the impact to the entire community.”

 

 

NATIONAL NEWS

USA Today: Government shutdown 2018 enters day 3: Will it end Monday?

“The shutdown of the federal government entered its third day Monday, but there was hope of a resolution. The Senate was scheduled to vote at 12 p.m. ET Monday on a bill that would fund the government through February 8, a short-term fix that would allow talks on a permanent deal to continue.

Federal workers deemed “essential” will stay on the job. The mail will be delivered, and military and homeland security operations will remain up and running. And, while hundreds of thousands of workers were furloughed immediately, some some employees were allowed to work up to four hours to prepare for the shutdown.” 

Columbus Dispatch: No shutdown deal reached; moderates on both sides continue search for solution

“The government shutdown will continue into Monday, as restive Senate moderates in both parties continue negotiations over immigration and spending.  A 1 a.m. showdown vote was their last chance to reopen the federal government before hundreds of thousands of federal workers were forced to stay home Monday, but negotiations fell apart. A vote to break a Democratic filibuster on a short-term funding bill is now scheduled for noon Monday.”

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor
The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for grades 4-12 teachers of all content areas on Wednesday, January 31.

Mimi Herman, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor” from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center. Participants will discover how various concepts and techniques explore the transformation of science into poetry.

View the flyer for program details.

Location: Tri-County ESC, 741 Winkler Dr. Wooster, OH
Date: January 31, 2018
Time: 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Register by emailing tesc_stoler@tccsa.net

 

PD logoArts Assessment: Evidence of Success
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.

Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)

Workshops will focus on these topics:

  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:
Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
info@oaae.net
614.224.1060
www.oaae.net

Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

OAAC_logo_finalThe Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.

Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events


Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment

Arts On Line Education Update January 16, 2018

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING RECAP
January 8 – 10

Graduation Requirements

The State Board of Education voted last week to extend the class of 2018’s softer graduation requirements for two more years to students graduating in 2019 and 2020.  Board members sited stability for the school districts and students as well as data collection opportunities as reasons for the two-year extension.  The 2018 graduation pathways were provided as an exception for the class of 2018 as new statewide graduation requirements took effect this school year.

Under the eased rules for the class of 2018, students would still have to earn the required 20 course credits, take all end-of-course exams, and retake any of those math or English exams on which they earned a score of 1 or 2 on a 5-point scale.  But they wouldn’t have to pass the exams. If they didn’t score the required 18 of 35 points, they could graduate by meeting any two of nine other requirements:

  1. 93 percent attendance senior year
  2. A 2.5 GPA in at least four full-year senior-year courses
  3. A senior-year “capstone” project
  4. 120 hours of senior-year work or community service
  5. Three credit hours via College Credit Plus
  6. Passage of an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate class and exam
  7. A “level three” score on each of three components of the WorkKeys test
  8. Industry job credentials totaling at least three points in Ohio’s system
  9. Receipt of an Ohio Means Jobs readiness seal.

In order for the relaxed graduation requirements to be put in place for the next two school years, the board’s recommendation would have to be included in legislation approved by the General Assembly.  If state legislators approve the policy, it still would need the governor’s signature to become law.

The Board plans to continue discussions to create on a long-term solution to the graduation requirements debate on the following timetable:

  • February and March: committee discussion on what the state wants its graduates to know, and how they can demonstrate knowledge skills and attributes; extension of strategic planning discussions; review of survey results on graduation options
  • March through May: committee discussion on the needs and purposes of assessments; engagement with educators and the business sector
  • May through August: discussion of graduation requirements for students with disabilities
  • September and October: review additional data from the class of 2018; finalize recommendations
  • November: committee vote on recommendations
  • December: full board vote on recommendations 

 

Dayton Daily News: Softer Ohio graduation rules may be expanded for 2 more years

“The state school board overwhelmingly recommended Tuesday that softer, non-test-based graduation requirements be extended to the Classes of 2019 and 2020.  The relaxed standards have already been approved for current high school seniors (the Class of 2018). Those students still must pass 20 course credits, but rather than also passing state tests, they can earn a diploma by achieving any two of nine other standards, such as good senior-year attendance and grades, or via a senior-year project plus 120 hours of work or community service.” 

Columbus Dispatch: Board wants to extend relaxed graduation requirements

“The Ohio Board of Education voted 16-1 Tuesday to urge lawmakers to extend relaxed requirements for a high school diploma already given to the class of 2018 to the classes of 2019 and 2020 as well.  “This is our first experience with graduation requirements that aren’t solely test based. We have added these other elements in and we don’t know yet which of these different pathways to graduation are effective are being used by students, or have value,” said board member Laura Kohler of New Albany.” 

State Report Cards

The board’s Accountability and Continuous Improvement Committee recommended changes to the state report cards to include a separate report card for first attempts and retakes of end-of-course exams. By separating these data points, the Board and the Department of Education expect more districts would be able to increase their ‘indicators met’. Creating a separate indicator also ensures that schools aren’t discouraged from counseling students who scored low on the first test to retake the test to potentially earn more points toward graduation.

Chris Woolard, senior executive director of the Ohio Department of Education’s Center for Accountability and Continuous Improvement, estimated that if the proposed retake indicator had been in place for the latest report cards, 77.7 percent of districts and more than 66 percent of schools would have met it.

If the measure is approved by the full board in February, the proposed indicators met structure will appear on the 2017-18 school year report cards set to be released in September.

In addition to the specific test retake indicator, Superintendent Paolo DeMaria joined the discussion to paint the picture for broader reform on the report card. DeMaria and Woolard reviewed each of the report card’s six components, identifying commonly heard issues of criticism or questions.

As reported by the Hannah News Service, issues they identified with each element are as follows:

  1. Achievement Component: Meaningful differentiation, proficiency thresholds, the effect of retakes and the inclusion of non-academic indicators in the Indicators Met measure.
  1. Progress Component: The grading scale, the number of years of data used, weight relative to achievement measures, and the overall complexity of the measure.
  1. Gap Closing Component: Meaningful differentiation and the n-size used in calculations.
  1. Graduation Rate Component: Treatment of students with individualized education programs (IEPs), including severely cognitively disabled students.
  1. K-3 Literacy Component: Confusion created by the indicator’s name and its alignment to the third grade reading guarantee, as well as the low grades received by districts with small numbers of struggling readers.
  1. Prepared for Success Component: Appropriateness of the measures used to calculate the component, and the division between which measures are used in the base calculation and which are used to accrue bonus points.
  1. Composite Grade Calculation: Weighting of progress versus achievement components, the generally necessity of an overall grade, the use of an A-F scale and comparability.

Columbus Dispatch: Critics want revamp of Ohio’s report cards on schools

“Colorful and packed with a cornucopia of data and letter grades spread across numerous educational categories, Ohio’s state report cards.  But how that data are calculated and translated has turned the annual report card into a lightning rod of criticism from teachers, parents and education officials who question whether the information is understandable or fair, or if it provides an accurate measure of a district’s academic performance.”

Strategic Planning

ODE Chief Strategy Officer Shaun Yoder led the Strategic Planning discussion with the board last Wednesday. The majority of the time was spent on deliberating the state-level vision and overarching goal which read as follows:  

The state-level vision: Each Ohio high school graduate is prepared with the knowledge and skills to pursue his/her chosen post high-school path and become a life-long learner who is an engaged, culturally-aware and contributing member of society.

The overarching goal: To significantly increase the number of graduates who, within a year of graduating, are enrolled and succeeding in post-secondary learning, serving in the military or working in a full-time job that pays a living wage.

The board also reviewed draft lists of strategies identified by the Early Learning and Literacy workgroup and the Student Supports, School Climate and Culture workgroup.  These discussed strategies are still subject to change.

 

ON THE CALENDAR

Tuesday, January 16
4:00 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Room 121
House Education & Career Readiness Committee Chair Brenner

HB428 (Ginter, LaTourette) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
STUDENT EXPRESSION
HCR11 (Gavarone) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
EDUCATION PLAN
HB418 (Ingram) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
STUDENT RECORDS
HB246 (Boccieri, Rezabek) 3rd Hearing-All testimony
CLASSROOM FACILITIES

Wednesday, January 17 

3:15 p.m. Ohio Statehouse Senate South Hearing Room
Senate Education Committee Chair Lehner

HB98 (Duffey, Boggs) 1st Hearing-Sponsor 
CAREER INFORMATION

 

 

OHIO NEWS

Cleveland Plain Dealer: ECOT could close this month, loses money, “sponsor” support

“The controversial ECOT online charter school could close by the end of this month after financial woes led its sponsor and oversight agency to pull away. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT) was told Wednesday by its sponsor, the Educational Service Center of Lake Erie West, that it will suspend its sponsorship because the school cannot meet its financial and legal obligations for the rest of this school year.”

Columbus Dispatch: School districts brace for influx of ECOT students

“What does it look like when thousands of students — roughly the enrollment of one of Ohio’s largest school districts — suddenly lose their school? Ohio might be on the verge of finding out, as the online Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, where between 12,000 and 20,000 students attend at any given time, could close within a week because of the lack of a sponsor and bonded treasurer.

Cleveland Plain Dealer: What attributes should a high school graduate have? It’s not just the “three R’s” anymore

“What should a high school graduate look like in Ohio? The state school board has been weighing that broad and sweeping topic the last few months as members develop long range goals that can shape the future of Ohio’s schools.”

 

NATIONAL NEWS

USDOE Releases Education Revenues & Expenditure Data

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics released its latest revenues and expenditures report (FY15) for public elementary and secondary schools. The report includes national and state totals, revenues by source, expenditures by function and object, and current and instructional expenditures per pupil.

USDOE/IES/NCES: Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2014–15 (Fiscal Year 2015)

“This report contains national and state totals of revenues and expenditures. This First Look includes revenues by source and expenditures by function and object, including current expenditures per pupil and instructional expenditures per pupil.”

The 74: The States That Spend the Most (and Least) on Education — and How Their Students Perform Compared With Their Neighbors

“Across the United States, current expenditures for public K-12 education rose by over $18 billion during the 2014–15 school year, according to a new report released by the National Center for Education Statistics. That uptick was part of a 5 percent increase since fiscal year 2013, and total expenditures stood at $575 billion overall for the year.”

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
STEAM Poetry: Teaching Science through Metaphor
The Wooster team of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts’ Partners in Education program will offer an arts integration professional development workshop for grades 4-12 teachers of all content areas on Wednesday, January 31.
Mimi Herman, Kennedy Center Teaching Artist, will present “STEAM Poetry:  Teaching Science through Metaphor” from 4:30-7:30 p.m. at the Tri-County Educational Service Center.  Participants will discover how various concepts and techniques explore the transformation of science into poetry.
Location: Tri-County ESC, 741 Winkler Dr. Wooster, OH
Date: January 31, 2018
Time: 4:30-7:30 p.m.
Register by emailing tesc_stoler@tccsa.net
Chance to Dance
Momentum-Excellence at the Speed of Dance invites dance instructors and educators from across the state to take part in one or all of a series of workshops designed to support inclusive dance instruction. The workshops are open to all educators, with the workshop content focusing on dance/ movement.
These workshops are presented in collaboration with VSA Ohio and OhioDance. The workshops are free of charge to participants, thanks to funding provided by the Ohio Department of Education.
The full-day workshops take place at varying locations in Columbus. Visit the website for full details.
Visual Disabilities
Date: January 22, 2018
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Seham, Director of Dance Education, National Dance Institute
Ohio Music Education Association 2018 Professional Development Conference
The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) is giving OAAE members the opportunity to attend their 2018 Professional Development Conference at a discounted rate. This is a great opportunity to learn from the wide variety of clinics that will be presented during the conference. The deadline to register is January 19, 2018.
Location: Columbus Convention Center
Date: February 8-10, 2018

Use the attached flyer to register for OMEA’s conference

Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success
OAAE logo
High-quality assessments are an integral part of measuring and monitoring student growth and informing classroom instruction. Arts educators are often left on their own to develop assessments and identify student growth measures, often without adequate background in assessment design and implementation.
Our Arts Assessment Professional Development workshop will help educators acquire skills in developing, reviewing, and selecting high-quality assessments. Sessions will focus on foundations of assessment literacy, quality assessment design and an understanding of why they are important to instruction and student learning. Workshops are appropriate for all fine arts disciplines (including dance, music, theater and visual arts.)
Workshops will focus on these topics:
  • How to prioritize fine arts standards
  • Deconstruction of standards
  • Aligning assessments with standards
  • Principles of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
  • Arts assessment blueprints – plan of action and creating assessments
  • Sharing with & learning from colleagues
  • Assessment resources on the Ohio Arts Collaborative website

To schedule professional development sessions for your district’s fine arts teaching staff contact:

 

Ohio Alliance for Arts Education
614.224.1060
Downloadable flyer to share with administrators and colleagues: Arts Assessment: Evidence of Success

The Ohio Alliance for Arts Education is a leading member of the Ohio Arts Assessment Collaborative, a consortium of Ohio school districts, Battelle for Kids, the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education, and the Ohio State University.
Upcoming public sessions hosted by Educational Service Centers:
Host: Summit ESC
Date: March 7, 2018
To register contact: summitesc.org/events

Arts On Line keeps arts education advocates informed about issues dealing with the arts, education, policy, research, and opportunities.

The distribution of this information is made possible through the generous support of the Ohio Music Education Association (www.omea-ohio.org), Ohio Art Education Association (www.oaea.org), Ohio Educational Theatre Association (www.ohedta.org); OhioDance (www.ohiodance.org), and the Ohio Alliance for Arts Education (www.oaae.net).

This update is written weekly by Andrea Kruse, OAAE’s Research and Information Coordinator.

Posted in Arts On Line | Leave a comment